Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: treatment

Hep, hep, hooray!

Editor’s Note: As we come to the conclusion of Hepatitis Awareness Month, we are pleased to share with our readers a column written by Gene Weingarten of the Washington Post. Gene Weingarten is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and writes “Below the Beltway,” a weekly humor column that is nationally syndicated. The column initially appeared online on May 21, 2015.

As far as helping to erase the unfortunate stigma of the disease, I fear my personal story may not be of much value. While it is true that many hep C victims become infected through blood transfusions or organ transplants, or in other innocent ways, mine was contracted during my college years, when I showed as much care for my personal health as your average suicide bomber. I got hep C because of my appetite for altered states of consciousness, which is a highly dignified way of saying that I enjoyed sticking needles in my arm to facilitate nodding and drooling.

HepatitisAwarenessMonthBecause of modern medicine I no longer have hep C, but in a sense, I am still “living with it.” That is because most every time I get blood drawn for any reason, the results arrive with a gigantic warning that I have hepatitis C. (As it happens, once you have the disease, the telltale antibodies in your blood hang around forever, like your wife’s doofus brother Duane.) For the instant until you remember this fact, the medical news is terrifying, but even afterward you are dispirited. It’s like having one of those suggestive small-of-the-back tattoos, the occasional glimpse of which reminds you that you were once a stupid dirtball.

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A message from our sponsor: If you or someone you love is living with Hepatitis C and is struggling to afford the treatments, the HealthWell Foundation may be able to help. Click here to visit HealthWell’s eligibility page.

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I know that hep C is a particularly insidious scourge, since many people who have it are asymptomatic for a long time, meaning they don’t know they have it, meaning the disease often progresses without treatment for far too long. If you were ever at risk, get tested! I can testify to the wisdom of this because of how I was diagnosed.

I discovered that I had it, and that I’d had it for two decades, only by accident, after going to the doctor following a startling grease-related bodily event that caused me to have to leave work and buy a new pair of pants. (I am telling this here because of my deep commitment to disseminating important medical truths during Hepatitis Awareness Month, and because, as a humor columnist, I have no remaining sense of shame.) My grease problem turned out to have been benign, the result of a single binge episode of eating peanut butter from a tablespoon. This would have been deeply reassuring, except the doctor then told me that something else had shown up in the blood work. “Something else showed up in the blood work” is one of those things that is not good to hear, like a concerto for flugelhorn, vuvuzela and cowbell.

But in the end, my experience with hepatitis C is that I got over it, which I hope will be an inspiration for readers of this blog. It is true that my cure came only after injections into my thighs three times a week for nine years, but this should not be discouraging.

First, the treatment is easier now. Second, the life-or-death uncertainty with which I was living provided philosophically beneficial. For nine years I embraced life as never before, becoming more responsible, more appreciative, a more sober and serious person.

Then I got cured and forgot about all that crap. Win-win!

What Happens When an Investigational Drug Cures Some Patients, but not Most?

David Sheon

David Sheon

To date, 179,158 clinical studies have been registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Though the majority of these trials result in unsuccessful attempts to bring a drug to market, an untold number of lives have been saved or extended as a result of the successes.

But how many lives were saved by drugs that did not meet their clinical endpoint? Recently, the attention of the medical community has been drawn to “exceptional responders.” These are patients who, contrary to expectation, respond extremely well to drugs that are not found to be effective (or even safe) for use in the general patient population studied in a clinical trial.  The study doesn’t meet its endpoints, but a small number of patients thrive.

With the advent of relatively cheap and easy genetic sequencing, researchers are beginning to better understand why exceptional responders do so well on drugs that have little to no benefit for most patients.

In one case, featured recently in an article in The New York Times, a patient has been living four years with a cancer she was told was untreatable, because she responded well to an experimental drug. Of the seven people given the drug, she was the only one who responded. Sequencing her tumor’s genes, the researchers were able to determine that her response was due to the natural presence of a protein that her cancer needed in order to grow.  The experimental drug stops the production of the same protein. Doctors and researchers have been perplexed by these types of cases for years, yet have only recently been able to examine why this is occurring. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have begun a study to “understand the molecular underpinnings of exceptional responses to treatment.”

Regardless of the science behind it, there is a very real, ethical dilemma raised by the existence of these exceptional responders. If the drug does not get approved, and especially if the company producing the drug  loses investors and goes out of business because the drug trial didn’t meet its endpoints, exceptional responders will have no way of accessing a treatment that could well save their lives just because of an anomalous genetic makeup. There is nothing in place to guarantee that these patients will be able to access their treatments, even if there are no other alternatives.

According to Wayne Pines, President of Regulatory Services and Healthcare at APCO Worldwide and former Associate Commissioner for Public Affairs at the FDA, however, this issue is not so clear-cut.

“There are a lot of factors that go into a decision as to what an individual patient should do.  Each decision has to be individual,” he said. “We must also take into account the fact that clinical trials are essential to determine if a new drug works and is safe, and there are limits to how much of an experimental product can be produced.”

All of this would seem to indicate that a blanketing policy for dealing with individual patients is not where we have to focus. The presence of the exceptional responder makes it difficult to determine a drug’s efficacy, especially when researchers cannot explain the patient’s response.

“If reasonable endpoints have not been met, then the question is whether the drug has the potential to work,” Mr. Pines said. “Again, this is a decision that has to be made on specific facts, not on the basis of a set policy. A general one size fits all answer to these kinds of questions does not work.”

Ultimately, more research must be done on these cases before making decisions about how to deal with them. With recent advances in molecular testing, hopefully the day is near when we can understand what causes a patient to respond exceptionally, and where to go from there.

What do you think? Should there be policies set in place to protect these patients? If not, how can we ensure that patients can access the drugs they need, when they need them? Let us know in the comment section.

Categories: Access to Care, General

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Please Help on #GivingTuesday.

ECRFjumboCancer Doesn’t Care.

It doesn’t care that a patient can’t afford pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center. Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Do you?

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day where families, individuals, and businesses will come together with a common purpose: giving thanks and helping others.  #GivingTuesday is an annual opportunity to celebrate generosity and donate or volunteer for your charity of choice.  Show that you care about cancer patients by giving to HealthWell’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF).

Whether or not you can make a donation, we’d like your help to build awareness for the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. One of the easiest ways to help is to share our graphics and messaging (below) with your networks.

1. Please join me in support of @HealthWellOrg’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. Click here to donate today: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

2. Join us on #GivingTuesday to help #cancer patients cover critical out-of-pocket expenses. http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

3. Provide meaningful comforts to cancer patients by supporting the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

With your support, we will be able to open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund to assist qualified cancer patients so they can better manage their road to recovery…when waiting another day is not an option.

We hope that you will consider helping HealthWell. Together, we can make the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund a reality. Learn how you can make a difference in the life of a cancer patient.  Join us in showing that you care by donating and reaching out to friends and family through your social network.

Patient of the Month: Sharon Harris Survives Lupus and Pays It Forward

Sharon Harris remembers February of 2002. She remembers where she was, what she was wearing, and what she was feeling. Most of all, she remembers the day she was diagnosed with lupus.

SharonHarris1

Sharon Harris, lupus awareness advocate and founder of Lupus Detroit

May is Lupus Awareness Month. Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when the body’s immune system is unable to distinguish between foreign illnesses and the body’s own tissue and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart, lungs, and other organs. Although there is no cure for lupus, there are numerous medications that can alleviate its symptoms.

Sharon had just graduated from Florida A&M University in Tallahassee when she received her diagnosis. “I was 22 at the time, fresh out of college,” Sharon said. “You’re taught while you’re growing up to learn your manners, respect your elders, and get a good education. No one tells you about an autoimmune disease that you will have for the rest of your life.”

Nor had anyone told her what having lupus would entail. “I immediately went into battle mode,” she said. “I had graduated from college. I had traveled 1200 miles from my family to make my journalism degree happen, and I was going to fight.”

“But, as soon as I got my fight on, that’s when all the pain started.”

Sharon experienced a flare-up of symptoms. It would be an understatement to say that the rest of that winter was difficult for her. Her hair began to fall out. She suffered from constant fatigue and pain. In the month of February alone, Sharon lost thirty pounds.

After beginning treatment on several different medications, Sharon started feeling better by that summer. One Wednesday during a Bible study, Sharon was asked what she would do if it were her last day on Earth.

“I said I wanted to see the world,” Sharon said. “Because if lupus was going to take me out, then it was going come and find me in Paris on the Eiffel Tower or on a beach in the Virgin Islands.”

By chance, Northwest Airlines (now Delta) had put out an ad to recruit flight attendants. It was a dream job for Sharon. The job provided her with better insurance, and on her off days she could fly to any location on Northwest’s roster. Just as she had hoped, Sharon got a chance to see the world. Amazingly, Sharon started to find that her experience with lupus was helping her have a healthier mindset. “It really made me think of life in a whole different way, and just literally live. Just really get out there and live,” she said.

Sharon eventually moved back to Tallahassee, opening an eyelash parlor and holding down an office job. At that point, she experienced another flare-up. “In October in Tallahassee it is still 100 degrees outside, and I was wearing a wool coat,” Sharon said. “I was so sick.” Sharon packed up and returned to her hometown: Detroit, MI.

Now, too sick to work and without a job, Sharon did not have health insurance. The lupus was attacking her kidneys and the medicine that she was prescribed cost upwards of $3,000 for a month’s supply. Despite pinching pennies to afford her daughter’s medication, Sharon’s mother was willing to refinance her house to save her only child’s life.

That’s when Sharon’s luck shifted. One day, she visited a local lupus organization with the intention of buying a t-shirt, and she ended up walking out with a new job. Her new public relations position did not include benefits but being employed allowed her to purchase health insurance.

Although she had insurance, her share of the payments for her four medications was unaffordable; one of the therapies alone cost more than $1,000 per month. That’s when Sharon found out about the HealthWell Foundation from a Google Alert. HealthWell is a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog).

“Literally, HealthWell saved my life,” Sharon said. “I didn’t have to incur any debt, my mother didn’t have to refinance her house, and HealthWell saved the day.”

SharronHarris2

And Sharon wanted to save the day for others like her. She has become a leading activist for lupus awareness, starting her own advocacy group called Lupus Detroit, which offers lupus patients emergency grants. Sharon points out that there are two colors that are used for lupus awareness, orange and purple. She opted for orange for her organization because the color is “louder” and garners more attention. “Lupus needs all of the attention that it can get,” Sharon said.

Sharon is currently in remission and has been doing well since receiving a grant from HealthWell in 2011 that allowed her to afford her medications. “I was inspired by the work that HealthWell does to help people with their medications,” she said. “I just don’t believe that someone should have to choose between paying for their medication and feeding their children.”

And neither do we, Sharon. Keep up the excellent work.

If you are inspired to help, consider raising awareness during Lupus Awareness Month and showing your support. Here are some suggestions:

  • Make a donation to HealthWell’s SLE Fund in honor of a family member or loved one who is battling lupus.
  • Celebrate World Lupus Day on Saturday, May 10th.
  • Put on Purple on Friday, May 16th and visit The Lupus Foundation of America’s website at www.lupus.org to learn how you can show your support.
  • Find your local Lupus Foundation of America chapter to learn about activities in your area.

Has lupus touched your life? Do you have plans to show support during Lupus Awareness Month? Share your story in the comments section.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

If you would like to suggest a topic, contribute a guest post, or learn more about short-term co-sponsorship opportunities, please contact us at dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com. As a blog currently sponsored solely by the HealthWell Foundation, an independent non-profit providing nationwide financial assistance to insured Americans with high out-of-pocket medication expenses, co-sponsorship helps us keep Real World Health Care alive and well as a resource for journalists, health care professionals, policymakers, and patients. Plus, co-sponsorship will increase your organization’s visibility among thought leaders in the health care sphere.

Do you have a favorite Real World Health Care post? Is there something you’d like to see more of? Post to the comments section or tweet at us at @RWHCblog.

What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Editor’s Note: This MS Awareness Week, we are pleased to feature a guest post by Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business. Mr. Cavuto is an inspiration to many people living with multiple sclerosis, and he shares his perspectives on triumphing over the disease.

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Perhaps the most maddening thing about having MS when you’re a TV anchor is that some days it hits you when you’re on TV and you’re “trying to anchor.” You’re trying to be on top of your game, but your body is playing games with you. That’s when “anchor” takes on a whole new meaning…not what I am on television, but the dead weight I’ve become in reality.

It’s at those times when I can’t move, that I often feel moved to explain to viewers, “it’s not me, it’s the MS.” It’s not me forgetting that guest’s name, it’s an exacerbation hitting my brain and causing me to forget that guest’s name. It’s at those times I lose my train of thought, that I question how thoughtless MS is. That’s when this illness hits home – when I just want to hit back, but can’t. This MS Awareness Week, it’s about reminding folks what it feels like to be…weak…to be vulnerable, to simply be unable to do the simplest things.

I can’t tell you the number of people who stop me and ask how I get through such moments. Fortunately, they’re moments, I answer. But sadly, sometimes very long moments. The one remarkable aspect of MS is how it quickly schools its victims to adapt…or perish. We either have to adjust to its wild, sometimes vicious swings, or face a life constantly succumbing to each and every progressive or remittent reminder.

That’s easier said than done, of course, but after more than 15 years of dealing with this, for me, it’s come to this: mind over matter. No matter what’s going on with your body, tell your brain it doesn’t matter. For me, the regimen for dealing with MS has been pretty much the same – once-a-week self-injections of Avonex, Biogen’s great elixir for slowing the progressive attacks, or at least, limiting their severity – over time.

But that doesn’t mean things don’t come up, and problems and complications still develop. For me, they’ve been everything from days-long blind spots that require me to “wing” my news copy on air…to allowing more time to make it to the news set, because I simply cannot walk.  I long ago concluded I cannot control these attacks – neither their frequency nor severity. But I “can” control how I react to them. That’s why I always try adapting and reasoning in my head that if the left eye goes out, coordinate better use of the right eye. The left arm weakens, get fairly competent enough with the right arm. These adjustments aren’t easy or fast but they certainly are now routine. That’s good for me, but it was hit and miss for years, perfecting this behavior for me.

I’m better at it now, but my nickel-and-dime advice for MS sufferers everywhere is, it’s a day at a time now…always. Part of doing what I do is understanding how I can keep making my body do it, even when it’s not cooperating. I mentioned how I often memorize copy and whole segments of my show in my head, for those moments I lose my vision. But there’s much more to it than that. After all, that’s fairly easy when I’m the one writing my shows…I kind of remember what I said. But it’s also about maintaining my physical energy, and that means denying the very progression of the disease itself.

Each and every morning, no matter what, I exercise my legs – certainly no Olympian workout – but on a treadmill or stationary bike, doing what I can to keep these legs going, even when they’re not cooperating. I’m forever panicked that someday they’ll simply fail, and then I’ll be a cripple. I fear that day is coming. Some neurologists warn me that given the progressive nature of my MS, it “will” be coming. But I fight like hell to push that day off. If I can pass along any advice at all, it is simply that – to simply never accept a prognosis as is. Fight it. Challenge it. “Will” yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.

One of the things I’ve discovered about people dealing with illnesses is that sometimes they think they’re the only ones dealing with pain. There’s a natural self-absorption to that and to them, and when you throw in a guy who wears makeup and counts on viewers liking him, there’s a damn-near “fixation” to it. That’s not to say MS patients shouldn’t ask for support and understanding, they just shouldn’t demand it. As I’ve said many, many times, on the air and off, it’s not your spouse’s fault you have MS, or your kids’ fault, or your boss’s fault, or your colleagues’ fault. We may be surprised the world isn’t always understanding or caring or nurturing. But I’ve discovered all of us in life, bear some cross in life. Some are obvious. Some aren’t. But all do, if not at the time we literally first bump or trip into them…eventually.

I’ve become very philosophical with this disease, and concluded (heresy for a media personality) that it’s not always about me. It’s not always about us. It’s not always about our pain, or exacerbation, or what we’re forgetting, or what muscles are failing. I try to tell my kids we are the sum of our challenges, not necessarily the sum of our successes. I believe we are defined in life, not by the things that go well in our lives, but precisely by how we handle the things that do not.

I want that to be our greatest awareness this week – that we are not weak, that we are not victims, that we are not handicapped. We are challenged, yes. But we are up to the challenge. It might sound crazy to say that I’m grateful for MS, and grateful as well for having had cancer…but I am, and here’s why. It’s made me a better person, a better father, and a better husband. Now, I don’t know if viewers hearing my constantly compromised scratchy voice agree it’s made me a better anchor on TV. But “I” know it’s made me a more complete soul…just appreciating the fragility of life. That’s why I never take it for granted and have a healthy respect for just appreciating your health…compromised as it is. Because it sure beats…the alternative.

Make this a meaningful MS Awareness Week by promising never to stop seeing the strength that comes from being…weak.

Categories: General

Should clinicians replace medication with an ancient spiritual practice?

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University sifted through over 18,000 studies on a potential treatment for pain, anxiety and depression, narrowing their meta-analysis to 47 scientifically rigorous clinical trials. The results, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, revealed what many have experienced over thousands of years: while it’s not a cure-all, this treatment can help alleviate pain, anxiety and depression. The treatment? Meditation.

David Sheon

David Sheon

Meditation began as an ancient spiritual practice but is now also utilized outside of traditional settings to promote health and well-being. The study findings incorporate the effects of mindfulness meditation on over 3,500 participants who were selected to take part in either a meditation regimen or a different therapy, such as exercise. Overall, researchers found that the effect of meditation on participants was moderate and on par with that of prescription medications.

While this is a promising result on the benefits of meditation, the researchers identified a number of limitations. The study did not find any evidence of meditation affecting other health concerns such as positive mood, attention, substance use, eating habits, sleep and weight. Also, meditation did not provide any long-term therapy as compared to medication. “The benefits did attenuate over time — with the effectiveness of meditation decreasing by half, three to six months after the training classes ended,” said study leader Dr. Madhav Goyal, an assistant professor of medicine at Hopkins. “We don’t know why this occurred, but it could have been that they were practicing meditation less often.”

Still, Dr. Goyal said he is encouraged by the study’s results, specifically because of the short training periods for the participants. There may be greater potential for individuals with more instruction or experience in meditation. “Compared to other skills that we train in, the amount of training received by the participants in the trials was relatively brief,” he said. “Yet, we are seeing a small but consistent benefit for symptoms of anxiety, depression and pain. So you wonder whether we might see larger effects with more training, practice and skill.”

While the new study suggests that in some cases, meditation may be used in addition to or in lieu of prescription drugs to treat pain, anxiety and depression, it is important for patients to consult their doctors before altering any course of treatment.

At RealWorldHealthCare.org, we have been interested in meditation’s potentially positive impact on health. Last April, we posted about a recent study in which meditation halved the risk of death, heart attack and stroke in African American men.

Meditation may have economic benefits as well. According to a July 2013 Huffington Post blog, Aetna’s employee health care costs went down by 7 percent in 2012 after the company implemented a wellness program, which CEO Mark Bertolini attributes to reducing stress through meditation and yoga. In recognition of its positive health impact, some insurance companies provide benefits for meditation instruction. For example, CareFirst’s Options Discount Program offers up to 30% off fees for participating meditation instructors. In 2010, Americans spent more than $11 billion on antidepressants, according to the American Psychological Association.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the NIH offers an introduction to meditation, its uses and guidance for those who wish to practice meditating. The National Meditation Specialist Certification Board, an organization that seeks to promote meditation as a specialized field in health care, keeps a directory of meditation specialists, and there are many other such directories available online or through participating insurance providers.

In a Psychology Today article guiding those interested in mindfulness meditation, Dr. Karen Kissel Wegela emphasizes that sick or healthy, meditation can help people cope. “The sitting practice of mindfulness meditation gives us exactly this opportunity to become more present with ourselves just as we are,” she says. “This, in turn, shows us glimpses of our inherent wisdom and teaches us how to stop perpetuating the unnecessary suffering that results from trying to escape the discomfort, and even pain, we inevitably experience as a consequence of simply being alive.”

Have you ever meditated? Have you or someone you know ever meditated to treat depression, pain or anxiety? Did you find it effective?

Categories: General

Be a HealthWell Hero for Patients This Holiday Season

“HealthWell literally saved my life.”

If we told you that the perfect holiday gift could help save a life, you probably wouldn’t believe us. Think again. You’ll make a sick person’s wish come true when you give the gift of health to patients in urgent need of financial assistance by donating to the HealthWell Foundation.

100% of contributions to HealthWell will go directly to help patients access critical, often life-saving services. Your generous gift — whether it’s $10, $25, $50 or more — could make all the difference for people who are struggling to get better. Just ask Sharon, from Detroit, MI.

Feeling drained and not knowing where to turn, Sharon wasn’t sure how she was going to afford the high cost of her lupus medications. Then she discovered HealthWell, which gave her the financial help she desperately needed, just in time. Now Sharon can continue working and her family no longer has to pinch pennies to help her pay for treatments:

“What people sometimes fail to realize is that people with chronic conditions are dependent on prescribed therapies,” Sharon said. “The absence of these treatments means that we can potentially miss out on an enhanced quality of life. That’s a terrible notion to fathom because who doesn’t want to live their best life possible?”

We couldn’t agree more. At HealthWell, we believe no patient – adult or child – should ever go without the treatments they need because they can’t afford it.

When you donate to us for the holidays, you’ll be a hero for patients like Brad from Myrtle Beach, NC.

“Thanks to grants from HealthWell, I can now get the medication I need to keep my disease at bay!”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Financial assistance from HealthWell enables Brad to get the medication he needs to manage Rheumatoid Arthritis.

The generosity of supporters made it possible for him to afford the care that empowers him to control his severe/aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis. Without a grant from HealthWell, he says he would live “a life of degrading joints, pain and disfigurement.”

Amy from Whitesburg, GA, was diagnosed in May 2010 with stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a blood cancer. Because supporters like you were there for her, she’s now living to celebrate her children’s birthdays and watch them grow up.would live “a life of degrading joints, pain and disfigurement.”

“After each of my eight chemo treatments, I received a treatment to boost my white blood cell count,” she said. “Your donation helped pay for those very expensive treatments, and they helped! I NEVER got sick during my treatment phase. I have now been in remission for 14 months!”

Amy, Brad, and Sharon are not alone. Our work is not done.

Folks all over the country – mothers, fathers, children, friends, neighbors and loved ones – are getting sick and watching the bills pile up, with no end in sight. The need is great and patients are counting on you to step up so we can continue to be a lifeline in these tough financial times.

Join us in saying Happy Holidays to patients and families by giving them some relief so they can start the New Year off right.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Give Patients the Gift of Hope and Health by Supporting HealthWell for #GivingTuesday

We are proud to announce that the HealthWell Foundation – an independent 501(c)(3) charity that provides financial assistance to insured patients living with chronic and life-altering illnesses – is joining the #GivingTuesday campaign, which launches today. 100 percent of your donation to HealthWell goes directly to grants and services that will benefit patients in need across the country. This week we are sharing some powerful real-world examples of how your gift to HealthWell will help transform lives.

Lynn Harcharik

Lynn, who received financial assistance from HealthWell for cancer treatments.

As one of our country’s most trusted independent charities, we believe that no patient, including those living with cancer, should go without health care because they can’t afford it. By donating to HealthWell for #GivingTuesday, you’ll join us in making that commitment a reality that will change lives for the better, one patient at a time – just like Lynn.

It was ovarian cancer spreading to the colon. My husband called many places, no cancer society would help! One society asked what type of cancer it was, and replied: there are no funds for ovarian cancer – we cannot help. Another organization had already used their funds. It was very discouraging, but my oncologist’s secretary told us about the HealthWell Foundation. After calling and talking to your group, the answer was YES, you would help. (Thanks!) In October of 2008, reversal surgery was done with the ileostomy. And yes, the cancer came back, or maybe was not completely gone from before, but-more chemo! Thank you for being there in my time of need. My prayers are with your group and your work. Thanks!

– Lynn (Streator, IL)

We want to make a difference for even more patients like Lynn so they can access critical medical treatments and get better. But that can only happen with your support.

That’s why, for this year’s #GivingTuesday, we’re urging Real World Health Care (RWHC) Blog readers to donate to the HealthWell Foundation’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). Your generous holiday gift will help ensure that patients living with cancer are not forced to choose between paying the rent or buying food and affording life-saving care.

So what, specifically, will your tax-deductible #GivingTuesday donation do? Giving to ECRF will bring us closer to meeting our $100,000 goal by the end of the year so the fund can open in January. We are almost halfway there with more than $46,000 raised so far. Every dollar counts, and with just a little more help, we will hit our goal so that more cancer patients can start 2014 off right.

To help more families and patients afford the urgent medical treatments they desperately need, we need you to support #GivingTuesday starting today. Please contribute as generously as you possibly can.

Thank you for giving the gift of health this holiday season.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Profiles in Courage: Beating Breast Cancer One Story at a Time

As we recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, heroes, organizations and allies nationwide are leveraging creative strategies to empower patients and families, educate communities and mobilize supporters to overcome the disease and live healthier.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Are You Dense?

Dedicated to “informing the public about dense breast tissue and its significance for the early detection of breast cancer” Are You Dense? seeks to educate the public and raise awareness around dense breast tissue and the need for early detection through online tools and resources in addition to speaking engagements. This organization helps women diagnosed with breast cancer by highlighting what it’s like to live with the disease, advocating changes to public policy around detection and supporting new and existing research.

Athena® Warriors

From the time she was a little girl, six-time Grammy winner singer/songwriter Amy Grant knew that cancer “was a force to be reckoned with.” Amy was inspired at a young age by the work of her father – an oncologist who spent his entire medical career treating cancer – to join the band of warriors. A tireless advocate, she draws courage from the countless women she helps empower every day to fight breast cancer, along with her fellow warriors: Amanda Beard, Angela Stanford and Karen Gooding.

“I am inspired by every Athena Warrior. If my music can bring women together and make a connection, then I have contributed something. Athena water takes a terrible situation and does something good for many; that’s why I love being an Athena Warrior,” Grant said.

Terror for Ta-Tas

Woods of Terror — a haunted theme park in Greensboro, North Carolina — hosts the annual “Terror for Ta-Tas Night” to benefit breast cancer survivors. A percentage of the proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to Cone Health Cancer Center’s “Finding your New Normal” program for breast cancer survivors.

Tami Knutson, Breast Cancer Center Manager for Cone Health, is passionate about helping Terror for Ta-Tas because she believes it will empower more Americans to live healthier and bring us closer to ending breast cancer.

“I teach young women about self-breast awareness,” Knutson said. “There is not another venue that I have access to young people.  Most health fairs attract people in the middle years and older. I find teaching  in such a crazy, unexpected location very rewarding. It catches people off guard and I think my message is really heard.”

The Terror for Ta-Tas event runs from 7:30–11 p.m. Friday, October 11. For event information visit terrorfortatas.com, and to learn more about the “Finding Your New Normal” program e-mail Tami Knutson at Tami.Knutson@conehealth.com.

Tough Enough to Wear Pink

A non-profit marketing campaign sponsored by Wrangler, Tough Enough to Wear Pink (TETWP) began with breast cancer survivor Terry Wheatley who, with Wrangler, challenged cowboys and cowgirls to wear pink at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo to raise awareness and to honor the women in their lives that had been affected by the disease.  TETWP serves as a springboard for communities to create rodeos and other western events that raise awareness around breast cancer.  By focusing attention on women’s health, this initiative raises money for women’s health education, supports women’s treatment centers and much more.

“The success of the Tough Enough to Wear Pink campaign – which has raised over $14.5 million dollars since its inception in 2004 – is that every community that participates through their rodeo or their western event is encouraged to keep their money locally to do good in their own back yards through contributions to their women’s breast cancer center, the women’s breast cancer wing of the local hospital or whatever breast cancer support group is in need in their community,” Wheatley said. “It is the decision of the local rodeo committee or event on who receives their donation.  The success of the campaign is that it is truly grass-roots, with people raising $5 at a time to support someone in their community.”

For example, Red Bluff Round-Up raises money for breast cancer treatment at the St. Elizabeth Imaging Center in their community of Red Bluff, California, to provide mammograms and other women’s health services directly from the funds generated through their TETWP rodeo event. This is just one of the many examples of how individual rodeos and western events use their funds to help women live healthier lives.

Now tell us how you are touching the lives of women living with breast cancer. What are you doing in your local community, place of worship, school or workplace to spread the word about how we can stop this disease together?