Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: technology

If Uber can Deliver Flu Shots, Could Drones Deliver Medications?

Vanessa Merta

Vanessa Merta

Last Thursday, Uber test ran a new concept that added wellness to its mission of evolving the way the world moves. Along with making cities more accessible, Uber made health care more accessible with flu shot deliveries. Currently, we know of no other companies delivering vaccines upon request like Uber, but we do know of a few other health care delivery services in the works, and some of the more exciting services include drones.

DHL has been researching delivery of health care with drones they’re calling “parcelcopters.” While Amazon Prime Air has been working on delivering products via drone, DHL is testing the system with medications specifically. As a part of a month long test run that began in September, they have been delivering medications via unmanned aircraft from a coastal town in Germany to the small island of Juist, about seven and a half miles away. The only restriction thus far has been the inability to send medications that need to be refrigerated. DHL is still early in the product testing process, but they are hopeful that this can be a way to deliver medications to those who live in rural areas, or are unable to get to pharmacies.

While delivering mediations via drone sounds like an optimal solution that could provide quick health care to people in hard to reach places, some ethical questions arise. Could personal identifying information be at risk if these parcelcopters crash? A DHL spokeswoman says that the drones will not fly in the same altitudes as conventional aircrafts, and also avoid this possible breach of privacy by avoiding flying over homes.

Time magazine quickly refuted another common fear that drone delivery will increase air pollution, claiming that it can be greener than traditional forms of pick up and deliveries.

Time reporter Bryan Walsh says that delivery services are “a lot more efficient at delivering products to you than you are at driving out and buying them yourself,” and drones are no exception.

Following in Amazon Prime Air’s path, FedEx has been researching drone delivery, but they want to find a specific niche. They have not named their interests yet, but why not consider medication delivery? Over the summer, Google announced that they have been researching drone delivery in the Australian outback, where they successfully delivered first aid kits to rural farmers. Both companies are in the developing stage, but once finished this could be a promising new technology that improves health care accessibility.

American companies will have a more difficult time than DHL in Germany because the Federal Aviation Administration bans the use of unmanned aircrafts to deliver commercial products. Amazon says that as soon as the FAA has the proper regulations in place, it will begin delivering products via drone. Maybe after that, an American drone delivery service will claim medication delivery as their niche.

How would you feel about drones delivering your medications? Do you think these nontraditional methods of health care delivery will gain acceptance and popularity in the future? Tell us what you think in the comments section!

Categories: Access to Care

How New Apps and Technology Create a New Central Nervous System for MS Patients: A Look at the Current State of Online Disease Management

By Vanessa Merta, Science Blogger

RWHC Writer Pic-2

Vanessa Merta

With over two million people suffering from multiple sclerosis and a cure for the debilitating autoimmune disease remaining illusive, patients are using new technologies to improve how they manage the disease. By leveraging web-based technologies and smart phones, patients have new weapons to improve their symptom management by collaborating with other patients and access care more easily.

Websites such as www.PatientsLikeMe.com play a supportive role by helping patients understand and manage their disease, and track potential outcomes. Patients use the website to connect with other patients to track symptoms, relapses, and medication results. By entering these data, patients not only learn more about managing their illness, they also help scientists and doctors use the data for research.

In a recent TedxTalk, PatientsLikeMe President, Ben Heywood, spoke of the growing MS community, currently at over 25,000 active users on the site. “You can see what it’s like to have MS,” said Mr. Heywood. “Symptoms in real-time of thousands and thousands of patients [are captured],” analyzed for trends, and help inform researchers in ways that may expedite a cure.

These widespread patient histories may prove to be helpful to drug developers because they can see what symptoms are not well managed, in the hopes of creating a goal for a future drug. With the knowledge of medication success rates, researchers can see if any drugs have the potential to be improved, or if they should be forgotten all together. Before websites like PatientsLikeMe.com, obtaining this kind of information was nearly impossible.

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Want to help those suffering with MS? Consider donating to the HealthWell Foundation, and note that you wish for your donation to go to the MS Fund. Click here to learn how to donate to patients in need. ************************************************************************************************

When patients are on the go and don’t have access to a computer, smart phone applications offer welcome help. Patients have their entire health history with them at all times with apps such as the MS Association of America’s Multiple Sclerosis Self-Care Manager. Patients track mood and symptoms in a journal, and record whether or not they’ve taken their medications on schedule. In emergency situations, MS Self-Care Manager helps find physicians or hospitals with a Google-Map powered locator. The app makes doctor’s appointments more productive due to immediate access to lab results, and a record of all symptoms since the patient’s last visit.

Medical technology is trying to lessen the burden that an MS diagnosis may bring. Resources for patients are continuing to improve with the development of smart phone apps and online sites where patients can collaborate.

Technology has created its own version of a central nervous system by building a patient community with dynamic connectivity. Helping patients to manage symptoms by improving hand-held technology has become a reality for tens of thousands of MS patients. Until we have a cure or advances in medicine, these simple programs offer real benefits.

Tell us what you think about symptom tracking and online disease management. Have you put any of these products to good use?

Categories: General

New App Makes Diabetes Care Delivery a Whole New Ballgame

A father brings his son to a baseball game. The day is nice, the weather is good, but there’s one problem: the boy has Type 1 diabetes, and they forgot his test strips. Do they leave the game for home or a pharmacy? Do they wing it, risking the boy’s health and trying to manage his blood sugar with his diet?

Nathan Sheon

Actually, they opt for the third choice: HelpAround, a mobile safety net for people with diabetes. The
man can pull out his phone, see that there is another diabetes patient two sections down, and ask for the supplies his son needs. With that, the day is saved.

A story like that is how HelpAround began. Established in 2013, HelpAround was designed to bring people with diabetes together in a common space to provide not just peer-to-peer support, but peer-to-peer care as well. Using new mobile technology, the app provides a highly personalized account of treatment needs and matches patients accordingly with other patients who have similar needs.

According to Yishai Knobel, CEO and co-founder of HelpAround, the service fills in what is otherwise a gray area of diabetes treatment. People with diabetes face a large spectrum of constant health concerns that vary widely in severity. Not having test strips, for instance, might not warrant going to the hospital, but can be very serious for patients who need to constantly monitor their health. With an app like this to fall back on, according to Knobel, people with diabetes are able to live more normal lives knowing that they can get the help they need whenever they need it. “People with chronic conditions have so much going on, on top of their everyday lives,” he said. “Creating this social safety net is really something valuable.”

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Did you know that September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month? One way to help pediatric cancer patients and their families who are faced with a devastating medical emergency is to donate to HealthWell Foundation’s Pediatric Assistance fund.  Click here to learn more and donate to help families in need.

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HelpAround also provides a less tangible but equally important factor for its patients: a sense of belonging to a community. Though he did not want to disclose numbers, Knobel said that in the early stages of the app’s launch, 85% of requests for help received a response. For people with chronic conditions, knowing that there is a dedicated support base by patients and for patients is invaluable.

“Connecting the right people at the right time in a system can create a wonderful moment of empowerment, support and comradery,” Knobel said.

With use of the app growing, patient groups for other chronic diseases have also begun to discuss using technology like this. With communication technology advancing and a growing call for more patient-centered solutions to health issues, Knobel believes that technologies like HelpAround will allow patients to manage their own health needs more efficiently.  Perhaps most important, the app helps patients stay compliant with their treatment schedule.

“We want to really give the patient a full support system, (helping them) on the go, focusing on their needs, to better manage their health care,” Knobel said.

Have you ever used HelpAround or a similar technology? What was your experience? What does this mean for the future of care-delivery and treatment compliance? Let us know in the comment section!

Categories: Access to Care, General

A Leap Forward for Virtual Health Care

Have you ever sat in a doctor’s office waiting room wishing your physician could have visited you at home? In many states, physicians can now conduct evaluations directly through your laptop, smart phone, or tablet, and patients are responding with enthusiasm.

Roy Schoenberg, MD, MPH

Roy Schoenberg, MD, MPH

However, medical boards in some states have adhered to older rules that prevent use of telemedicine. A recent development will balance their legitimate concerns about abuse of this technology with its immense benefits, enabling states to realize the promise of telehealth in possibly reducing health care costs and improving patient outcomes.

In April, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) adopted new policy guidelines for the safe practice of telemedicine. States finally have a basic roadmap for ensuring that patients are protected in this fast-changing health care delivery environment. The new guidelines provide much-needed clarity on “Do’s and Don’ts” in the use of telehealth technology when practicing medicine and frame the principles of operation that must be adhered to in order to preserve patient safety and quality of care. They offer a detailed framework needed to revise outdated rules. I expect many state medical boards to tailor the guidelines to meet their own perspectives and cultures moving forward, but as a whole, health care will take these new rules as sign of the times and modernize to embrace telehealth.

In an event such as this, it is important to take a step back and acknowledge history in the making. The unanimous ratification of these new guidelines is probably the strongest message the house of delegates of the FSMB could have sent; decisive leadership such as this is impressive and rare. Telehealth adoption will come when people gain clarity that it is a safe and valuable way to deliver care; the FSMB has done a terrific job in preparing the landscape for large-scale use of telehealth.

The fact that the FSMB did not make any changes to the definition of telehealth is not an oversight. In fact, on the contrary, it is a reflection of the great diversity in this technology. Ten years ago, telemedicine was only a construct between physicians. Today, we have telehealth with multiple end points between patients, mobile health, wearable devices, home biometrics, health care kiosks, e-visits of sorts, etc. The FSMB tried to keep definitions very high-level in order to prevent these important guidelines from becoming obsolete over time, as many other guidelines and rules have before.

There are still barriers to the widespread adoption of telehealth. State licensure of physicians limits how helpful the technology can be to spread health care services to where they are challenged. Reimbursement by Medicare and Medicaid is essentially nonexistent, mostly because of the unknown impact on future costs. Physicians are still afraid they will be sanctioned if they don’t examine a patient in-person. There are more examples like these. The good news is that these barriers are quickly eroding. Most importantly, patients – our industry’s main customer – love telehealth.

In the end, the people will prove stronger than the industry’s outdated rules, and the floodgates will open. In ten more years, the term telehealth will be gone, and this technology will simply be an integrated part of mainstream health care.

Please share your perspective in the comments section below.

Virtual Health Care: Your Questions Answered by a Telehealth Pioneer

If you follow the latest developments in health care, you may have noticed: telehealth has taken off. Our country is focused on making health care more accessible for Americans, and naturally, telehealth has emerged as a key innovation that can help to make this a reality. It’s an effective way to deliver evidence-based medicine – and it’s something that we as physicians can embrace right now.

Dr. Peter Antall

Dr. Peter Antall

As President and Medical Director of the world’s first telehealth practice, Online Care Group, I’m often asked a handful of common questions about telehealth. Here, I share the most common questions and my answers with Real World Health Care’s readers.

What is telehealth?

To me, telehealth is simple. Telehealth is a live video visit between a doctor and a patient from home or work. This differs from traditional telemedicine, which mainly connected hospital facilities to each other and relied on big, expensive hardware in clinical locations.

With telehealth, the patient can have a video visit with a doctor using every day consumer technologies that are becoming ubiquitous: a smartphone, tablet, or computer. There are other forms of telehealth on the market that use only phone or secure email; however, these visits do not allow for the same level of clinical patient evaluation. I have met with medical boards and associations across the country and found that live video is greatly preferred because it represents the closest interaction comparable to an in-person visit.

Do patients really want to talk to a doctor virtually?

For starters, let me just ask you when was the last time you shopped, banked, booked travel, made a dinner reservation, filed your taxes, or communicated with friends and family online. Chances are – if you’re like many Americans – you’ve done more than one of these things today, probably on your phone or tablet.

While the health care industry has done a great job of supplying information to patients online and has even started to offer patients the opportunity to book appointments online, information and scheduling stop short of what patients want and expect from health care: quality interactions with clinicians. To date, health care ‘transactions’ have only occurred at the intersection of a physical location and the supply of available clinicians. The industry can do better.

Over the last several years, a number of studies have shown that patients are rapidly warming to the concept of interacting with doctors online. Estimates suggest that half to three-quarters of Americans are interested in online consults, and I’d expect this number to grow as more patients have access to telehealth services and as more doctors offer such services to patients.

If you think about the patient experience today, it’s not surprising that most folks respond so positively to the value of telehealth. Consider the national average wait time to see a doctor of 18.5 days, not to mention the excessive wait time in certain urban and rural areas. And once you’re in the doctor’s office, that wait can be long, too, which you know if you’ve ever spent two or three hours in an urgent care clinic or emergency room waiting to be seen. Retail clinics are an option, but these are generally not staffed by a doctor and are often not available outside of normal business hours.

On the other hand, a patient can see a doctor in just a few minutes from their phone or tablet. For example, our wait times at the Online Care Group currently average less than 2.5 minutes, and there’s no appointment or travel required. So it’s not surprising that 97% of patients rate the service “very good” or “excellent”.

How do you examine a patient during a telehealth visit?

Examining a patient through video is different from in-person, though the fundamental rules of medicine still apply. The most important elements of any consultation – online or in-person – is taking a thorough history, asking plenty of questions, and doing a visual examination. Having a video connection with a patient is really important in helping to understand the patient’s overall demeanor and level of discomfort and stress, just as in the exam room. This gives me great insight into the patient’s physical and mental well-being. In terms of a physical exam, I’ve developed protocols to help our doctors guide patients through self-exams in order to provide empirical feedback that’s useful in making certain diagnoses.

One of our main tenets is that doctors must use their own clinical discretion when treating patients online. Our physicians diagnose and treat only when enough data can be ascertained in the video consultation to do so. If not, our physicians triage the patient and refer out for in-person care. That may mean seeing their doctor in-person, going to the emergency room, or ordering tests at a local health center.

What about security issues?

As with brick-and-mortar medicine, it is extremely important to protect patient health information. The information regarding a patient’s health should remain private between the physician and the patient and be stored securely, in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). American Well provides a secure space for patients to safely and confidentially consult with a doctor online. This is imperative for an effective and safe telehealth practice.

What does telehealth have to offer me as a doctor?

Telehealth is not only convenient for patients; it offers doctors flexibility at work, reliable pay, and access to new patients. And not only individual and group practices, but even large medical practices and hospitals, are starting to use telehealth to attract and retain patients and to expand their reach.

By incorporating telehealth, hospitals under accountable care organization (ACO) contracts, or otherwise caring for patients under capitation, reap the financial benefits of having healthier patients. Private offices can offer open access and after-hours care or designate that a subset of visits, like medication follow-up, be managed through telehealth. Practices can also bring in other specialties virtually into their office, like certified diabetes educators, dieticians, or behavioral health specialists.

Can I make money with telehealth?

There is high demand from patients for urgent-care-like telehealth services. Today, physicians across the country – including those in our national telehealth practice – make a very good living practicing medicine online, providing care anywhere from 10-40 hours per week.

Another option is for doctors to offer telehealth to their existing patients. In many states, doctors are already being reimbursed for services delivered to their own patients by including GT modifiers in their billing (this modifier is used to indicate telehealth services via interactive audio and video telecommunication systems). Currently 20 states mandate private payer reimbursement for telehealth services and 45 states reimburse for some telehealth services. As our doctors move from fee-for-service to capitated payment models under the Affordable Care Act, they are absorbing the risk (“rewarded for performance,” as some might say). Telehealth is one way to improve efficacy and efficiency of patient care. Telehealth lets doctors increase the number of touch points for patients, which potentially can improve outcomes as well.

Is telehealth the future of healthcare?

Telehealth isn’t really a new form of healthcare; it is the same healthcare that Americans are using every day, delivered in a faster, less expensive, more convenient way. Although not everything can be treated via telehealth, it’s a great option for many types of acute care, chronic care, behavioral health, and wellness services. Patients, doctors, hospital systems, employers, insurers, regulators, and legislators are all rapidly changing the way they view health care in order to incorporate telehealth. In the coming months, the proof that telehealth is here to stay will become even more evident. It’s time to embrace the now of health care.

Have you ever used telehealth? Would you? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments section.

If you have any questions or to learn more about where and how I practice telehealth, email me at peter.antall@americanwell.com.

Dr. Antall is the Medical Director of Online Care Group, a physician-owned primary care group that offers its clinical services online using American Well’s technology. American Well’s web and mobile telehealth platform connects patients and clinicians for live, clinically meaningful visits through video, supplemented by secure text chat and phone. For more information, visit AmericanWell.com

Categories: Access to Care

Four benefits of electronic health records

Leaders from industry, academia, and health care discuss the rollout of this technology at The Atlantic’s sixth annual Health Care Forum

Today The Atlantic Health Care Forum brought together leading policymakers and industry experts in medicine, public health, and nutrition to have conversations about the state of the nation’s health care system. The event was sponsored by Siemens, Surescripts, WellPoint, GSK and PhRMA. Real World Health Care attended to share insights from the panel “Health Care Tomorrow: Examining the Tools and Technologies that Will Revolutionize the Future Health Care System.”

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Much of the discussion centered around electronic health records, which are increasingly being rolled out in huge hospital systems after the federal government incentivized their adoption to the tune of billions of dollars five years ago. Four themes emerged from the panel, which included top executives from Johns Hopkins Medicine, athenahealth, PhRMA, and Carolinas HealthCare System.

 

1. Enhancing collaboration.

Electronic health records facilitate a team-based approach to hospital care, as well as allowing for better coordination between hospital systems. “What we’re going to see is it’s going to drive team-based clinical care because everyone in the system will have access to the same medical records,” said Dr. Paul Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Vice President for Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University and Chief Executive Officer at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You’re going to see an [increased] level of collaboration not only between delivery systems, but also between the patient and the health care provider.”

However, Ed Park, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, athenahealth, warned that the decades-old technologies that many hospital systems are using are limited in their capabilities. “The current crop of [electronic health records] are documentation tools instead of care management tools,” he said, adding that they are primarily for use by insurers and lawyers. “What I fear is health systems beginning to buy their way into their own prisons that are built of their own IT…as opposed to dealing in an open environment,” he said.

 

2. Enabling patient-centered care.

Electronic health records enable patients to reap greater benefits from telehealth. “Having your information on your iPhone: that’s not far away,” Dr. Rothman said. “[Patients are] going to do EKG’s at home. They’re going to be measuring their blood sugar at home. The patient will have control of the data.”

Electronic records also hold the promise of helping to solve age-old problems in the U.S. health care system, including keeping contact with patients to encourage them to take prescribed treatment regimens. “There is almost $350 billion a year in inefficiency because of lack of compliance and adherence with medications,” said John Castellani, President and Chief Executive Officer, PhRMA. “If you could just get an improvement in whether patients take the medicines that are prescribed, you could capture this great savings.”

“You have kids who have kidney transplants, and you can give them reminders on Facebook that they have to take their medications,” Dr. Rothman added.

 

3. Targeting therapies for increased success.

Electronic medical records can help health care providers ensure that they prescribe the treatments most likely to work for their patients.

“What I think is the promise of electronic medical records is our ability to find subsets of diseases through the broad diseases we treat,” Dr. Rothman said. “Asthma isn’t one disease. Obesity isn’t one disease. Diabetes isn’t one disease. We are going to be able to find subsets of diseases and target therapies [that work]. That’s when you’re going to see efficiency and return on investment.”

 

4. Harnessing the power of big data.

Our health care system has already begun to see the benefits of ‘big data’ with examples such as the discovery of drug side effects and interactions through mining consumer web search data. “We have to use the technologies to bring down the cost of the drug discovery process,” Castellani said.

“Just taking care of the patient, we capture data,” said Dr. Roger Ray, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carolinas HealthCare System. “That allows us to know when a patient…may be at risk for hospital readmission. Having the ability to mine [data]…makes a difference for patients.

“We all, each of us, remember with longing a simpler time when we could scribble and walk off and our job was done,” he added. “What we know now is that’s not very good for the patient. We had no standardization allowing us to help patients avoid lots of different bad outcomes they could have.”

 

Have electronic medical records impacted your health or that of your patients? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Why We Give to HealthWell Foundation – and Why You Should Too

As the head of a communications strategy shop that helps clients in science, technology, and health care, I encounter a seemingly endless number of organizations that want to do good for society and the planet.  Why then have the WHITECOAT Strategies employees – who serve as editors of Real World Health Care (RWHC) Blog – decided that the HealthWell Foundation should be one of our two charter charities, as our firm becomes a social enterprise in 2014?

David Sheon

David Sheon

Before I answer that, just what is a social enterprise?

A social enterprise is an organization that applies business strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being, rather than maximizing profits for shareholders.

Social enterprises can be structured as for-profit or non-profit organizations, but their focus is using their proceeds to do good.

We decided that organizations seeking communications firms would like to know that revenue from their work is going to help society.  And our employees like to know that too.

When we made the decision to become a social enterprise, we thought about the impact of our work globally and locally.  And that’s how we arrived at helping CA Bikes, as well as the HealthWell Foundation.

CA Bikes is a nonprofit organization founded by Chris Ategeka, a native of Uganda. The oldest of five children, Chris became an orphan and head of his household at an early age after losing both his parents to HIV/AIDS. After years of poverty and laboring in the fields, a miracle happened, as Chris says, when a woman from the United States started an organization called Y.E.S. Uganda near his village, took him in, and supported him through school. Now, Chris holds a BS and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Many people living in rural Africa have no access to emergency medical services, and given that the nearest health clinic or hospital is often miles away, this results in needless suffering and deaths. CA Bikes builds and distributes bicycle and motorcycle ambulances to rural African villages and trains partners in their maintenance and use to provide access to life-saving care during medical emergencies. For more information about CA Bikes and to help support their work, click here.

The WHITECOAT team is honored to help Chris fulfill the mission of CA Bikes.

WHITECOAT’s history with the HealthWell Foundation dates to a discussion one of my staff members and I had over three years ago.  She told me that her best friend from college had been diagnosed with a brain tumor. He had insurance through his job, which stuck with him through the medical emergency.  His wife had been laid off of her job a month before the diagnosis.  The emotional toll of the diagnosis was awful.  I knew the couple and their children would find their own way to deal with that and there was nothing we could do. But I felt that perhaps we could do something more to find them financial support.

One call to the HealthWell Foundation was all that was needed.  After reviewing financial records and evaluating the situation, the Foundation tapped a fund reserved for medical emergencies that reimbursed not only for the co-pays associated with medication, but also for the cost of the monthly health insurance premium and related medical expenses.  This program has now transformed into the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund, which WHITECOAT is proud to help launch for HealthWell.

HealthWell has awarded more than 265,000 grants to patients in over 40 disease categories, making a profound difference to over 165,000 people faced with difficult medical circumstances in the U.S.

I hope that at this time of giving, you’ll join me and the WHITECOAT staff by donating to the HealthWell Foundation.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Turning DASH Strategy into Reality for Improved Cardio Wellness Outcomes: Part II

As part of their health & wellness program, the largest health insurer sent me a refrigerator magnet highlighting the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Diet (DASH).  In their accompanying letter, the company stated that the refrigerator magnet is a “tool to help you manage your blood pressure.”

Shawn J. Green

Shawn J. Green

The DASH Eating Plan refrigerator magnet was a nice gesture to remind clients to consume less sodium and incorporate more vegetables and fruits into their diet to lower blood pressure.  However, is this the most effective wellness tool to engage and motivate individuals to change their eating habits?

As we learned in last week’s post, plant-based diets – especially those rich in leafy greens, such as spinach and arugula – elevate cardio-protective nitric oxide.  For many pre-hypertensive individuals, staying with a plant-based diet is a critical driver to prevent elevated blood pressure and the diseases associated with hypertension.

Yet many Americans continue to fall far short of eating recommended daily servings of vegetables that elevate natural nitric oxide levels in our body.

A new model is needed to drive behavioral change. So how do we consistently integrate cardio-protective plant-based diets into our daily dietary lifestyle?

Berkeley Test may be a start.

Berkeley Test’s Saliva Nitric Oxide Test Strips and its iPhone Cardio Diet Tracker are designed to break bad habits and empower folks from various walks of life to incorporate plant-based foods into their daily diets.  These engaging tools provide a model to influence dietary change on a personal level that supports lasting compliance with measurable outcomes.

Designed to detect nitric oxide status in the body throughout the day, Berkeley Test developed the next generation proprietary nitric oxide test strip; for less than 70-cents, an easy-to-use, 1-minute saliva test strip enables consumers to make immediate and real-time dietary lifestyle adjustments.

Once users finish the strip test, they can use Berkeley Test’s Cardio Diet Tracker App to compare their results to a color-coded indicator showing whether nitric oxide levels are on target. After 2-3 hours, the user is alerted to check their nitric oxide status.  Users can leverage the Cardio Diet Tracker App to more effectively adhere to plant-based diets by tracking nitric oxide status in conjunction with the type, frequency, and amount of nitric oxide-potent foods eaten to sustain their levels.

Michael Greger, M.D., of NutritionFacts.org, suggests that Berkeley Test may offer hope by bringing plant-based foods into our dietary lifestyle in an engaging fashion. At the very least, it will remind us to eat our greens on a more frequent basis, he says.

Berkeley’s strip-app bundled technologies demonstrate that self-assessing, analyzing, and fine-tuning wellness outcomes with a shared, open, interactive community can be a catalyst to sustain plant-based cardio-protective diets in our daily lifestyle. The value of Berkeley Test’s model is not only demonstrated in how it equips consumers to make healthier dietary choices, but also in its ability to connect users by allowing them to share dietary successes with their Facebook friends.  In today’s society, wellness outcomes and fitness is highly social and valued.

Individuals – who range from Olympians seeking to boost their physical endurance to baby boomers looking for an easier way to eat healthfully and prevent high blood pressure – are embracing these innovations.  As more people turn to Berkeley’s strip and mobile App to improve adherence to plant-based diets, such as DASH and Ornish, natural communities of mutual support are growing.  These networks offer a unique venue to share experiences, provide strategies for success and a forum to discuss common challenges, refine approaches and achieve desired outcomes.

A dynamically open community to share new knowledge about wellness and create a model for achieving and maintaining healthy living and eating is what we hope Berkeley’s ‘health biomarker’ test strips (such as nitric oxide and mobile App combo) provides.

So, what is your nitric oxide level, today?

With a Little Help from My Friends, Family… And Apps

“Drugs don’t work in patients who don’t take them.” – C. Everett Koop, former Surgeon General

It was an idea born of near tragedy: an elderly, diabetic father who double-dosed on his insulin therapy and suffered a medical emergency. His two sons realized that if they were more involved in reviewing their father’s daily medication and insulin regimens, it could change his behavior for the better and help him get healthier.

MedicineCabinet (5)

Photos courtesy of NextGen Healthcare

So Omri and Rotem Shor co-founded the MediSafe Project, a free mobile app that makes it easier for families and friends to give the support needed to help their loved ones get healthier and integrate healthier behavior modification into their everyday lives. In the first four months after its launch, users reported medication adherence rates of 79 percent (82.25 percent for statins) – well above the 50 percent average medication adherence rate reported by the World Health Organization.

The MediSafe Project provides an easy-to-use interface – an interactive pillbox of sorts — over iOS and Android mobile phones. Users input information about their meds by typing their names or photographing their National Drug Code numbers. The system stores the correct pharmaceutical name, manufacturer and dosage, ensuring an error-free medication list in the event of a medical emergency. Users signify taking their meds by dragging pills from the virtual pillbox into a mouth icon, which “swallows” the pills.

Users receive alerts before medication courses are completed, allowing them to order refills in a timely manner. In addition to reminding users when it’s time to take their medication, the MediSafe Project sends alerts to selected family members, friends and caretakers when a loved one misses a dose. Users can also email a personalized list of adherence stats to their doctor, giving doctors better patient oversight between office visits. A prescription page feature lets doctors “prescribe” the MediSafe project to their patients to help better monitor medication adherence.

The impact of non-adherence on the outcomes of patients with cardiovascular diseases is one example that underscores why it is so critical to implement strategies and utilize technologies that improve medication adherence.

“Medication non-adherence is a problem that costs U.S. hospitals billions of dollars every year,” says Omri “Bob” Shor, CEO, MediSafe. “An American dies every nineteen minutes from skipping or taking medication incorrectly. Our goal is to help combat this problem and encourage healthy habits among users and their support systems with easy-to-use technology.”

The MediSafe Project isn’t the only app on the medication adherence scene. The free NextGen® MedicineCabinet app lets users create and update a list of medications, including dosing and schedule information, thus creating their own “personal” medication record.

Notifications are sent for each medication and users can confirm adherence. The app was designed, in part, to improve adherence and proper use of medication by enhancing patients’ understanding of how to correctly take their medication and to recognize adverse reactions. According to the company, it also equips health care professionals with all the relevant information they need, in a way they like to view it.

“Mobile patient engagement is at the forefront of today’s changing health care environment,” said Ike Ellison, executive vice president of business development for NextGen Healthcare, in a statement. “Providing consumer technology that encourages members to control and lead healthier lifestyles is a key factor in improving outcomes.”

Michael Paquin, vice president, business development for NextGen Healthcare, added “One of our users commented on the way that she was able to, for the first time, be able to share her medication lists easily with family, friends and all her physicians. It has saved this particular patient hours of time on a monthly basis.”

Technology-based solutions like the MediSafe Project and the NextGen Medicine Cabinet are among the latest patient-directed tools that improve medication adherence.

However, providers still play an important role in assisting patients in maintaining healthy behaviors like medication adherence. The American College of Preventive Medicine offers a SIMPLE approach on how providers can help their patients take their medications as prescribed.

Barriers to medication compliance abound, with memory issues, lack of support, and lack of education just being a few. What is behind these barriers? How can patient behaviors and motivations be changed?

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Categories: Access to Care

New Drug Delivery Options that Help the Medicine Go Down

David Sheon

David Sheon

The water cooler talk for us at RWHC is frequently about improving treatment adherence (a patient’s ability and willingness to take his or her medicine consistently, as directed).  OK, so we don’t have the most exciting water cooler discussions.  But this happens to be important – for all of us because when patients stay on treatment, they get better faster.  This is almost universally true, regardless of the therapeutic category.

In some cases, improving adherence not only saves the life of the patient, but it can benefit an entire community.  In HIV, for example, taking antiretrovirals not only helps the patient to manage his or her viral load (the amount of HIV circulating in the blood), but it also lowers that patient’s ability to transmit the virus to someone else.

Sometimes, adherence can be improved by using a different delivery system.  This is the first post in a series on how drug delivery helps adherence.

Remember the first time you took a breath strip that dissolved on your tongue? The technology was invented in the 1970s, but only since July 2012 have pharmaceutical companies been able to win marketing approval to put a drug on the strip.  Two products have been cleared by the FDA.

Zuplenz (ondansetron) oral soluble film is an anti-nausea and vomiting product used by cancer patients who experience nausea and vomiting as a result of receiving chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

“We know from market research that patients who are nauseated don’t necessarily like swallowing pills or using suppositories and that sometimes taking pills with water contributes to their nausea,” said John V. Aiken, M. Ed., Vice President, Corporate Operations, Marketing, and Training, Praelia Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  “Since launching the product in December 2012, a number of doctors are telling us that their patients prefer the dissolving strip.”

The second drug now available on an oral dissolving strip is Suboxone (Buprenorphine and Naloxone), from Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Inc.  For more information on this product, click here.

If the dosing is standardized and absorption is as good as more typical drug delivery methods, we see only an upside in terms of patient adherence to oral dissolving strips.  Please tell us what you think.  Also, if you know of a new drug delivery option that you’d like to see us cover, let us know!