Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: prevention

Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover

Editor’s Note: February is American Heart Month, sponsored by the American Heart Association. While some may think heart problems are primarily a concern of the middle-aged and older, one out of every 100 kids has a heart condition. Simon’s Fund was established in 2005 in memory of Simon, son of Phyllis and Darren Sudman. The organization provides free heart screenings to children in the Greater Philadelphia area. It also sponsors medical research projects, hosts awareness events, works with major medical institutions and promotes legislation. We’ve invited Simon’s dad to share his thoughts in this week’s blog post.

Last year, many parents in the Greater Philadelphia area learned what I learned ten years ago – sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) isn’t just an adult thing. It takes the lives of thousands of children every year.

Simon Sudman

Simon Sudman

Two students, an eighth grader from Mount Laurel, N.J., and a first grader from Philadelphia, collapsed and died from cardiac arrest.

In 2005, my son, Simon died suddenly. He was a baby so most people told me it was SIDS. Our pediatrician, however, was a bit wiser. She said, “Get your hearts checked because babies don’t just die.” Following her advice, we got tested. My wife, Phyllis, was diagnosed with a heart condition called Long QT Syndrome. It’s an arrhythmia that is linked to 15 percent of all SIDS deaths.

My heart breaks for these two families. The obvious reason is that there is a gaping void in their life now. It may narrow over time, but it will always be there. There is nothing more painful or unjust than losing a child. We all know that life is unfair, but it’s not supposed to be this unfair.

The less obvious reason is that I’ve dedicated the last decade to raising awareness about sudden cardiac arrest in children so that other parents wouldn’t have to take this path. I wanted them to be smarter so they could do a better job of protecting their children. Apparently, I failed. I let these families down.

Now, they’re walking in my shoes wondering how, in the 21st century, their child can die from a detectable and treatable heart condition. Think about that. It’s not a rare disease. We don’t need billions of dollars to find a cure. We have the technology. We have the treatments. We just need to look. We need to be a little curious, like my pediatrician was 10 years ago.

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The Journal of American Board of Family Medicine published a study in 2012 showing that 72 percent of all students that died from SCA reported having symptoms from the underlying heart conditions. I’ve met students who reported symptoms like a racing heart or fainting. They were later diagnosed with heart conditions. Prior to their diagnosis, their symptoms were dismissed as drinking too much soda and being dehydrated, respectively. The signs were there. We almost let those kids down. We need to be a little more curious…a little wiser.

SCA happens when the heart stops beating, suddenly and unexpectedly. It is not a heart attack. That’s what happens when blood can’t get to the heart. The conditions that cause SCA in children come in two varieties: structural and electrical.

Here are the warning signs: 1) fainting or seizures during or immediately after exercise, 2) unexplained shortness of breath, 3) dizziness during exercise, 4) extreme fatigue, and 5) a racing heart. Also, parents should be aware if a family member has died suddenly and unexpectedly before the age of 50.

So what’s next? The experts will debate the merits of making heart screenings a standard of care, while we continue to provide free eye and ear exams to students in schools. The lawmakers will debate the merits of placing AED devices in schools, even though each is already equipped with life-saving measures like fire alarms, sprinkler systems and security systems. However, starting tomorrow, we, the parents, can be more diligent and less dismissive about the warning signs of the underlying conditions.

My seemingly healthy baby, who was average height and weight and scored an 8 and 9 on his Apgar tests (used to quickly and summarily assess the health of newborn children immediately after birth), had an undetected heart condition. These two boys, energetic and vibrant students, described as “one of the kids everybody knew,” and “shy, funny and loveable,” had undetected heart conditions. The answers may be right in front of us. We just need to look.

As children, we learn not to judge a book by its cover. Remember, we need to look at what’s on the inside. It’s time to realize this saying applies to our children’s hearts too.

Do you agree that heart screenings should be standard for children? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section.

The 21st Century Cures Initiative…And a Bold Plan

David Sheon

David Sheon

The one thing that Democrats and Republicans in the House of Representatives agree on is that they just don’t agree. It’s an old, tired state of affairs and the resulting gridlock affects everything from education to crime to defense. Thanks to two typical party rivals, this unfortunate paradigm may be shifting…all in the name of health and science.

Fred Upton (R-Michigan) and Diane DeGette (D-Colorado) have set aside their differences and joined together to lead the 21st Century Cures Initiative. The initiative marks the first time in memory that Congress is taking a comprehensive look at what steps can be taken to accelerate the pace of cures in America. With the backing of the Energy & Commerce Committee (which Rep. Upton chairs), The House of Representatives is looking at “the full arc of this process – from the discovery of clues in basic science, to streamlining the drug and device development process, to unleashing the power of digital medicine and social media at the treatment delivery phase.”

In a recent bylined article in The Hill, a newspaper read by members of Congress and their staff, Jim Greenwood, President and CEO of the Biotechnology Industry Organization, offers an idea that could take hold in the spirit of this ember of bipartisanship. His idea includes potential funding for a massive, long-term research study that will involve over 100,000 Americans and examine some of the most devastating diseases, including Alzheimers. Part of the study will be to identify biomarkers common to those who develop the diseases, which will then lead to cures. Once a biomarker is identified, drugs can be developed that hit that biomarker.

Mr. Greenwood, once a member of Congress himself, addressed the Upton-DeGette initiative during the Rare Disease and Orphan Product Breakthrough Summit held by the National Organization for Rare Disorders that convened in Alexandria, Virginia earlier this week.

Mr. Greenwood pointed out that many scientists have failed to find cures to diseases like Alzheimer’s because by the time the patient shows symptoms, the neurological damage is already done. His long-term biomarker study is designed to overcome this hurdle. Greenwood challenged the conference attendees to help think through how this could work to develop cures for rare diseases as well.

The 21st Century Cures Initiative recognizes that innovation is happening at lightning speed. From the mapping of the human genome to the rise of personalized medicines that are linked to advances in molecular medicine, constant breakthroughs are changing the face of disease treatment, management, and cures. Health research is moving quickly, but the federal drug and device approval apparatus is not keeping pace. And when the laws don’t keep up with the innovation, we all lose.

Representatives Upton and DeGette recognize that for more lives to be saved, Congress will need to take a comprehensive look at the process of getting drugs to market – from discovery to development to delivery with the simple goal of saving lives. Add Mr. Greenwood’s idea into the mix, and we may be able to save billions of dollars that would otherwise go to the long-term treatment of Alzheimer’s patients. More importantly, we could save millions of patients and their families the painful loss caused by the disease.

This makes so much sense that not even Congress can disagree. Will you tell your member of Congress to support this bipartisan initiative?  What do you think of it?

UV Safety Month: Shedding Light on Melanoma Treatment and Prevention

In 2014, an approximate 77,000 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma, culminating in nearly 10,000 deaths. Every eight minutes, an American is diagnosed with melanoma, and every hour, an American dies from it. Despite accounting for only four percent of all skin cancer cases, melanoma results in 80 percent of all skin cancer-related deaths. In observance of UV Safety Month, Real World Health Care is examining what’s working and what’s new in the prevention and treatment of melanoma.

photo (1)

Nathan Sheon

If detected early, melanoma is easily treated with surgery. If a tumor in the epidermis – the upper-most layer of skin – is removed before it deepens into the skin or spreads to other parts of the body, the likelihood of completely curing melanoma is high. When melanoma spreads, other treatment options include chemo- and radiation therapy.

Once melanoma has progressed to its later stages, however, treatment of the disease becomes much more difficult. For these patients, treatment options usually focus on extending life expectancy and improving quality of life.

Within the last few years, developments in melanoma research have provided promising leads on how to increase a patient’s lifespan beyond the capabilities of existing treatments. Certain activation immunotherapies – drugs that activate the immune system’s ability to fight disease – are showing potential in their ability to combat the spread of melanoma by killing tumors. Though these treatments do not work in all melanoma patients, in some cases they have been associated with unprecedented increases in lifespan.

“All of these trials involve late stage cancer patients. Suddenly we’re seeing those same patients getting two years or more survival time,” said Ashani Weeraratna of the Wistar Institute, the nation’s first independent institution devoted to medical research and training. “Enhancing the immune system such that it can effectively target and destroy your tumor has been a goal for many years. That’s [the field’s] big advance.”

Melanoma is almost always curable when detected and treated early on. Monthly self-examinations and yearly visits to the dermatologist are highly advised, even for those not predisposed to skin cancers. More information on how to perform a self-examination can be found online in guides from the Skin Cancer Foundation and the Melanoma Research Foundation.

Among other important measures like self-examinations and avoiding tanning booths, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) advises that wearing sunscreen when spending time outdoors is vital, especially during peak daylight hours between 10 AM to 2 PM. The AAD suggests using sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or above. With a range of sunscreen products on the market, choosing the right one can be difficult. Different products are more effective for different people depending on skin type. Visit the Skin Cancer Foundation’s guide for more information on choosing the right sunscreen product for you. For more information and tips on preventing and detecting melanoma, visit the AAD’s online guide.

How do you stay safe in the sun? Let us know in the comments section.

*Jamie Elizabeth Rosen, editor of Real World Health Care, contributed to this piece.

A Shot of Courage for Those Who Fear Needles

This is the first of a two-part series on what’s working to prevent and address needle fear.

Most people don’t enjoy shots.

But for those with needle phobia, the fear of shots can be so severe that they actively avoid medical procedures involving injections, and in extreme cases avoid medical care more generally.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Needle phobia can arise from genetic and environmental factors, including experiencing pain during encounters with needles or seeing others uncomfortable or distressed by needles. Studies show that approximately two out of three children and one in four adults are afraid of needles, and 10 percent of adults have an outright needle phobia, characterized by avoidance behavior and physiological responses, such as increased heart rate or fainting.

The miracle of modern medicine has enabled us to protect ourselves from a range of dangerous or life-threatening diseases. In one recent study, seven to eight percent of adults and children reported avoiding potentially life-saving immunizations as a result of needle fear. Given the growth of vaccine-preventable outbreaks throughout the world (check out this interactive map), this is not only a concern for individual health but also for public health.

Preventing and Addressing Needle Fear

Fortunately, a growing cadre of empathetic health professionals is taking the prevention of needle pain, which can trigger needle fear, to the next level.

“In order to combat pain, vascular access professionals across the country are looking at creative ways to address patient pain and patients’ perception of pain,” said nursing leader and vascular access expert Lorelle Wuerz, MSN, BS, BA, RN, VA-BC. “Offering the patient options before you do any procedure is important.”

Wuerz said that she uses a variety of interventions to combat needle fear and pain in patients, including:

  • Ensuring patients know what to expect;
  • Deep breathing;
  • Guided imagery;
  • Distraction techniques;
  • Topical agents;
  • Warm compresses;
  • Involvement of child life professionals;
  • Pain control devices, such as Buzzy®;
  • Aromatherapy (“Anecdotally, this is something patients find soothing and calming during an uneasy time,” Wuerz said.).

Needle pain prevention extends beyond traditional health care settings. For instance, after discovering that 23 percent of Americans who skipped flu vaccination did so to avoid needles, Target Pharmacy began offering micro-needle flu vaccines. The needles are 90% smaller than those that have traditionally been used and reportedly result in less muscle ache and pain immediately following injection.

“Treating needle pain reduces pain and distress and improves satisfaction with medical care,” wrote pain researcher Anna Taddio in a chapter on needle procedures in the Oxford Textbook of Paediatric Pain. “Other potential benefits include a reduction in the development of needle fear and subsequent health care avoidance behaviour.” 

The 4 Ps of Needle Pain Management

In the Oxford Textbook chapter, Taddio outlined the four domains of interventions that can reduce needle pain for patients, known as the 4 Ps: procedural, pharmacological, psychological, and physical.

Procedural interventions involve bypassing needles altogether through the use of needle-free immunization or non-invasive sampling devices. Pharmacological interventions include local anesthetics, which have been shown to be effective and safe for reducing pain from common needle procedures, and sweet solutions for infants up to 12 months, which have been shown to reduce needle pain behaviors. Psychological interventions include coaching people to cope and providing distractions. Physical interventions – such as upright body positioning, tactile stimulation, and use of cooling agents or ice – can also reduce the perception of needle pain.

Empowering Ourselves

Many people will celebrate the day when shots are replaced with futuristic technology, such as a robotic pill or one of many other innovations currently in development.

In the meantime, what can patients do to help themselves? “A patient should never not speak up,” Wuerz said. “It’s okay to have all of the information before you make a choice.”

Stay tuned for Part II of the series, in which Dr. Amy Baxter, MD – pain researcher, CEO of MMJ Labs, and inventor of Buzzy® Drug Free Pain Relief – will outline how you can protect yourself and your family from needle pain. Dr. Baxter will appear on ABC’s Shark Tank Friday, February 28 at 9:00 pm EST.

How do you respond to needles? What works for you? Have you had a good experience with a health care professional? Post your experiences to the comments section.

Three Ways You Can Reduce the Impact of Cardiovascular Disease this American Heart Month

Most of the readers of this blog know that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer of men and women in this country. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, CVD is a leading cause of disability, preventing Americans from working and enjoying family activities. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests cause the deaths of an estimated 250,000 Americans each year. CVD costs the United States over $300 billion each year.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

There are many small but significant actions we can take. Here is what you can do to make a difference: empower or continue to empower patients to take care of themselves.

1. Address the cost of heart medication

If the cost of your medicine is an issue, talk to your doctor or contact a patient assistance program that may be able to help with prescription co-pays.

2. Encourage healthy behaviors

Want people to eat better? Give them coupons for healthy food. Exercise? Give them coupons for short-term memberships to health clubs.

The stakes are higher in our country’s current health care landscape. With more people on health insurance than ever before, we need to do everything we can to empower people to seek help before an emergency and talk to their doctor about what they can do to take better care of themselves. This will have a direct effect on deaths from heart disease.

3. Ask your employer about Automatic External Defibrillators

There are instances in which individuals are dealt devastating genetic hands of cards. Recently, the Philadelphia Inquirer highlighted the plight of a Philadelphia family that had a genetic link to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle.

For those who do experience heart issues, or even have a major event such as cardiac arrest, Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) devices can significantly increase the likelihood of survival. AEDs have been available for over 20 years, but in recent years, device makers have reduced the size and cost and increased usability of defibrillators, making public access defibrillation viable. “We believe ease of use is one of the most important qualities in an AED because the potential user may not be well-trained in resuscitating a victim of sudden cardiac arrest,” said Bob Peterhans, General Manager for Emergency Care and Resuscitation at Philips Healthcare. “This is consistent with the American Heart Association’s criteria for choosing an AED.”

While risk factors for CVD are often genetic, the majority of CVD is triggered by factors that are controllable: smoking, diet, and exercise. And this is where individual efforts need to be focused.

For more information on preventing CVD, check out the American Heart Association’s guidelines for taking care of your heart, which are broken down by age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also offer an American Heart Month guide to controlling risk factors for cardiovascular disease. You may also want to check out The Heart Truth, a campaign from the National Institutes of Health to make women more aware of the danger of heart disease.

Read more Real World Health Care heart health-related posts:

Are you taking steps to prevent cardiovascular disease? If you, a family member, or a friend has CVD, what is working for treatment? Share your experiences and insights in the comments section.

Smoking Out Nicotine Addiction: What’s Working in the War on Cigarettes

With CVS Pharmacy’s recent announcement that cigarettes and other tobacco containing products will no longer be sold in its stores, Real World Health Care has been crunching the numbers on the success of anti-tobacco efforts and reviewing recent advances in smoking cessation. Here’s what we’ve found:

  • #1. Smoking still holds the unfortunate distinction of causing more preventable deaths than anything else.
  • 8 million. That’s how many lives have been saved by 50 years of anti-smoking efforts, according to a recent study by researchers from Yale University.

    Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

    Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

  • 19%. That’s the current smoking rate in the U.S., down from a whopping 42% five decades ago when U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry published the first report on the negative health impacts of smoking.
  • 3,000. The number of young people who still try their first cigarette every day. Almost 700 become regular smokers.
  • 7,600. The number of store locations that will no longer sell tobacco products as a result of CVS’s decision. Under the Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration cannot mandate what retailers sell, although interestingly it does have the power to mandate the amount of nicotine in cigarettes in addition to advertising restrictions and general standards for tobacco production

Public consciousness, regulation, and education on the harmful effects of tobacco are all factors in the tremendous progress that has been made in saving lives. The World Health Organization’s global recommendations for tobacco control are known as the MPOWER measures and include the following:

WHO_MPOWER

With the efforts of both public and private sector actors, 2014 could be a watershed year for tobacco control in the U.S. In addition to CVS’s tobacco ban, several new initiatives on the part of the government and private industry have already been announced this year that address components of MPOWER:

  • Earlier this month, the FDA launched a new media campaign targeting youth. “We are addressing one of the biggest public health problems in this country and in the world,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said. “It’s something the FDA has not really done before in terms of a broad public health campaign of this magnitude but it’s something that we are so pleased to be doing because it matters for health.”
  • Walgreens and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Consumer Healthcare announced a smoking cessation initiative. Along with resources to help quit smoking, Walgreens’ new Sponsorship to Quit provides smokers with 24/7 tips and tools, celebrations for milestones, a free consultation and other valuable support systems for smokers in their journey to quit. MinuteClinic also provides online tips, tools and facts to help smokers kick their habits.

Have you or anyone you know succeeded in quitting smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products? Have you seen an effective campaign against tobacco? Post to the comments section to share your impressions of what works.

Are You Ready to Help Stop Cervical Cancer?

National patient advocacy organizations and allies are urging American women to start the year off right by learning more about cervical cancer and prevention during Cervical Health Awareness Month this January.  Here’s what you need to know.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Although enormous strides have been made in the prevention of cervical cancer – which has gone from being the number-one cause of cancer death among American women in the 1950s to now ranking 14th for all cancers impacting U.S. women – much work remains in the fight to end this disease. Cervical cancer is still a major health concern, with approximately 12,000 women diagnosed each year in the United States and more than 4,000 women who die from the disease annually.

Cervical cancer is primarily caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus in the U.S. impacting 79 million Americans. While HPV is most often the cause, other identified risk factors can include:

  • Smoking;
  • Having HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system;
  • Prolonged (five or more years) use of birth control;
  • Three or more full-term pregnancies; and
  • Having several or more sexual partners.

While many of these factors don’t always lead to cervical cancer, it’s been shown that the risk of acquiring the disease can be decreased through frequent screening. Once women began regularly getting Pap tests and HPV vaccinations, for example, deaths resulting from cervical cancer decreased by nearly 70 percent in the United States from 1955-1992.

Cervical cancer is preventable because of the availability of a vaccine for HPV and effective screening tests, according to an announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month last year. Although highly treatable, the CDC shows that half of all cervical cancer cases occur in women who rarely or never were screened for cancer. In another 10-20 percent of cases, patients were screened but did not receive adequate follow-up care. The CDC has also issued information regarding the availability and importance of preventative HPV vaccines.

The National Cervical Cancer Coalition (NCCC) and the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) also advocate for increased awareness of the disease. In its promotion of the event the NCCC provides numerous suggestions on how to spread the word, including:

  • Enlist radio stations to issue PSAs;
  • Share tweets and Facebook posts to educate their networks;
  • Distribute ASHA/NCCC’s news release to local media, with a guide on how to reach out to media networks; and
  • Write to their mayors or local legislative offices to recognize Cervical Health Awareness Month.

It’s also important for providers to know how to most effectively engage families with girls, according to ASHA/NCCC President and CEO Lynn B. Barclay.

“Only about 35 percent of girls and young women who are eligible for these vaccines have completed the three-dose series,” Barclay says. “Parents are strongly influenced by the recommendations of the family doctor or nurse, so we’ll continue developing cervical cancer information and counseling tools designed specifically for health professionals.“

Now we want to hear from you. How can you increase awareness about cervical cancer in your communities? What can organizations, places of employment and other stakeholders do to help heighten visibility around cervical cancer prevention strategies?

Editorial Note: At press time, information regarding expected estimates of cervical cancer rates in the U.S. for 2014 had not been released. Please note that we will include the latest statistics as soon as data becomes available.

Get Your Flu Shot Now to Stay Healthier Later

So you think you’re too busy to get your flu shot? It’s easy to put off, but taking the time to do it sooner rather than later could prevent you from getting sick while helping to protect those you care about – during the holidays and beyond. That’s why the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments as well as other health agencies are raising visibility around National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), from Dec. 8-14.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

With the flu season beginning in the fall and not peaking until January-February, it’s certainly not too late to get your influenza shot. In fact, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that everyone 6 months of age or older receive it, including:

  • Children
  • Seniors 65 and older
  • Pregnant women
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives
  • Those with underlying health conditions like asthma
  • Those living with conditions including chronic lung disease, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer and diabetes

Although the effectiveness of flu vaccination varies each year, the CDC reports that recent studies demonstrate the evidence-based public health benefits. The Mayo Clinic agrees, calling flu shots your best defense against the flu, enabling “your body to develop the antibodies necessary to ward off influenza viruses.”

“The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year,” said CDC’s Anne Schuchat, M.D., Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “Today, flu vaccines are available in more convenient locations than ever. The few minutes it takes to get a flu vaccine can save you from experiencing several unproductive days due to influenza. The most common side effects are mild and short-lasting, especially when compared to symptoms of influenza infection.  Flu vaccine cannot cause flu illness.”

Despite evidence that the influenza vaccine is an effective tool, some still fear that getting their shot might put them at risk for experiencing severe side effects. No more than one or two cases per million people vaccinated acquire Guillain-Barré syndrome, an outcome much lower than the risk of developing severe complications from influenza. From 1976-2006, in fact, estimates show that far more people died from flu-associated deaths in the U.S. (3,000-49,000) than from negative reactions to the vaccines that protect against influenza.

To build awareness and support of NIVW and encourage people to get their shots, the CDC is making a rich variety of online tools and resources available to a wide spectrum of patients, educators and providers, such as:

Partnering with Reckitt Benckiser, Inc., the makers of LYSOL® Brand Products, the CDC is also spotlighting the Ounce of Prevention Campaign, which seeks to empower consumers and professionals with practical tips and information around effective hand hygiene and cleaning habits to prevent infectious diseases like the flu.

Click here to see if the vaccine is available in your area. To find a nearby location to get the vaccine, check out HHS’s “Flu Vaccine Finder” on Flu.gov, enter your ZIP code and share the widget to let your family members, colleagues and friends know where they can go too. HHS also provides a series of informative YouTube videos that cover prevention strategies, share tips for identifying symptoms and provide recommended treatment practices.

You can also make a powerful statement by taking the pledge to get vaccinated for the 2013-14 season, commit to taking a friend with you and in the process spread the word by clicking here. To get the latest updates on flu vaccination efforts, follow the CDC on Twitter (@CDCFlu and @CDCgov) and “like” them on Facebook.

Now tell us if you’ve gotten your flu shot. Where did you go? How long did it take? What ways could providers and health care stakeholders more effectively remind patients to get vaccinated?

Advocates Unite to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes During National Diabetes Awareness Month

One in three. That’s the number of people in the United States who will have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue. Twenty-six million Americans – seven million of which are undiagnosed – now live with diabetes and another 79 million have pre-diabetes. To raise awareness and spotlight effective prevention strategies, patient advocates are mobilizing to promote National Diabetes Awareness Month and American Diabetes Month® this November.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

As a disease that constitutes one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, diabetes is a disease in which glucose blood levels are elevated above their normal range. Those living with diabetes are also at higher risk of heart disease and stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being 45 years of age or older
  • Being overweight
  • Having a family history of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Engaging in physical activity fewer than three times per week
  • Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy)

Although type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented because people are born with it, individuals can lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through a variety of practical strategies. The CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based program for preventing type 2 diabetes. A public-private partnership of community organizations, private insurers, employers, health care organizations and government agencies, it teaches participants how they can incorporate physical activity into daily life and eat more healthfully, helping them to:

  • Cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half
  • Lose 5-7 percent of body weight through modest changes in behavior
  • Reduce the risk of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes by 5 percent

The program pairs people with a lifestyle coach, in a group setting, to receive 16 core sessions and six post-core sessions over the course of a year. These lifestyle coaches work with the participants to identify emotions and situations that can sabotage their success. The group process encourages participants to share approaches for dealing with challenging situations.

Along with their National Diabetes Prevention program, the CDC also provides a Registry of Recognized Programs that lists contact information for community resources offering type 2 diabetes prevention programs. The registry was created to help health care providers more effectively refer their patients to the services they need, while also empowering patients to find and choose the programs that are right for them. For more information about diabetes and other diseases from CDC, you can sign up for e-mail updates here.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is also committed to raising awareness and providing resources around issues such as diabetes risk, family support, and community support. The goal of their campaign – Control Your Diabetes. For Life is to increase awareness about the benefits of diabetes control through education materials, fact sheets, sample articles and PSAs for radio, print and television. A major part of their focus is also placed upon bringing diabetes information to community settings such as schools, worksites, senior centers and places of worship.

“Although the prevalence of diabetes has continued to rise due to the obesity epidemic, the aging of the U.S. population, and increasing numbers of people at high risk for diabetes, there are strong, encouraging indicators of progress in preventing and treating diabetes,” said Joanne Gallivan, M.S., R.D., Director of NDEP. “Today, there is much greater awareness that diabetes is a serious disease, a critical first step in changing outcomes. In 1997, only 8 percent of Americans believed diabetes was serious. In 2011, 84 percent of Americans understood that it is a serious disease.”

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), which works to “raise awareness of this ever growing disease,” leverages American Diabetes Month® to illustrate how diabetes impacts Americans. By asking people to submit photos that show “A Day in the Life of Diabetes,” the ADA plans to create a large mosaic that demonstrates how diabetes affects patients, families and communities nationwide from personal perspectives.

“Participating in ‘A Day in the Life of Diabetes’ for individuals living with diabetes lets them know that the American Diabetes Association is the one leading organization that continues to do research to ‘STOP Diabetes,’ advocate and promote ‘Healthy Lifestyle Management’ to avoid many of the health issues that people with diabetes die from, such as heart disease or stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and amputations,” said Lurelean B. Gaines, RN, MSN, President of Health Care and Education of the Association. “The campaign has grown this year and will continue to grow because every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes.”

To learn more visit ADA’s website at www.diabetes.org and click on Diabetes Basics, Living With Diabetes, Food Fitness, Advocate, In My Community, or News & Research.  Information is available in English and Spanish. You can also “like” ADA on Facebook, follow them on Twitter (@AMDiabetesAssn) or call them at 1-800-Diabetes.

How can your community more effectively collaborate with stakeholders like ADA, CDC and NDEP to prevent diabetes and help those living with the disease?

Groundbreaking Report Spotlights Benefits of Going Green for Hospitals

The Healthier Hospitals Initiative (HHI), a program that encourages hospitals to go healthier for patients by going greener, is marking its one-year anniversary by releasing the first-ever report (2012 Milestone Report) that quantifies the success of sustainability initiatives among hospitals in the U.S. and Canada.

HHI is made up of 13 sponsoring health systems and three nonprofit organizations including Health Care Without Harm, The Center for Health Design and Practice Greenhealth. As we reported in June, many hospitals are exploring ways to lower costs through environmentally friendly options and sustainable energy strategies.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

“The HHI Milestone report shows that hospitals are increasingly embedding sustainability into their core operating system,” said Gary Cohen, President of Health Care Without Harm and Founder of HHI.  “HHI also offers hospitals a powerful way to meet the Triple Aim of improving the patient experience, addressing population health and lower their costs.”

The report demonstrates how the green efforts of 370 hospitals are translating to substantial cost-savings and a reduction in waste. In addition to recycling more than 50 million pounds of materials and saving approximately $32 million from single-use medical device reprocessing, the report also found that participating hospitals are:

  • Preventing 61 million pounds of waste from going to landfills (among 44 member hospitals).
  • Creating more healthful meals for their patients by limiting overall meat intake, decreasing the amount of meat served by 10 percent from 2010-12.
  • Increasing the overall amount of money spent on healthful beverages from 10 percent to 62 percent.
  • One hospital reported purchasing more environmentally friendly cleaning supplies, spending on average more than 37.75 percent of their cleaning supply budgets on green cleaning products.

“At Practice Greenhealth, our strength comes from the collective expertise and knowledge that members bring to the table about what works to make our health care more sustainable,” said Laura Wenger, RN, Executive Director of Practice Greenhealth. “HHI’s 2012 Milestone Report is proof that hospitals of all sizes benefit from this wisdom.”

The Commonwealth Fund 2012 report found that if health care organizations, such as hospitals, adopted sustainable practices, industry savings could add up to an estimated $5.4 billion in 5 years and more than $15 billion over 10 years.  The study also concludes that health systems that embrace green initiatives are examples for the health care system as a whole to follow.

“As part of a preventive approach to controlling chronic disease, increasing numbers of hospitals have committed to minimizing adverse environmental impact of their operations on patients, staff, and the community, serving as role models for the health sector and society at large,” the study authors noted.

Are health systems in your community embracing green initiatives? What do you see as the major barriers to more hospitals going green and what incentives could be created to overcome these challenges?

Categories: Cost-Savings