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Are You Ready to Help Stop Cervical Cancer?

National patient advocacy organizations and allies are urging American women to start the year off right by learning more about cervical cancer and prevention during Cervical Health Awareness Month this January.  Here’s what you need to know.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Although enormous strides have been made in the prevention of cervical cancer – which has gone from being the number-one cause of cancer death among American women in the 1950s to now ranking 14th for all cancers impacting U.S. women – much work remains in the fight to end this disease. Cervical cancer is still a major health concern, with approximately 12,000 women diagnosed each year in the United States and more than 4,000 women who die from the disease annually.

Cervical cancer is primarily caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus in the U.S. impacting 79 million Americans. While HPV is most often the cause, other identified risk factors can include:

  • Smoking;
  • Having HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system;
  • Prolonged (five or more years) use of birth control;
  • Three or more full-term pregnancies; and
  • Having several or more sexual partners.

While many of these factors don’t always lead to cervical cancer, it’s been shown that the risk of acquiring the disease can be decreased through frequent screening. Once women began regularly getting Pap tests and HPV vaccinations, for example, deaths resulting from cervical cancer decreased by nearly 70 percent in the United States from 1955-1992.

Cervical cancer is preventable because of the availability of a vaccine for HPV and effective screening tests, according to an announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month last year. Although highly treatable, the CDC shows that half of all cervical cancer cases occur in women who rarely or never were screened for cancer. In another 10-20 percent of cases, patients were screened but did not receive adequate follow-up care. The CDC has also issued information regarding the availability and importance of preventative HPV vaccines.

The National Cervical Cancer Coalition (NCCC) and the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) also advocate for increased awareness of the disease. In its promotion of the event the NCCC provides numerous suggestions on how to spread the word, including:

  • Enlist radio stations to issue PSAs;
  • Share tweets and Facebook posts to educate their networks;
  • Distribute ASHA/NCCC’s news release to local media, with a guide on how to reach out to media networks; and
  • Write to their mayors or local legislative offices to recognize Cervical Health Awareness Month.

It’s also important for providers to know how to most effectively engage families with girls, according to ASHA/NCCC President and CEO Lynn B. Barclay.

“Only about 35 percent of girls and young women who are eligible for these vaccines have completed the three-dose series,” Barclay says. “Parents are strongly influenced by the recommendations of the family doctor or nurse, so we’ll continue developing cervical cancer information and counseling tools designed specifically for health professionals.“

Now we want to hear from you. How can you increase awareness about cervical cancer in your communities? What can organizations, places of employment and other stakeholders do to help heighten visibility around cervical cancer prevention strategies?

Editorial Note: At press time, information regarding expected estimates of cervical cancer rates in the U.S. for 2014 had not been released. Please note that we will include the latest statistics as soon as data becomes available.

Advocates Unite to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes During National Diabetes Awareness Month

One in three. That’s the number of people in the United States who will have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue. Twenty-six million Americans – seven million of which are undiagnosed – now live with diabetes and another 79 million have pre-diabetes. To raise awareness and spotlight effective prevention strategies, patient advocates are mobilizing to promote National Diabetes Awareness Month and American Diabetes Month® this November.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

As a disease that constitutes one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, diabetes is a disease in which glucose blood levels are elevated above their normal range. Those living with diabetes are also at higher risk of heart disease and stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being 45 years of age or older
  • Being overweight
  • Having a family history of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Engaging in physical activity fewer than three times per week
  • Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy)

Although type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented because people are born with it, individuals can lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through a variety of practical strategies. The CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based program for preventing type 2 diabetes. A public-private partnership of community organizations, private insurers, employers, health care organizations and government agencies, it teaches participants how they can incorporate physical activity into daily life and eat more healthfully, helping them to:

  • Cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half
  • Lose 5-7 percent of body weight through modest changes in behavior
  • Reduce the risk of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes by 5 percent

The program pairs people with a lifestyle coach, in a group setting, to receive 16 core sessions and six post-core sessions over the course of a year. These lifestyle coaches work with the participants to identify emotions and situations that can sabotage their success. The group process encourages participants to share approaches for dealing with challenging situations.

Along with their National Diabetes Prevention program, the CDC also provides a Registry of Recognized Programs that lists contact information for community resources offering type 2 diabetes prevention programs. The registry was created to help health care providers more effectively refer their patients to the services they need, while also empowering patients to find and choose the programs that are right for them. For more information about diabetes and other diseases from CDC, you can sign up for e-mail updates here.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is also committed to raising awareness and providing resources around issues such as diabetes risk, family support, and community support. The goal of their campaign – Control Your Diabetes. For Life is to increase awareness about the benefits of diabetes control through education materials, fact sheets, sample articles and PSAs for radio, print and television. A major part of their focus is also placed upon bringing diabetes information to community settings such as schools, worksites, senior centers and places of worship.

“Although the prevalence of diabetes has continued to rise due to the obesity epidemic, the aging of the U.S. population, and increasing numbers of people at high risk for diabetes, there are strong, encouraging indicators of progress in preventing and treating diabetes,” said Joanne Gallivan, M.S., R.D., Director of NDEP. “Today, there is much greater awareness that diabetes is a serious disease, a critical first step in changing outcomes. In 1997, only 8 percent of Americans believed diabetes was serious. In 2011, 84 percent of Americans understood that it is a serious disease.”

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), which works to “raise awareness of this ever growing disease,” leverages American Diabetes Month® to illustrate how diabetes impacts Americans. By asking people to submit photos that show “A Day in the Life of Diabetes,” the ADA plans to create a large mosaic that demonstrates how diabetes affects patients, families and communities nationwide from personal perspectives.

“Participating in ‘A Day in the Life of Diabetes’ for individuals living with diabetes lets them know that the American Diabetes Association is the one leading organization that continues to do research to ‘STOP Diabetes,’ advocate and promote ‘Healthy Lifestyle Management’ to avoid many of the health issues that people with diabetes die from, such as heart disease or stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and amputations,” said Lurelean B. Gaines, RN, MSN, President of Health Care and Education of the Association. “The campaign has grown this year and will continue to grow because every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes.”

To learn more visit ADA’s website at www.diabetes.org and click on Diabetes Basics, Living With Diabetes, Food Fitness, Advocate, In My Community, or News & Research.  Information is available in English and Spanish. You can also “like” ADA on Facebook, follow them on Twitter (@AMDiabetesAssn) or call them at 1-800-Diabetes.

How can your community more effectively collaborate with stakeholders like ADA, CDC and NDEP to prevent diabetes and help those living with the disease?

August Health Awareness Days Provide Opportunities to Take Action

As young people across the country go back to school, patient advocates and government stakeholders are leveraging awareness days to help communities learn about health issues impacting children, prevention strategies and efforts to improve care. Here are some examples:

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month
Each August organizations including the Envision Foundation underscore the need for screenings and examinations to promote early detection, intervention and prevention of vision problems in children.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Vision disorders in children cost Americans more than $5.7 billion in direct and indirect expenses each year, while the overall cost of vision problems nationwide soars to an estimated $139 billion (includes long-term care, productivity loss and medical bills), according to Prevent Blindness America. Treating eye disorders and vision loss early in life helps protect children from developing chronic, lifelong conditions that become more expensive to treat because of long-term, indirect costs that increase as populations age.

“The beginning of a new school year is an exciting time in a child’s life,” Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a statement.  “By working together with parents and educators, we hope to give all our kids a bright and healthy start!”

National Immunization Awareness Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) highlights the need to improve national immunization coverage levels throughout August. To communicate the importance of immunizations now and throughout the year, NPHIC also developed a toolkit tailored to various populations including babies and pregnant women, pre-teens and teens, young adults, and adults. The toolkit seeks to:

  • Encourage parents of young children to get recommended immunizations by age 2.
  • Help parents ensure older children, preteens and teens have received all recommended vaccines by the time they return to school.
  • Remind college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories.
  • Educate adults, including health care workers, about vaccines and boosters they may need.
  • Urge pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect newborns from diseases like whooping cough.
  • Raise awareness that the next flu season is only a few months away.

The CDC also makes a wide array of resources available for those who want to learn more about the importance of immunizations or spread the word.

Neurosurgery Outreach Awareness Month
The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is among the organizations that underscores why the beginning of the school year is a great time to educate communities about strategies to prevent sports-related head and neck injuries like concussions. AANS provides tools to help others more effectively identify symptoms of potentially serious head/neck injuries and take preventive steps to ensure safety, also offering the following tips:

  • Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials for sports 100 percent of the time.
  • Remain abreast of the latest guidelines and rules governing sports with a high prevalence of head injuries including cheerleading, volleyball, and soccer.

“Concussion awareness, understanding the symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” AANS Public Relations Committee chair Kevin Lillehei, MD, FAANS, said in a statement. “Educating the public is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries. That is why it’s so important to raise awareness in the community and explain just what some of the effects are that these injuries have.”

Psoriasis Awareness Month
Sponsored by The National Psoriasis Foundation each year, Psoriasis Awareness Month is dedicated to “raise awareness, encourage research and advocate for better care for people with psoriasis.”

The most common autoimmune disease in the US affecting 7.5 million Americans, Psoriasis occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth of skin cells and produce red, scaly patches that itch and bleed. About 20,000 children under 10 are also diagnosed, often experiencing symptoms that include pitting and discoloration of the nails, severe scalp scaling, diaper dermatitis or plaques.

As part of Psoriasis Awareness Month, NPF is creating a community of “Pscientists” to “answer real‑world questions about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.”

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month
Although it’s considered a “rare disorder” with approximately 1 in 6000 babies born affected by it, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease that causes voluntary muscles to weaken and in some cases can lead to death, according to the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Types I, II and III belong to a group of hereditary diseases that weaken the voluntary muscles in the arms and legs of infants and children, contributing to breathing issues, difficulty eating and drinking, impaired mobility and orthopedic complications.

Families of SMA, which has coordinated activities around SMA Awareness Month since 1996, and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), are two national organizations that support those living with SMA. Click here to learn about events this month, community networks and research projects for treatment and therapies.

What activities are taking place in your community to support one or more of these awareness days? What could the institutions in your neighborhood, workplace or at your school be doing year-round to more effectively engage populations about critical health issues?

Categories: Access to Care

Implementation of Health Care Law Expanding Coverage to More Young Adults

LJB head shot 03

Linda Barlow

For the first time in nearly a decade, the number of 19-25 year-olds gaining access to health insurance is on the rise, according to the Commonwealth Fund 2012 Biennial Health Insurance Survey. Researchers point to a provision in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA or ACA), which allows young adults to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age 26, as a likely cause of this groundbreaking trend.

“The early provisions of the Affordable Care Act are helping young adults gain coverage and improving the affordability of health care during difficult economic times for American families,” said Sara Collins, Ph.D., a Commonwealth Fund vice president and lead author of the Biennial Survey’s report, Insuring the Future: Current Trends in Health Coverage and the Effects of Implementing the Affordable Care Act.

The improvements in young adult health coverage are significant, according to the Biennial Survey:

  • Nearly eight in 10 (79 percent) of Americans ages 19-25 reported that they were insured at the time of the survey in 2012, up from 69 percent in 2010, or a gain in health insurance coverage for an estimated 3.4 million young adults.
  • The share of young adults in this same age group who were uninsured for any time during the year prior to the survey fell from 48 percent in 2010 to 41 percent in 2012 – an estimated decline of 1.9 million, from 13.6 million uninsured young adults in 2010 to 11.7 million in 2012.

Of the estimated 3.1 million young adults who are now covered through the ACA, 60 percent are leveraging it for mental health, substance abuse, or pregnancy treatment, according to a study from the Employee Benefits Research Institute (EBRI). For one large, national employer profiled in the study, the newly-covered young adults used about $2 million in health care services in 2011 – about 0.2 percent of the employer’s total health spending.

Access is a major barrier to care for young adults, who were previously terminated from their parents’ plans when they turned 19. According to the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), young adults typically face difficulties obtaining their own coverage because they work in entry-level, low-wage or temporary jobs that are less likely to provide health insurance. Lack of insurance makes it harder for young adults to receive adequate medical care –  a problem that plagued one in five young adults before the ACA began to take effect.

“Young adult women have additional health needs and are particularly vulnerable when they are uninsured, as they are at an age when they require reproductive health services,” noted Karyn Schwartz and Tanya Schwartz, authors of KFF’s Issue Paper, How Will Health Reform Impact Young Adults? “Having health insurance and consistent access to the medical system may increase the likelihood that they receive timely pre-natal care if they become pregnant.”

Meanwhile, some skeptics are expressing concerns about key aspects and implications of the Act, from objecting to young single males being required to purchase a plan including maternity benefits and well-baby coverage – to others saying that full implementation of the ACA in 2014 will mean much higher premiums for young adults. Many have challenged these assertions, however, noting that the ACA’s age-based pricing requirements are largely in line with premiums individuals are paying now.

Although the news for young adults is mostly good, the survey also found that 84 million people – nearly half of all working age U.S. adults – went without health insurance in 2012, or faced out-of-pocket costs that were so high relative to their income that they were considered “underinsured.”

The survey did indicate that 87 percent of the 55 million uninsured Americans in 2012 are eligible for subsidized health insurance through the insurance marketplaces or expanded Medicaid under the ACA. Up to 85 percent of the 30 million uninsured adults also might be eligible for either Medicaid or subsidized health insurance plans with reduced out-of-pocket costs.

Click here to learn more about pricing options for young adults seeking health insurance coverage.

Now it’s your turn. Does rollout of the ACA mean more accessible and affordable health insurance coverage, or will it drive up costs, particularly for younger Americans? Get the conversation started.

Categories: Access to Care