Real World Health Care Blog

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Four benefits of electronic health records

Leaders from industry, academia, and health care discuss the rollout of this technology at The Atlantic’s sixth annual Health Care Forum

Today The Atlantic Health Care Forum brought together leading policymakers and industry experts in medicine, public health, and nutrition to have conversations about the state of the nation’s health care system. The event was sponsored by Siemens, Surescripts, WellPoint, GSK and PhRMA. Real World Health Care attended to share insights from the panel “Health Care Tomorrow: Examining the Tools and Technologies that Will Revolutionize the Future Health Care System.”

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Much of the discussion centered around electronic health records, which are increasingly being rolled out in huge hospital systems after the federal government incentivized their adoption to the tune of billions of dollars five years ago. Four themes emerged from the panel, which included top executives from Johns Hopkins Medicine, athenahealth, PhRMA, and Carolinas HealthCare System.

 

1. Enhancing collaboration.

Electronic health records facilitate a team-based approach to hospital care, as well as allowing for better coordination between hospital systems. “What we’re going to see is it’s going to drive team-based clinical care because everyone in the system will have access to the same medical records,” said Dr. Paul Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Vice President for Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University and Chief Executive Officer at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You’re going to see an [increased] level of collaboration not only between delivery systems, but also between the patient and the health care provider.”

However, Ed Park, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, athenahealth, warned that the decades-old technologies that many hospital systems are using are limited in their capabilities. “The current crop of [electronic health records] are documentation tools instead of care management tools,” he said, adding that they are primarily for use by insurers and lawyers. “What I fear is health systems beginning to buy their way into their own prisons that are built of their own IT…as opposed to dealing in an open environment,” he said.

 

2. Enabling patient-centered care.

Electronic health records enable patients to reap greater benefits from telehealth. “Having your information on your iPhone: that’s not far away,” Dr. Rothman said. “[Patients are] going to do EKG’s at home. They’re going to be measuring their blood sugar at home. The patient will have control of the data.”

Electronic records also hold the promise of helping to solve age-old problems in the U.S. health care system, including keeping contact with patients to encourage them to take prescribed treatment regimens. “There is almost $350 billion a year in inefficiency because of lack of compliance and adherence with medications,” said John Castellani, President and Chief Executive Officer, PhRMA. “If you could just get an improvement in whether patients take the medicines that are prescribed, you could capture this great savings.”

“You have kids who have kidney transplants, and you can give them reminders on Facebook that they have to take their medications,” Dr. Rothman added.

 

3. Targeting therapies for increased success.

Electronic medical records can help health care providers ensure that they prescribe the treatments most likely to work for their patients.

“What I think is the promise of electronic medical records is our ability to find subsets of diseases through the broad diseases we treat,” Dr. Rothman said. “Asthma isn’t one disease. Obesity isn’t one disease. Diabetes isn’t one disease. We are going to be able to find subsets of diseases and target therapies [that work]. That’s when you’re going to see efficiency and return on investment.”

 

4. Harnessing the power of big data.

Our health care system has already begun to see the benefits of ‘big data’ with examples such as the discovery of drug side effects and interactions through mining consumer web search data. “We have to use the technologies to bring down the cost of the drug discovery process,” Castellani said.

“Just taking care of the patient, we capture data,” said Dr. Roger Ray, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carolinas HealthCare System. “That allows us to know when a patient…may be at risk for hospital readmission. Having the ability to mine [data]…makes a difference for patients.

“We all, each of us, remember with longing a simpler time when we could scribble and walk off and our job was done,” he added. “What we know now is that’s not very good for the patient. We had no standardization allowing us to help patients avoid lots of different bad outcomes they could have.”

 

Have electronic medical records impacted your health or that of your patients? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Live Updates from 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Programs

Because this blog is all about increasing access, lowering costs, and improving patient outcomes, we think there’s no better place for us to share ideas that work than to report live from the 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Program, in Baltimore, March 5-7.  Check back often as we publish updates from sessions, and follow all of the developments by following #PAP2014.

UPDATE 9:45  Resources for navigators: www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org; patient advocacy groups such as AIDS Institute are publishing helpful sites.  Also marketplace.comment@cms.hhs.gov is a place you can send questions. This is monitored 24/7 with staff – not interns – but people who really know how to help.  These are triaged and go up to leadership when there are problems or trends.

UPDATE 9:40 Lessons learned:

  1. Partner’s are critical to success of ACA implementation; reach out early, often because plan selection often isn’t a one step process.  Patients need to come back many times before ready to sign up.  Very real “huge” health literacy gaps.
  2. Things to come: we are in closing days of enrollment.  March Madness may be a great opportunity for outreach; then we’ll reach out to those most in need; final week will be “here we are.”  So theme weeks continue.   After window closes Mar 31, you’ll soon start seeing promotion of the new window.

UPDATE 9:25 25 states and DC have indicated they will expand Medicaid.  About 85% of Americans already have minimum essential coverage.

UPDATE: 9:15 Health care law saved $8.9 M in drug costs for Medicare, said Janet Miller, Division of Strategic Partners, Office of Communications, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  2014 changes: no discrimination due to pre-existing conditions, annual limits on insurance coverage eliminated, small business tax credit increased; more people are eligible for Medicaid in some states.

Essential benefits include at least 10 general categories such as emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, mental health and substance abuse, lab services, preventive and wellness  services and chronic disease management.

Categories: Access to Care

Companion Diagnostics Target Therapy to the Patients Most Likely to Respond

What cancer patient would want to use trial and error with various chemotherapies when he or she could know first from a diagnostic that one agent in particular would result in the most successful outcome?

David Sheon

David Sheon

A new field has emerged, companion diagnostics, to help predict a patient’s compatibility with chemotherapy or other cancer treatments.  This is a game changer to help ensure drugs are given only to the patients most likely to respond to them. 

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), companion diagnostics already play an important role in determining which therapies are the safest and most effective for a particular patient.  By identifying treatments that work best for specific patients, less money is spent on those that do not work because patients no longer have to endure multiple treatments to find the one that is right for their case. Companion diagnostics, usually created in combination with targeted therapy, not only reduce cost and waste, but also reduce side effects for the patient.

Over the past several years, the FDA has approved the following five companion diagnostics: 

  • Zelboraf and the Cobas Test: The drug Zelboraf specifically treats the melanoma of patients whose tumors express a gene mutation called BRAF V600E. Alberto Gutierrez, Ph.D., Director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said that approval “is a great example of how companion diagnostics can be developed and used to ensure patients are exposed to highly effective, more personalized therapies in a safe manner.”
  • Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit: Developed along with the targeted therapy drug Xalkori for patients with late stage, non-small lung cancer who express the abnormal anaplatic lymphoma kinase gene. The test determines if a patient possesses that gene to ensure that the correct treatment is applied.
  • therascreen KRAS RGQ PCR Kit: For those with colorectal cancer who are determining whether the drug Erbitux is right for them. This provides information about the KRAS gene mutation in patients whose colorectal cancer has spread to other parts of the body. If the test shows that the patient does not have the gene mutation, this demonstrates that Erbitux is the correct choice, but not the right one for those with the gene mutation.
  • EGFR Mutation Test: Administered in conjunction with the targeted therapy drug Tarceva, which detects the epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation in patients with lung cancer. If the patient has the genetic mutation that Tarveca targets, then they are “candidates for receiving Tarceva as first line therapy,” Dr. Gutierrez says. Because this gene is present in approximately 10 percent of patients who have non-small lung cancer, it would go far to help improve the treatment and success rate among these patients.
  • THxID BRAF: Approved alongside two drugs (Tafinlar and Mekinist) – which treat the most dangerous type of skin cancer – this detects the BRAF V600E or V600K gene mutations associated with the disease. If the tumor of the patient contains either of these genes, both drugs are effective. 

Have you – or someone you know – ever been treated with one or more companion diagnostics? What was the experience like and would you recommend it for someone else?

Categories: Cost-Savings