Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: patient assistance

Live Updates from 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Programs

Because this blog is all about increasing access, lowering costs, and improving patient outcomes, we think there’s no better place for us to share ideas that work than to report live from the 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Program, in Baltimore, March 5-7.  Check back often as we publish updates from sessions, and follow all of the developments by following #PAP2014.

UPDATE 9:45  Resources for navigators: www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org; patient advocacy groups such as AIDS Institute are publishing helpful sites.  Also marketplace.comment@cms.hhs.gov is a place you can send questions. This is monitored 24/7 with staff – not interns – but people who really know how to help.  These are triaged and go up to leadership when there are problems or trends.

UPDATE 9:40 Lessons learned:

  1. Partner’s are critical to success of ACA implementation; reach out early, often because plan selection often isn’t a one step process.  Patients need to come back many times before ready to sign up.  Very real “huge” health literacy gaps.
  2. Things to come: we are in closing days of enrollment.  March Madness may be a great opportunity for outreach; then we’ll reach out to those most in need; final week will be “here we are.”  So theme weeks continue.   After window closes Mar 31, you’ll soon start seeing promotion of the new window.

UPDATE 9:25 25 states and DC have indicated they will expand Medicaid.  About 85% of Americans already have minimum essential coverage.

UPDATE: 9:15 Health care law saved $8.9 M in drug costs for Medicare, said Janet Miller, Division of Strategic Partners, Office of Communications, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  2014 changes: no discrimination due to pre-existing conditions, annual limits on insurance coverage eliminated, small business tax credit increased; more people are eligible for Medicaid in some states.

Essential benefits include at least 10 general categories such as emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, mental health and substance abuse, lab services, preventive and wellness  services and chronic disease management.

Categories: Access to Care

Three Ways You Can Reduce the Impact of Cardiovascular Disease this American Heart Month

Most of the readers of this blog know that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer of men and women in this country. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, CVD is a leading cause of disability, preventing Americans from working and enjoying family activities. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests cause the deaths of an estimated 250,000 Americans each year. CVD costs the United States over $300 billion each year.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

There are many small but significant actions we can take. Here is what you can do to make a difference: empower or continue to empower patients to take care of themselves.

1. Address the cost of heart medication

If the cost of your medicine is an issue, talk to your doctor or contact a patient assistance program that may be able to help with prescription co-pays.

2. Encourage healthy behaviors

Want people to eat better? Give them coupons for healthy food. Exercise? Give them coupons for short-term memberships to health clubs.

The stakes are higher in our country’s current health care landscape. With more people on health insurance than ever before, we need to do everything we can to empower people to seek help before an emergency and talk to their doctor about what they can do to take better care of themselves. This will have a direct effect on deaths from heart disease.

3. Ask your employer about Automatic External Defibrillators

There are instances in which individuals are dealt devastating genetic hands of cards. Recently, the Philadelphia Inquirer highlighted the plight of a Philadelphia family that had a genetic link to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle.

For those who do experience heart issues, or even have a major event such as cardiac arrest, Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) devices can significantly increase the likelihood of survival. AEDs have been available for over 20 years, but in recent years, device makers have reduced the size and cost and increased usability of defibrillators, making public access defibrillation viable. “We believe ease of use is one of the most important qualities in an AED because the potential user may not be well-trained in resuscitating a victim of sudden cardiac arrest,” said Bob Peterhans, General Manager for Emergency Care and Resuscitation at Philips Healthcare. “This is consistent with the American Heart Association’s criteria for choosing an AED.”

While risk factors for CVD are often genetic, the majority of CVD is triggered by factors that are controllable: smoking, diet, and exercise. And this is where individual efforts need to be focused.

For more information on preventing CVD, check out the American Heart Association’s guidelines for taking care of your heart, which are broken down by age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also offer an American Heart Month guide to controlling risk factors for cardiovascular disease. You may also want to check out The Heart Truth, a campaign from the National Institutes of Health to make women more aware of the danger of heart disease.

Read more Real World Health Care heart health-related posts:

Are you taking steps to prevent cardiovascular disease? If you, a family member, or a friend has CVD, what is working for treatment? Share your experiences and insights in the comments section.