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Cancer Affects More Than the Body

As the largest professionally led nonprofit network of cancer support worldwide, the Cancer Support Community (CSC), including its Gilda’s Club affiliates, is dedicated to ensuring that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action, and sustained by community.

Hildy Dillon, Vice President, Education and Support Programs, Cancer Support Community

CSC achieves its mission through three areas: direct service delivery, research, and advocacy. The organization includes an international network of nearly 50 local CSCs and Gilda’s Clubs with 120 satellite locations hat offer the highest quality social and emotional support for people impacted by cancer, as well as a community of support available online and over the phone. The Research & Training Institute conducts cutting-edge psychosocial, behavioral and survivorship research.

This article is excerpted from CSC’s Frankly Speaking about Cancer: Treatments & Side Effects, which can be downloaded from CSC’s website.

Talk to Your Doctor

Cancer not only affects your body, but it also has an impact on your thoughts, feelings, beliefs and attitudes. If you or your loved ones have received a cancer diagnosis, know there are actions you and your health care team can take to improve your emotional wellbeing during this experience. Emotional distress is very common. Professional help is advised if depression or anxiety is affecting you; do not be hesitant to obtain expert assistance.

Emotional Distress

Finding out you have cancer can be very challenging. Allow yourself time to adjust to the news. The emotional impact of a cancer diagnosis on an individual or family can vary greatly.

There may be shifts in different aspects of your life, including issues related to self-esteem and body image, family and friendship roles, financial resources and day-to-day activities. Because of these changes, you may experience a wide range of emotions including shock, fear, anger, sadness, thoughts about death, and helplessness.

However, when these feelings interfere with your ability to carry out normal daily functions, you may consider whether you are experiencing depression and/or anxiety. Some people experience depression and anxiety after a diagnosis of cancer, while others may already have a history of depression. Caregivers and family members may also experience depression and/or anxiety.

While it may be difficult, it is important to acknowledge whether you think you might be experiencing symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. If left untreated, depression and anxiety can impact your quality of life. For example, you may decide to skip doctors’ appointments because you feel like you can’t get out of bed or leave the house.

Talk with your health care team if you believe you are experiencing depression and/or anxiety to learn about treatment options. Treating emotional distress is just as important as treating your physical body. Do not neglect this important part of your care.

How Much Emotional Distress is Normal?

Some signs or symptoms that might indicate professional help is required to manage feelings of depression and anxiety are:

  • Sadness or worry so severe that you miss or postpone your treatment appointments
  • Fear that leads to panic or an overwhelming sense of dread
  • An inability to make decisions or difficulty concentrating
  • Extreme irritability or anger
  • Feeling despair or hopelessness
  • Constant thoughts about cancer or death
  • Feeling worthless
  • Lack of interest in activities that previously provided pleasure
  • Sleeping less than 4 hours per night or having difficulty getting out of bed
  • Having no appetite for a period of weeks

Coping Tips

  • Talk to friends, family or spiritual advisors about your feelings and fears.
  • Make an appointment with a counselor, therapist or psychiatrist to help deal with your thoughts and feelings.
  • Join a support group.
  • Ask your doctor about medications that can help.
  • Focus on living in the moment.
  • Use relaxation techniques to reduce stress.
  • Engage in physical activity you enjoy several times a week.

Value of Support

Cancer and its treatment may pose profound challenges to any individual or family. Yet, the idea of knowing you are not alone can be meaningful and significant in learning to cope with a cancer diagnosis. It is helpful to find people with whom you can share and express your feelings.

People cope with their emotions in different ways. Whether it is talking with a family member or friend, through individual therapy, or in the context of a support group, expressing emotions with others can:

  • Decrease anger
  • Improve self-confidence and assertiveness
  • Improve an individual’s expression of support, empathy, interest and humor
  • Improve physical functioning
  • Improve your overall quality of life
  • Decrease feelings of isolation

Cancer Support Helpline

The Cancer Support Helpline is staffed by mental health professionals who have over 170 years of combined experience helping people affected by cancer. They are available to provide emotional support as well as information and referral to local, regional and national resources to anyone impacted by a cancer diagnosis. CSC counselors and resource specialists can be reached by phone or live chat from Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Eastern Time. All of our services are provided to you in English and Spanish.

A Message from Our Sponsor

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), patients with some forms of cancer incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are pleased to announce the introduction of a new Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund will provide financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical counselors, and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about this new Fund and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

How to Get Over It: Fear of Vomiting

This week, Real World Health Care provides information on the fear of vomit by sharing an article originally published by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. We encourage you to visit the ADAA blog to read or take part in the lively commentary discussion that follows the original post for additional insights. 

Editor’s Note: Nausea and vomiting are two common side-effects of chemotherapy. Even if cancer patients don’t experience these side-effects as part of their treatment, the threat looms large, which can have a significant impact on one’s quality of life.

Ken Goodman, LCSW, Clinical Fellow, Anxiety and Depression Association of America

If you have a fear of vomiting, just reading the title of this article might make you a bit queasy. The mere mention of the “V word” might send you into a state of anxiety. If you can relate, I encourage you to press on despite your worry, so you can take the first steps to overcoming it.

Emetophobia?

No one enjoys vomiting and everyone thinks it’s disgusting, but most people are not afraid of it. But if you suffer with this type of phobia (specifically known as emetophobia), you are not only repulsed by the idea of vomiting, you fear it. Many people say that the anticipation of vomiting is often worse than the act itself.

And because you don’t know when it will happen, you are constantly on guard, rearranging your life to ward off any possibility of puking.

What Causes Nausea?

Stomach discomfort and nausea can be caused by motion sickness, a stomach bug, food poisoning, excessive eating or drinking, food intolerance and…anxiety!

That’s right. Anxiety and worry can cause stomach discomfort and nausea. And if you don’t vomit when you’re anxious…you won’t!

Treatment Works

Treating vomit phobia is best accomplished through cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure and response prevention (ERP). Treatment involves correcting faulty beliefs, reducing avoidance, and confronting challenging situations step-by-step. You are given tools, a new perspective, a winning mindset, and a strategy for facing your fears. Your motivation for ending your suffering is important because the therapy does take time, hard work, and courage. You must have self-discipline and determination to win. And if you do…you can beat emetophobia!

Learn more about vomit phobia.

Ken Goodman, LCSW, practices individual and group therapy in Los Angeles to help anxiety and OCD sufferers free themselves from debilitating fear. He is the producer of The Anxiety Solution Series: Your Guide to Overcoming Panic, Worry, Compulsions and Fear, a step-by-step self-help audio program. Visit his website.

Now available – Ken Goodman hosts an ADAA webinar on “Overcoming the Fear of Vomiting.” Watch the video on ADAA’s YouTube channel.

A Message from Our Sponsor:

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), patients with some forms of cancer incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are pleased to announce the introduction of a new Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund will provide financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical counselors, and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about this new Fund and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

Can Psychosocial Care Increase the Value of Cancer Care?

This week, Real World Health Care interviews Suzanne M. Miller, PhD, Professor of Cancer Prevention and Control and Director of Patient Empowerment and Health Decision Making at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC). Dr. Miller , is on the Board of Directors of the HealthWell Foundation and the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM), and serves as Chair of the Board of Directors of the New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute. She also serves as Editor-in-Chief for SBM’s flagship journal Translation Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy and Research.

At FCCC, Dr. Miller’s work focuses on developing, evaluating and implementing psychosocial interventions that can be readily integrated in ongoing cancer care to improve outcomes for patients and their families, especially those outcomes related to patient-centered experiences of their cancer diagnosis. FCCC’s goal is to integrate understanding of the psychological response and negative psychological consequences of a cancer diagnosis with a broader medical management of the patient, and thereby achieve optimal patient-reported outcomes.

We discussed the work of SBM and explored the link between cancer and behavioral health. We also talked about behavioral health screening and the importance of integrated care.

Advocating for Psychosocial Care 

Real World Health Care: How does the Society for Behavioral Medicine address the issue of psychosocial care for cancer patients?

Dr. Suzanne Miller, Fox Chase Cancer Center

Suzanne Miller: SBM advocates for NIH research funding so members and others working in cancer have the dollars they need to discover and scale new behavioral treatments and care approaches. SBM also shares the latest cancer care research with members through our journals and annual scientific conference. This gives them the best information for planning new studies and for helping patients in their clinics.

Our flagship journal, Translational Behavioral Medicine, publishes studies showing how successful behavioral treatments can move from the lab to the clinic where they can help real patients. The journal’s February 2018 issue highlights the use of genomic information in cancer care and in screening cancer patients’ family members.

Other papers published in 2017 feature best practices for encouraging more colon cancer screening and for helping breast cancer patients cope with diagnosis and survival. This recent research by Allicock, et.al. (2017) investigated the drivers of successful implementation of a peer-support program in rural cancer patient populations. It identified possible barriers to the effectiveness of similar community-engaged programs in improving survivorship outcomes.

Several SBM members are at the forefront of successfully training providers to deliver existing empirically supported interventions to patients as well as shifting interventions to user-driven, mobile-friendly, web-based platforms to widen reach in treating anxiety and depressive disorders in cancer patients.

Link Between Cancer and Behavioral Health

RWHC: What are some of the most common behavioral health problems associated with having cancer?

SM: A cancer diagnosis brings a wealth of psychological challenges. In fact, adults living with cancer have a six-time higher risk for psychological disability than those not living with cancer. Patients and families have to deal with not only the physical stress to their lives and potential livelihoods, but also with family dynamics and changes in their sense of self and future.

Cancer patients also must make numerous decisions while they are in an extremely emotional state. They must decide what treatments to pursue, both initially and over the long term, how to cope with treatment side effects, how to deal with disability and maintain an independent identity, and how to maintain quality of life.

Depression and anxiety are common diagnoses associated with these challenges, yet, despite all of this, social or emotional support is offered in less than half of cancer patients’ care. If cancer patients have certain behavioral health conditions and they are not treated for them, it can negatively impact health outcomes by affecting their ability to make sound medical decisions, by decreasing the chances of them seeking and adhering to treatment, and by affecting their immune systems and ability to fight off cancer. Behavioral health issues can also contribute to harmful health behaviors such as smoking. Adults with depression are more likely to smoke heavily and less likely to quit smoking. Smoking is not only linked to cancer incidence but is also associated with a higher burden of side effects reported by cancer patients during treatment and in survivorship.

RWHC: Can behavioral health problems exacerbate physical or biological problems in cancer patients?

SM: Yes, in a number of ways. They interfere with rational decision-making about one’s treatment and one’s life choices. They also undermine adherence to needed regimes, especially over time. For example, after a breast cancer diagnosis, most patients undergo recommended surgery. However, following surgery, many patients are advised to go on hormonal regimes that can be toxic and difficult to endure. Depression and anxiety can undermine adherence to those regimens.

At a physiological level, healing can be delayed or impaired, making patients less likely to reenter society and more likely to experience relapse and recurrences. For example, cellular and molecular processes can be negatively influenced by untreated behavioral disorders in cancer patients, which can lead to the cancer’s progression. Importantly, this connection can also work conversely, meaning psychological treatment has been found to improve underlying biological status. A compelling example of this was shown by Thornton, et.al., (2009) who used a psychological intervention to alleviate symptoms of depression among cancer patients and reduce the presence of inflammatory markers found in the body. This is important because inflammatory markers are an indicator of the stress that is being placed on a person’s immune system. Since mental health issues are also associated with smoking and other unhealthy behaviors, behavioral health problems appear to contribute to worse health outcomes for cancer patients and survivors.

Attention and Support

RWHC: Do you think behavioral health impacts of having cancer get enough attention from the provider community?

SM: The provider community is well aware of and sympathetic to the kinds of challenges patients face. However, they often lack the time and expertise needed to sufficiently screen for depression and anxiety and related psychological issues. This serves as a barrier for provider compliance with recommendations that patients with behavioral health problems receive evidence-based psychological treatment. Further, there is a lack of available costs and infrastructure to pay for appropriate psychosocial interventions. All of this amounts to only 14% of cancer patients receiving behavioral health counseling. Therefore, we are faced with behavioral health issues like depression, which is common in cancer patients and is known to negatively influence cancer outcomes, which are not being addressed sufficiently in the current standard of care.

RWHC: Are there any stigmas attached to this from the patient’s perspective?

SM: Cancer has been the big “C” from the time people became aware of it. More than any other disease, patients fear it and suffer tremendous concerns about the social impact for them and their families when people learn that they have a cancer diagnosis. Further, cancer doesn’t go away. Survivorship and late effects last well after the initial diagnosis, even for early stage cancers. In fact, for a third of cancer patients, distress persists more than a year after their cancer diagnosis and comes in the forms of worrying about the future, feeling lonely or isolated, and financial concerns—to name a few. In addition, there is a very real insurance threat to the individual from having a so-called “pre-existing” condition such as cancer.

RWHC: Who are the best people to advocate for a cancer patient’s behavioral health? What happens when a patient doesn’t have a strong support network?

SM: I believe a well-coordinated health care team, combined with patient and community resources, is the best way to advocate for behavioral health. Each one brings a particular expertise that can speak not only to the public, but also to policy makers. At the patient level, patients need strong support from their families, peers, work, and their health care providers. Among the health care team, mental health providers are especially well-equipped to advocate for patients’ behavioral health needs. At the broader level, the system must consider psychosocial intervention as integral to patient care as a medical intervention. In fact, the two are synergistic, and we must be bold in the serving of the relevance of behavioral health in the overall health of patients diagnosed with cancer.

Behavioral Health Screening

RWHC: What sort of challenges need to be overcome to make a case for the value of psychosocial care for cancer patients?

SM: It is extremely important to show the viability of screening for cancer distress in a cost-effective manner, especially when using information technology (IT) that can help relieve the burden on the health care system. That is exactly why the National Cancer Institute is looking to fund projects that use IT to support the systematic screening and treatment of depression in cancer patients. In addition, it’s very important to show the value of psychosocial care in terms of its impact not only on psychosocial outcomes like depression and anxiety, but also on improving adherence, reducing readmission rates, improving survival rates, and reducing recurrence rates.

Value is defined as health outcomes achieved per dollar spent, so if psychosocial care can improve adherence and survival rates while also decreasing readmission and recurrence, then it can certainly be argued that psychosocial care will increase the value of health care provided.

The Whole Patient

RWHC: How can improving the integration of care and caring for the “whole patient” help to improve behavioral health among cancer patients?

SM: Cancer patients face reality-based anxiety and depression, stigma, changes in self and family identity, and a more frightening and uncertain world. When the health care system limits care to medical interventions, it not only makes the impact of those interventions less effective, but it also fails to recognize the impact of psychosocial influences on cancer prognosis and survivorship.

While some patients may find their way in psychological or social support interventions, if these interventions are not well-integrated within the context of the medical care model, they limit their impact and their validation. This means that patients will be much less likely to have access to, and to uptake, critical psychological resources that can not only improve quality of life, but the quantity of life as well. An integration of care ensures that patients get access to these resources and that no patients are lost to follow-up when it comes to behavioral health care. It provides the patient with a team of support that tackles the physical, social, and emotional challenges that come with a cancer diagnosis.

A Message from Our Sponsor

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), patients with some forms of cancer incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are pleased to announce the introduction of a new Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund will provide financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical counselors, and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about this new Fund and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

 

Behavioral Health: A Costly and Often Untreated Aspect of Chronic Illness

Mental health is the costliest medical condition in the nation, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). It devastates individuals, families and communities. For many, behavioral health problems do not exist in a vacuum; they are inextricably linked with serious medical illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes.

Krista Zodet, President, HealthWell Foundation

According to Mental Health America (MHA), the warning signs of behavioral health issues such as clinical depression are frequently discounted by patients and family members, who mistakenly assume feeling depressed is normal for people struggling with serious health conditions. MHA goes on to note that the symptoms of depression are frequently masked by these other medical illnesses, resulting in treatment that addresses the symptoms, but not the underlying depression.

New Real World Health Care Series

This year, Real World Health Care will bring you a year-long series on behavioral health issues associated with chronic illness. While we will cover a range of chronic illnesses, much of our focus will be on co-occurring disorders with cancer, a pervasive problem according to the statistics:

  • The risk of psychological disability is six times higher for adults living with cancer than those not living with cancer.
  • Adult cancer survivors are more than twice as likely to have disabling psychological problems as adults without cancer.
  • One-third of cancer patients who are more than a year removed from their cancer diagnosis continue to experience distress across a range of issues, including worrying about the future, feeling lonely/isolated, and financial concerns.
  • More than half of cancer patients do not receive social or emotional support as part of their care.
  • Only 14 percent of cancer patients receive behavioral health counseling.

Research finds cancer patients with certain behavioral health conditions, who are untreated, may not make sound medical decisions, may avoid helpful treatments, or may not adhere to medication or other therapies, notably worsening health outcomes. In addition, if left untreated, behavioral health disorders among cancer patients have been shown to negatively influence the underlying cellular and molecular processes that facilitate the progression of cancer.

These are some of the reasons why experts in the cancer field and other chronic disease areas are calling for integrated behavioral health services that will contribute to better patient care and reduce system-wide costs.

Subscribe Today

We encourage you to subscribe to this Real World Health Care series on Behavioral Health by entering your email address in the sign-up box on the right-hand side of this page. You’ll be treated to insights on programs and initiatives from individuals and organizations dedicated to making sure that those with chronic illnesses like cancer are also getting the behavioral health treatments they need.

Helping Cancer Patients Get the Behavioral Health Treatments They Need

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), they incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are pleased to announce the introduction of a new Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund will provide financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about this new Fund, and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

Should clinicians replace medication with an ancient spiritual practice?

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University sifted through over 18,000 studies on a potential treatment for pain, anxiety and depression, narrowing their meta-analysis to 47 scientifically rigorous clinical trials. The results, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, revealed what many have experienced over thousands of years: while it’s not a cure-all, this treatment can help alleviate pain, anxiety and depression. The treatment? Meditation.

David Sheon

David Sheon

Meditation began as an ancient spiritual practice but is now also utilized outside of traditional settings to promote health and well-being. The study findings incorporate the effects of mindfulness meditation on over 3,500 participants who were selected to take part in either a meditation regimen or a different therapy, such as exercise. Overall, researchers found that the effect of meditation on participants was moderate and on par with that of prescription medications.

While this is a promising result on the benefits of meditation, the researchers identified a number of limitations. The study did not find any evidence of meditation affecting other health concerns such as positive mood, attention, substance use, eating habits, sleep and weight. Also, meditation did not provide any long-term therapy as compared to medication. “The benefits did attenuate over time — with the effectiveness of meditation decreasing by half, three to six months after the training classes ended,” said study leader Dr. Madhav Goyal, an assistant professor of medicine at Hopkins. “We don’t know why this occurred, but it could have been that they were practicing meditation less often.”

Still, Dr. Goyal said he is encouraged by the study’s results, specifically because of the short training periods for the participants. There may be greater potential for individuals with more instruction or experience in meditation. “Compared to other skills that we train in, the amount of training received by the participants in the trials was relatively brief,” he said. “Yet, we are seeing a small but consistent benefit for symptoms of anxiety, depression and pain. So you wonder whether we might see larger effects with more training, practice and skill.”

While the new study suggests that in some cases, meditation may be used in addition to or in lieu of prescription drugs to treat pain, anxiety and depression, it is important for patients to consult their doctors before altering any course of treatment.

At RealWorldHealthCare.org, we have been interested in meditation’s potentially positive impact on health. Last April, we posted about a recent study in which meditation halved the risk of death, heart attack and stroke in African American men.

Meditation may have economic benefits as well. According to a July 2013 Huffington Post blog, Aetna’s employee health care costs went down by 7 percent in 2012 after the company implemented a wellness program, which CEO Mark Bertolini attributes to reducing stress through meditation and yoga. In recognition of its positive health impact, some insurance companies provide benefits for meditation instruction. For example, CareFirst’s Options Discount Program offers up to 30% off fees for participating meditation instructors. In 2010, Americans spent more than $11 billion on antidepressants, according to the American Psychological Association.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the NIH offers an introduction to meditation, its uses and guidance for those who wish to practice meditating. The National Meditation Specialist Certification Board, an organization that seeks to promote meditation as a specialized field in health care, keeps a directory of meditation specialists, and there are many other such directories available online or through participating insurance providers.

In a Psychology Today article guiding those interested in mindfulness meditation, Dr. Karen Kissel Wegela emphasizes that sick or healthy, meditation can help people cope. “The sitting practice of mindfulness meditation gives us exactly this opportunity to become more present with ourselves just as we are,” she says. “This, in turn, shows us glimpses of our inherent wisdom and teaches us how to stop perpetuating the unnecessary suffering that results from trying to escape the discomfort, and even pain, we inevitably experience as a consequence of simply being alive.”

Have you ever meditated? Have you or someone you know ever meditated to treat depression, pain or anxiety? Did you find it effective?

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