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Tag Archives: medication

This Holiday Season, Give Emergency Relief to Cancer Patients

ECRF_Facebook_wig_boost“You have cancer.”

Those devastating words send chills through us all. As the initial shock subsides the reality of unanticipated expense deals a second, unwelcome blow.

We know from assisting more than 70,000 cancer patients with the cost of their treatments just how financially overwhelming and destructive a cancer diagnosis can be. Cancer Doesn’t Care that a patient can’t afford their pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center.  Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care, but we do.

That’s why during this season of giving, we are proud to announce the launch of our “Cancer Doesn’t Care” giving campaign to raise the remaining funds needed to launch the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). The ECRF will allow us to provide immediate grants to qualified cancer patients to assist them with meaningful comforts, such as anti-nausea medicine, travel to and from an appointment, wigs and other hidden expenses.  Giving is as easy as clicking here.

The out-of-pocket critical costs of cancer can be financially devastating. According to a Duke University Medical Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute study, out-of-pocket, cancer-related costs averaged $712 a month. Further, the study found that about 30 percent of respondents said their expenses were a “significant burden” and 11 percent called those expenses a “catastrophic problem.”

The “Cancer Doesn’t Care” campaign asks individuals, celebrities, and corporations for financial and social media support. We’ve created powerful social media graphics and messaging that can be shared to highlight the many ways that cancer affects patients financially.

Cancer patients must pay for so much more than treatment, and every little bit makes a difference. Please help make the holidays a little brighter by donating, and reach out to friends and family through your own social media networks. Share the messages we’ve prepared or create your own.  Even a small donation can make a difference.

Please help ease the burden for someone who has received these three devastating words by asking your social networks to give. On behalf of HealthWell and the thousands of cancer patients we serve, I thank you for caring.

***

The HealthWell Foundation is an independent non-profit that provides financial assistance to underinsured Americans to help them afford life-changing medical treatments (and sponsor of this blog).

 

If Uber can Deliver Flu Shots, Could Drones Deliver Medications?

Vanessa Merta

Vanessa Merta

Last Thursday, Uber test ran a new concept that added wellness to its mission of evolving the way the world moves. Along with making cities more accessible, Uber made health care more accessible with flu shot deliveries. Currently, we know of no other companies delivering vaccines upon request like Uber, but we do know of a few other health care delivery services in the works, and some of the more exciting services include drones.

DHL has been researching delivery of health care with drones they’re calling “parcelcopters.” While Amazon Prime Air has been working on delivering products via drone, DHL is testing the system with medications specifically. As a part of a month long test run that began in September, they have been delivering medications via unmanned aircraft from a coastal town in Germany to the small island of Juist, about seven and a half miles away. The only restriction thus far has been the inability to send medications that need to be refrigerated. DHL is still early in the product testing process, but they are hopeful that this can be a way to deliver medications to those who live in rural areas, or are unable to get to pharmacies.

While delivering mediations via drone sounds like an optimal solution that could provide quick health care to people in hard to reach places, some ethical questions arise. Could personal identifying information be at risk if these parcelcopters crash? A DHL spokeswoman says that the drones will not fly in the same altitudes as conventional aircrafts, and also avoid this possible breach of privacy by avoiding flying over homes.

Time magazine quickly refuted another common fear that drone delivery will increase air pollution, claiming that it can be greener than traditional forms of pick up and deliveries.

Time reporter Bryan Walsh says that delivery services are “a lot more efficient at delivering products to you than you are at driving out and buying them yourself,” and drones are no exception.

Following in Amazon Prime Air’s path, FedEx has been researching drone delivery, but they want to find a specific niche. They have not named their interests yet, but why not consider medication delivery? Over the summer, Google announced that they have been researching drone delivery in the Australian outback, where they successfully delivered first aid kits to rural farmers. Both companies are in the developing stage, but once finished this could be a promising new technology that improves health care accessibility.

American companies will have a more difficult time than DHL in Germany because the Federal Aviation Administration bans the use of unmanned aircrafts to deliver commercial products. Amazon says that as soon as the FAA has the proper regulations in place, it will begin delivering products via drone. Maybe after that, an American drone delivery service will claim medication delivery as their niche.

How would you feel about drones delivering your medications? Do you think these nontraditional methods of health care delivery will gain acceptance and popularity in the future? Tell us what you think in the comments section!

Categories: Access to Care

Patient of the Month: Charles Fazio’s recovery from heart bypass surgery, kidney failure, and financial crisis

Patient of the Month is a new regular feature from Real World Health Care to illustrate the challenges and successes of the American health care system through the experiences of inspiring survivors.

Charles Fazio wasn’t sure how he could survive another health crisis.

Charles Fazio

Charles Fazio

Just three years after his four-way heart bypass surgery, he developed end stage kidney failure. In the worsening economy, he had lost his job as a traffic signal technician in Norfolk, Virginia and had since become too sick to work. On top of his serious health problems, Charles’ financial worries were overwhelming.

“It was like after having all of these other things happen, now I have to deal with this, too,” said Charles. “It was a big shock.”

Charles’ disability benefits had not begun to come in and he had to sell off his possessions to afford his medical expenses. Eventually, he lost his home and found himself homeless for several days.

“One night I stayed in my mom’s nursing home. I went in to visit her and I pretended like I just fell asleep in the chair next to her,” Charles said.

In short, it had been a rough few years, to say the least.

Charles was treated at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital and received dialysis for a year and a half at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Medical Center. Completing the process for Medicare allowed him to afford his dialysis treatments and living expenses.

Then, one day in 2012, Charles’ regular doctor appointment morphed into an overnight kidney transplant. “I was scared to death,” Charles said. “I didn’t know what to expect. I had read up on everything thoroughly, but when the time comes, you really just have to face it.”

By 4 o’clock the next day, he had a transplant kidney.

Charles continued treatment and testing at the VCU Medical Center after his operation. His recovery went smoothly, but he still required numerous medications and immunosuppressants. Again, he couldn’t afford the copays.

That’s when doctors and social workers introduced Charles to the HealthWell Foundation, a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog).. Charles was given a grant that enabled him to afford his medications.

“The grant I got from [HealthWell] took a lot of worry off of my back, a lot of tension,” Charles said.

With his financial stress reduced, Charles was better able to emotionally cope with his condition. “The help I got from Norfolk General, the VCU and [HealthWell] was the turning point for all of my frustrations, for feeling sorry for myself,” he said.

Now, Charles is doing quite well. At a recent annual check-up with his doctors at the VCU, his blood tests came back looking good. His transplant kidney is holding up well and his medication is stable. “You never know how you’re doing, even though you’re dieting and doing what your doctors are telling you,” he said. “In the back of your mind you’re asking, ‘How am I doing?’ and only a doctor can tell you.”

“But they said I’m doing well, and I feel good too.”

Charles is optimistic that his series of unfortunate events may now be in the past. He is recovering well and doing his best to stay healthy in his eating habits and his lifestyle. “When the weather’s nice, I try to take a walk once a week, and I hold on,” he said.

One step at a time, Charles. We’re all glad you’re here.

Categories: Access to Care, General

Four benefits of electronic health records

Leaders from industry, academia, and health care discuss the rollout of this technology at The Atlantic’s sixth annual Health Care Forum

Today The Atlantic Health Care Forum brought together leading policymakers and industry experts in medicine, public health, and nutrition to have conversations about the state of the nation’s health care system. The event was sponsored by Siemens, Surescripts, WellPoint, GSK and PhRMA. Real World Health Care attended to share insights from the panel “Health Care Tomorrow: Examining the Tools and Technologies that Will Revolutionize the Future Health Care System.”

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Much of the discussion centered around electronic health records, which are increasingly being rolled out in huge hospital systems after the federal government incentivized their adoption to the tune of billions of dollars five years ago. Four themes emerged from the panel, which included top executives from Johns Hopkins Medicine, athenahealth, PhRMA, and Carolinas HealthCare System.

 

1. Enhancing collaboration.

Electronic health records facilitate a team-based approach to hospital care, as well as allowing for better coordination between hospital systems. “What we’re going to see is it’s going to drive team-based clinical care because everyone in the system will have access to the same medical records,” said Dr. Paul Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Vice President for Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University and Chief Executive Officer at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You’re going to see an [increased] level of collaboration not only between delivery systems, but also between the patient and the health care provider.”

However, Ed Park, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, athenahealth, warned that the decades-old technologies that many hospital systems are using are limited in their capabilities. “The current crop of [electronic health records] are documentation tools instead of care management tools,” he said, adding that they are primarily for use by insurers and lawyers. “What I fear is health systems beginning to buy their way into their own prisons that are built of their own IT…as opposed to dealing in an open environment,” he said.

 

2. Enabling patient-centered care.

Electronic health records enable patients to reap greater benefits from telehealth. “Having your information on your iPhone: that’s not far away,” Dr. Rothman said. “[Patients are] going to do EKG’s at home. They’re going to be measuring their blood sugar at home. The patient will have control of the data.”

Electronic records also hold the promise of helping to solve age-old problems in the U.S. health care system, including keeping contact with patients to encourage them to take prescribed treatment regimens. “There is almost $350 billion a year in inefficiency because of lack of compliance and adherence with medications,” said John Castellani, President and Chief Executive Officer, PhRMA. “If you could just get an improvement in whether patients take the medicines that are prescribed, you could capture this great savings.”

“You have kids who have kidney transplants, and you can give them reminders on Facebook that they have to take their medications,” Dr. Rothman added.

 

3. Targeting therapies for increased success.

Electronic medical records can help health care providers ensure that they prescribe the treatments most likely to work for their patients.

“What I think is the promise of electronic medical records is our ability to find subsets of diseases through the broad diseases we treat,” Dr. Rothman said. “Asthma isn’t one disease. Obesity isn’t one disease. Diabetes isn’t one disease. We are going to be able to find subsets of diseases and target therapies [that work]. That’s when you’re going to see efficiency and return on investment.”

 

4. Harnessing the power of big data.

Our health care system has already begun to see the benefits of ‘big data’ with examples such as the discovery of drug side effects and interactions through mining consumer web search data. “We have to use the technologies to bring down the cost of the drug discovery process,” Castellani said.

“Just taking care of the patient, we capture data,” said Dr. Roger Ray, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carolinas HealthCare System. “That allows us to know when a patient…may be at risk for hospital readmission. Having the ability to mine [data]…makes a difference for patients.

“We all, each of us, remember with longing a simpler time when we could scribble and walk off and our job was done,” he added. “What we know now is that’s not very good for the patient. We had no standardization allowing us to help patients avoid lots of different bad outcomes they could have.”

 

Have electronic medical records impacted your health or that of your patients? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Five Ways to Manage the Costs of Your Medicine

While a main precept of the Affordable Care Act is to expand access to health care, in some cases that improved access means more patients are being treated with medications that come with a cost. As a pharmacist, I have to be an insurance sleuth, use common sense, and teach my patients the old-fashioned methods of negotiation.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

I work in solid organ transplant, HIV, and Hepatitis C medicine. I have patients on regimes ranging from 4 to over 20 medications. For my patients, obtaining consistent, reasonably-priced medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – is vital.

1. Make sure all the medications are at one pharmacy.  It’s important to keep a clinical eye on things for drug interactions. As a bonus, the pharmacist and the patient know what costs need to be examined.

2. Seek out insurance prior authorization.  Some insurance companies require prior authorization to cover certain drugs. Your pharmacist can help you seek prior authorization for medications that require it using software that creates forms specific to each insurance company. Ask if your pharmacist can fill out the form as much as possible before sending it to your doctor.

3. Contact the drug company.  Many pharmaceutical companies offer patient assistance programs or co-pay assistance cards to help eligible patients obtain free medicines, particularly for biologics and expensive drugs. These programs are especially helpful for patients who have insurance gaps and need the medications quickly. Depending on the assistance from a case manager or care coordinator, I have received authorization for medications right away or within 72 hours.

4. Search for a co-pay assistance program that covers your condition.  If your drug company does not offer a patient assistance program or you are not eligible based on your income and insurance coverage, it is possible that a charitable patient assistance program through a non-profit organization such as the HealthWell Foundation may be able to help you.

5. Seek discounts for over-the-counter medications.  Over-the-counter medications can put a strain on the wallet. In many cases, purchasing over-the-counter medications is more expensive than prescription medications covered by insurance. Other items like vitamins, natural supplements, and enteral formulas (also known as ‘milks’) require the patient to do a little negotiating. If you tell the pharmacy or vitamin store you will be taking these items indefinitely, they may be inclined to discount. Also, be on the lookout for buy one get one deals (BOGOs). Finally, enteral formulas can be quite expensive, so if you get prescribed a specially formulated one, ask if you can take a more basic formulation instead. Remember to let your prescriber and pharmacist know which over-the-counter medications and supplements you are using.

In conclusion, while the path to affordable medications is not always easy, there are individuals, programs, and strategies that can help you meet your health care goals.

How do you manage your medications? Share your tips in the comments section.

Categories: General

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

If you would like to suggest a topic, contribute a guest post, or learn more about short-term co-sponsorship opportunities, please contact us at dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com. As a blog currently sponsored solely by the HealthWell Foundation, an independent non-profit providing nationwide financial assistance to insured Americans with high out-of-pocket medication expenses, co-sponsorship helps us keep Real World Health Care alive and well as a resource for journalists, health care professionals, policymakers, and patients. Plus, co-sponsorship will increase your organization’s visibility among thought leaders in the health care sphere.

Do you have a favorite Real World Health Care post? Is there something you’d like to see more of? Post to the comments section or tweet at us at @RWHCblog.

What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Editor’s Note: This MS Awareness Week, we are pleased to feature a guest post by Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business. Mr. Cavuto is an inspiration to many people living with multiple sclerosis, and he shares his perspectives on triumphing over the disease.

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Perhaps the most maddening thing about having MS when you’re a TV anchor is that some days it hits you when you’re on TV and you’re “trying to anchor.” You’re trying to be on top of your game, but your body is playing games with you. That’s when “anchor” takes on a whole new meaning…not what I am on television, but the dead weight I’ve become in reality.

It’s at those times when I can’t move, that I often feel moved to explain to viewers, “it’s not me, it’s the MS.” It’s not me forgetting that guest’s name, it’s an exacerbation hitting my brain and causing me to forget that guest’s name. It’s at those times I lose my train of thought, that I question how thoughtless MS is. That’s when this illness hits home – when I just want to hit back, but can’t. This MS Awareness Week, it’s about reminding folks what it feels like to be…weak…to be vulnerable, to simply be unable to do the simplest things.

I can’t tell you the number of people who stop me and ask how I get through such moments. Fortunately, they’re moments, I answer. But sadly, sometimes very long moments. The one remarkable aspect of MS is how it quickly schools its victims to adapt…or perish. We either have to adjust to its wild, sometimes vicious swings, or face a life constantly succumbing to each and every progressive or remittent reminder.

That’s easier said than done, of course, but after more than 15 years of dealing with this, for me, it’s come to this: mind over matter. No matter what’s going on with your body, tell your brain it doesn’t matter. For me, the regimen for dealing with MS has been pretty much the same – once-a-week self-injections of Avonex, Biogen’s great elixir for slowing the progressive attacks, or at least, limiting their severity – over time.

But that doesn’t mean things don’t come up, and problems and complications still develop. For me, they’ve been everything from days-long blind spots that require me to “wing” my news copy on air…to allowing more time to make it to the news set, because I simply cannot walk.  I long ago concluded I cannot control these attacks – neither their frequency nor severity. But I “can” control how I react to them. That’s why I always try adapting and reasoning in my head that if the left eye goes out, coordinate better use of the right eye. The left arm weakens, get fairly competent enough with the right arm. These adjustments aren’t easy or fast but they certainly are now routine. That’s good for me, but it was hit and miss for years, perfecting this behavior for me.

I’m better at it now, but my nickel-and-dime advice for MS sufferers everywhere is, it’s a day at a time now…always. Part of doing what I do is understanding how I can keep making my body do it, even when it’s not cooperating. I mentioned how I often memorize copy and whole segments of my show in my head, for those moments I lose my vision. But there’s much more to it than that. After all, that’s fairly easy when I’m the one writing my shows…I kind of remember what I said. But it’s also about maintaining my physical energy, and that means denying the very progression of the disease itself.

Each and every morning, no matter what, I exercise my legs – certainly no Olympian workout – but on a treadmill or stationary bike, doing what I can to keep these legs going, even when they’re not cooperating. I’m forever panicked that someday they’ll simply fail, and then I’ll be a cripple. I fear that day is coming. Some neurologists warn me that given the progressive nature of my MS, it “will” be coming. But I fight like hell to push that day off. If I can pass along any advice at all, it is simply that – to simply never accept a prognosis as is. Fight it. Challenge it. “Will” yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.

One of the things I’ve discovered about people dealing with illnesses is that sometimes they think they’re the only ones dealing with pain. There’s a natural self-absorption to that and to them, and when you throw in a guy who wears makeup and counts on viewers liking him, there’s a damn-near “fixation” to it. That’s not to say MS patients shouldn’t ask for support and understanding, they just shouldn’t demand it. As I’ve said many, many times, on the air and off, it’s not your spouse’s fault you have MS, or your kids’ fault, or your boss’s fault, or your colleagues’ fault. We may be surprised the world isn’t always understanding or caring or nurturing. But I’ve discovered all of us in life, bear some cross in life. Some are obvious. Some aren’t. But all do, if not at the time we literally first bump or trip into them…eventually.

I’ve become very philosophical with this disease, and concluded (heresy for a media personality) that it’s not always about me. It’s not always about us. It’s not always about our pain, or exacerbation, or what we’re forgetting, or what muscles are failing. I try to tell my kids we are the sum of our challenges, not necessarily the sum of our successes. I believe we are defined in life, not by the things that go well in our lives, but precisely by how we handle the things that do not.

I want that to be our greatest awareness this week – that we are not weak, that we are not victims, that we are not handicapped. We are challenged, yes. But we are up to the challenge. It might sound crazy to say that I’m grateful for MS, and grateful as well for having had cancer…but I am, and here’s why. It’s made me a better person, a better father, and a better husband. Now, I don’t know if viewers hearing my constantly compromised scratchy voice agree it’s made me a better anchor on TV. But “I” know it’s made me a more complete soul…just appreciating the fragility of life. That’s why I never take it for granted and have a healthy respect for just appreciating your health…compromised as it is. Because it sure beats…the alternative.

Make this a meaningful MS Awareness Week by promising never to stop seeing the strength that comes from being…weak.

Categories: General

Make Life a Little Easier for Sick Children This #GivingTuesday

Cyndi from Midland, TX didn’t know how she was going to pay for the asthma medication her son Ethan desperately needed. Feeling like nothing was going right and not knowing where to turn, she was on the verge of losing hope. Then something dramatic happened that would change everything. Cyndi discovered the HealthWell Foundation:

Cyndi didn't know how she was going to pay for her son Ethan's (right) asthma medication until she found the HealthWell Foundation.

Cyndi didn’t know how she was going to afford asthma medication for her son Ethan (right) until she applied to the HealthWell Foundation for financial assistance.

Our son was born very sick. He spent 5 weeks in the NICU, 2 of which were on a ventilator. When we finally brought him home, we knew I had to stay home with him. If we put him in daycare, we knew he would get sick and that would be hard on his lungs. With me not working, it put a huge cloud over our finances. We quickly found out that his asthma medication was not cheap, even with insurance. I also found out that there isn’t a lot of help for people who have insurance and a decent job. I spent hours and hours on the Internet and the phone trying to find some help. One day I found HealthWell. We applied thinking we would be denied. The day I got the acceptance letter in the mail, I sat on the kitchen floor and cried. I felt a sense of relief. Finally, something was going right. We cannot be more grateful for all the help HealthWell has given us. 

When you give to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund for #GivingTuesday, you will make a difference for children who have been diagnosed with a chronic or life-altering condition, just in time for the holidays. Every penny of your donation will help us provide financial assistance to patients so they can afford the rising cost of care:

  • To date, HealthWell has awarded more than 274,000 grants to insured adults and children across all of our funds to help them afford treatments.
  • In just two months, we awarded grants of up to $5,000 to more than 20 families.

No family should ever have to wonder whether they can afford to save their child’s life. By giving to the Pediatric Assistance Fund, you will help us remain a lifeline for families so they can afford life-saving treatment for their sick children.

Your gift will help ensure that families with children who have chronic conditions – including leukemia, cystic fibrosis, or juvenile diabetes – are not forced to choose between paying the bills and affording quality care. Here’s a breakdown of how donations, large and small, will have a tangible impact:

  • $10 covers the cost of diabetes test strips for Michael for one month.
  • $45 supports Yessenia’s pituitary hormone treatment for 1 week.
  • $75 covers Quinnlian’s lesion treatment for immunosuppressive disease for one month.

Start the holidays off right by donating to HealthWell for #GivingTuesday and make life a little easier for more families like Ethan’s. Your gift will make the season brighter for children and families struggling to afford the medications or treatments they need.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Give Patients the Gift of Hope and Health by Supporting HealthWell for #GivingTuesday

We are proud to announce that the HealthWell Foundation – an independent 501(c)(3) charity that provides financial assistance to insured patients living with chronic and life-altering illnesses – is joining the #GivingTuesday campaign, which launches today. 100 percent of your donation to HealthWell goes directly to grants and services that will benefit patients in need across the country. This week we are sharing some powerful real-world examples of how your gift to HealthWell will help transform lives.

Lynn Harcharik

Lynn, who received financial assistance from HealthWell for cancer treatments.

As one of our country’s most trusted independent charities, we believe that no patient, including those living with cancer, should go without health care because they can’t afford it. By donating to HealthWell for #GivingTuesday, you’ll join us in making that commitment a reality that will change lives for the better, one patient at a time – just like Lynn.

It was ovarian cancer spreading to the colon. My husband called many places, no cancer society would help! One society asked what type of cancer it was, and replied: there are no funds for ovarian cancer – we cannot help. Another organization had already used their funds. It was very discouraging, but my oncologist’s secretary told us about the HealthWell Foundation. After calling and talking to your group, the answer was YES, you would help. (Thanks!) In October of 2008, reversal surgery was done with the ileostomy. And yes, the cancer came back, or maybe was not completely gone from before, but-more chemo! Thank you for being there in my time of need. My prayers are with your group and your work. Thanks!

– Lynn (Streator, IL)

We want to make a difference for even more patients like Lynn so they can access critical medical treatments and get better. But that can only happen with your support.

That’s why, for this year’s #GivingTuesday, we’re urging Real World Health Care (RWHC) Blog readers to donate to the HealthWell Foundation’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). Your generous holiday gift will help ensure that patients living with cancer are not forced to choose between paying the rent or buying food and affording life-saving care.

So what, specifically, will your tax-deductible #GivingTuesday donation do? Giving to ECRF will bring us closer to meeting our $100,000 goal by the end of the year so the fund can open in January. We are almost halfway there with more than $46,000 raised so far. Every dollar counts, and with just a little more help, we will hit our goal so that more cancer patients can start 2014 off right.

To help more families and patients afford the urgent medical treatments they desperately need, we need you to support #GivingTuesday starting today. Please contribute as generously as you possibly can.

Thank you for giving the gift of health this holiday season.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Kaiser Permanente Gives Providers Evidence-Based Tools to Increase Adherence

At an industry conference years ago, I met an HIV-positive patient. We spoke about her treatment as well as her adherence program. “Who takes care of you?” I asked. “Kaiser Permanente,” she responded. Afterward, I did a little research and discovered this was one of the first HMOs created in the United States that takes care of millions of patients. Based in Oakland, California, their goal is “supporting preventative medicine and attempting to educate its members about maintaining their own health.”

Joel L. Zive

Joel L. Zive

Adherence remains a capstone in caring for patients after medications are dispensed and is an especially important issue for indigent populations. But now with implementation of health care reform fast approaching, patients will be required to take even more responsibility for their health, including adherence to medication regimens. Although no integrated health care structure is perfect, Kaiser’s integrative model fascinates me and allows its health care teams to implement successful adherence strategies.

For example, a Kaiser physician at the South San Francisco Medical Center conducted a hypertension study (“Improved Blood Pressure Control Associated With a Large-Scale Hypertension Program”) that compared their program’s results to those at the state and national level. The outcomes are startling:

  • The Kaiser Hypertension control rate nearly doubled, skyrocketing from 43.6 percent in 2001 to 80.4 percent in 2009.  
  • In contrast, the national mean of hypertensive control went from 55.4 to only 64.1 percent during the same time period.

One aspect of this program included using single pill combination therapy, which has been shown to boost adherence. In a slightly different approach to adherence in hypertension, Kaiser Permanente Northern California and UC San Francisco were recently awarded an $11 million grant to fund a stroke prevention program by targeting and treating hypertension among African Americans and young adults.

By Googling “Kaiser Permanente adherence” the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research appears. Their published research draws from Kaiser Permanente units throughout their network, collaborations with academic institutions nationwide, and the HMO Research Network – a consortium of 18 health care delivery organizations with both defined patient populations and formal, recognized research capabilities. These resources provide clinicians and pharmacists with a plethora of study designs and disease states from which to choose and evaluate.

In the study “Determination of optimized multidisciplinary care team for maximal antiretroviral therapy adherence,” for example, a multidisciplinary care team was assigned to patients with new antiretroviral drug regimens. Because this model translated to improved adherence rates, clinical teams around the country now use some variation of a multidisciplinary approach, enabling each discipline’s area of expertise to benefit the patient.

Another article from Kaiser — “Health Literacy and Antidepressant Medication Adherence Among Adults with Diabetes: The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)” – demonstrates that adherence is multifactorial.  This study’s conclusions underscore the importance of health care literacy components, simplifying health communications for treatment options, executing an enhanced public relations campaign around depression and monitoring refill rates.

In my experience, if someone with mental health issues does not take his or her medications, then regardless of disease state, the patient’s treatment falls off the track. I approach these difficult situations by drawing on the conclusions of the above studies:

  • First, is there a different message I could give the patient? Or am I reaching the patient at a level of health care literacy he could understand? For example, I had a deaf patient who found it tiresome writing messages back and forth to me. When I realized he “speaks” to people via a teletype machine, I began communicating with him via word processing software. This made our communications less cumbersome. And this improved adherence to his regime because he was less frustrated.
  • Next, the multidisciplinary approach is quite powerful. When I served HIV-positive patients in the South Bronx, if anything occurred that affected adherence, the prescriber, nurse, social worker or case manager immediately were made aware. Sometimes we would discontinue the regimen and other times we would tweak the regimen and get the patient back on treatment.

The real adherence tragedy for indigent patients is not whether they receive medication, but whether they have access to the tools, education and knowledge they need to take their meds as prescribed. Leveraging articles from resources like Kaiser’s Division of Research may be the solution to reversing the trend of low adherence.

Now we want to hear from you. If you’re a patient, has your doctor or pharmacist worked with you to improve med adherence? If you’re a provider, what resources have you found to be useful when helping patients understand why they should take meds as prescribed? Share your stories in the comments.

Categories: Access to Care