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Four benefits of electronic health records

Leaders from industry, academia, and health care discuss the rollout of this technology at The Atlantic’s sixth annual Health Care Forum

Today The Atlantic Health Care Forum brought together leading policymakers and industry experts in medicine, public health, and nutrition to have conversations about the state of the nation’s health care system. The event was sponsored by Siemens, Surescripts, WellPoint, GSK and PhRMA. Real World Health Care attended to share insights from the panel “Health Care Tomorrow: Examining the Tools and Technologies that Will Revolutionize the Future Health Care System.”

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Much of the discussion centered around electronic health records, which are increasingly being rolled out in huge hospital systems after the federal government incentivized their adoption to the tune of billions of dollars five years ago. Four themes emerged from the panel, which included top executives from Johns Hopkins Medicine, athenahealth, PhRMA, and Carolinas HealthCare System.

 

1. Enhancing collaboration.

Electronic health records facilitate a team-based approach to hospital care, as well as allowing for better coordination between hospital systems. “What we’re going to see is it’s going to drive team-based clinical care because everyone in the system will have access to the same medical records,” said Dr. Paul Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Vice President for Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University and Chief Executive Officer at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You’re going to see an [increased] level of collaboration not only between delivery systems, but also between the patient and the health care provider.”

However, Ed Park, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, athenahealth, warned that the decades-old technologies that many hospital systems are using are limited in their capabilities. “The current crop of [electronic health records] are documentation tools instead of care management tools,” he said, adding that they are primarily for use by insurers and lawyers. “What I fear is health systems beginning to buy their way into their own prisons that are built of their own IT…as opposed to dealing in an open environment,” he said.

 

2. Enabling patient-centered care.

Electronic health records enable patients to reap greater benefits from telehealth. “Having your information on your iPhone: that’s not far away,” Dr. Rothman said. “[Patients are] going to do EKG’s at home. They’re going to be measuring their blood sugar at home. The patient will have control of the data.”

Electronic records also hold the promise of helping to solve age-old problems in the U.S. health care system, including keeping contact with patients to encourage them to take prescribed treatment regimens. “There is almost $350 billion a year in inefficiency because of lack of compliance and adherence with medications,” said John Castellani, President and Chief Executive Officer, PhRMA. “If you could just get an improvement in whether patients take the medicines that are prescribed, you could capture this great savings.”

“You have kids who have kidney transplants, and you can give them reminders on Facebook that they have to take their medications,” Dr. Rothman added.

 

3. Targeting therapies for increased success.

Electronic medical records can help health care providers ensure that they prescribe the treatments most likely to work for their patients.

“What I think is the promise of electronic medical records is our ability to find subsets of diseases through the broad diseases we treat,” Dr. Rothman said. “Asthma isn’t one disease. Obesity isn’t one disease. Diabetes isn’t one disease. We are going to be able to find subsets of diseases and target therapies [that work]. That’s when you’re going to see efficiency and return on investment.”

 

4. Harnessing the power of big data.

Our health care system has already begun to see the benefits of ‘big data’ with examples such as the discovery of drug side effects and interactions through mining consumer web search data. “We have to use the technologies to bring down the cost of the drug discovery process,” Castellani said.

“Just taking care of the patient, we capture data,” said Dr. Roger Ray, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carolinas HealthCare System. “That allows us to know when a patient…may be at risk for hospital readmission. Having the ability to mine [data]…makes a difference for patients.

“We all, each of us, remember with longing a simpler time when we could scribble and walk off and our job was done,” he added. “What we know now is that’s not very good for the patient. We had no standardization allowing us to help patients avoid lots of different bad outcomes they could have.”

 

Have electronic medical records impacted your health or that of your patients? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

If you would like to suggest a topic, contribute a guest post, or learn more about short-term co-sponsorship opportunities, please contact us at dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com. As a blog currently sponsored solely by the HealthWell Foundation, an independent non-profit providing nationwide financial assistance to insured Americans with high out-of-pocket medication expenses, co-sponsorship helps us keep Real World Health Care alive and well as a resource for journalists, health care professionals, policymakers, and patients. Plus, co-sponsorship will increase your organization’s visibility among thought leaders in the health care sphere.

Do you have a favorite Real World Health Care post? Is there something you’d like to see more of? Post to the comments section or tweet at us at @RWHCblog.

Why We Give to HealthWell Foundation – and Why You Should Too

As the head of a communications strategy shop that helps clients in science, technology, and health care, I encounter a seemingly endless number of organizations that want to do good for society and the planet.  Why then have the WHITECOAT Strategies employees – who serve as editors of Real World Health Care (RWHC) Blog – decided that the HealthWell Foundation should be one of our two charter charities, as our firm becomes a social enterprise in 2014?

David Sheon

David Sheon

Before I answer that, just what is a social enterprise?

A social enterprise is an organization that applies business strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being, rather than maximizing profits for shareholders.

Social enterprises can be structured as for-profit or non-profit organizations, but their focus is using their proceeds to do good.

We decided that organizations seeking communications firms would like to know that revenue from their work is going to help society.  And our employees like to know that too.

When we made the decision to become a social enterprise, we thought about the impact of our work globally and locally.  And that’s how we arrived at helping CA Bikes, as well as the HealthWell Foundation.

CA Bikes is a nonprofit organization founded by Chris Ategeka, a native of Uganda. The oldest of five children, Chris became an orphan and head of his household at an early age after losing both his parents to HIV/AIDS. After years of poverty and laboring in the fields, a miracle happened, as Chris says, when a woman from the United States started an organization called Y.E.S. Uganda near his village, took him in, and supported him through school. Now, Chris holds a BS and an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Many people living in rural Africa have no access to emergency medical services, and given that the nearest health clinic or hospital is often miles away, this results in needless suffering and deaths. CA Bikes builds and distributes bicycle and motorcycle ambulances to rural African villages and trains partners in their maintenance and use to provide access to life-saving care during medical emergencies. For more information about CA Bikes and to help support their work, click here.

The WHITECOAT team is honored to help Chris fulfill the mission of CA Bikes.

WHITECOAT’s history with the HealthWell Foundation dates to a discussion one of my staff members and I had over three years ago.  She told me that her best friend from college had been diagnosed with a brain tumor. He had insurance through his job, which stuck with him through the medical emergency.  His wife had been laid off of her job a month before the diagnosis.  The emotional toll of the diagnosis was awful.  I knew the couple and their children would find their own way to deal with that and there was nothing we could do. But I felt that perhaps we could do something more to find them financial support.

One call to the HealthWell Foundation was all that was needed.  After reviewing financial records and evaluating the situation, the Foundation tapped a fund reserved for medical emergencies that reimbursed not only for the co-pays associated with medication, but also for the cost of the monthly health insurance premium and related medical expenses.  This program has now transformed into the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund, which WHITECOAT is proud to help launch for HealthWell.

HealthWell has awarded more than 265,000 grants to patients in over 40 disease categories, making a profound difference to over 165,000 people faced with difficult medical circumstances in the U.S.

I hope that at this time of giving, you’ll join me and the WHITECOAT staff by donating to the HealthWell Foundation.

Categories: Cost-Savings

MD and DO Medical Schools Consider Major Changes to Education Model

Experts from allopathic medical colleges (those that graduate MDs) and from osteopathic medical colleges (those that graduate DOs) have been actively exploring ways to lower the cost of medical and graduate school without sacrificing the quality of the education.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Groundbreaking recommendations were issued Monday that seek to improve osteopathic medical education in the U.S. and help fuel a new generation of primary care physicians who will be equipped to meet the demands of today’s changing health care landscape. One out of four students headed to medical school this fall are attending osteopathic medical school.

Released by the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) – a medical panel comprised of some of the nation’s leading experts in osteopathic medical education – the report (“A New Pathway in Medical Education”) coincides with publication of a related story in Health AffairsBRC aims to find a solution to the primary care physician shortage by transforming the osteopathic medical education model, reducing inefficiencies and addressing high costs as well as rising student debt.

Osteopathic physicians, or DOs, emphasize “helping each person achieve a high level of wellness by focusing on health promotion and disease prevention” through hands-on diagnosis and treatment, according to the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM). Licensed to practice in all 50 states, DOs work in various environments across specialties.

MD education experts also recognize an urgency for changing medical education. Transforming the way students are trained to practice medicine is key to improving access to quality care for patients, according to an October 30th Perspective article (“Are We in a Medical Education Bubble Market?”) that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). The article underscores why lowering the cost of health care and reducing the cost of medical education go hand in hand.

“If we want to keep health care costs down and still have access to well-qualified physicians, we need to keep the cost of creating those physicians down by changing the way that physicians are trained,” the authors are quoted as saying in a news release from Penn Medicine. “From college through licensure and credentialing, our annual physician-production costs are high, and they are made higher by the long time we devote to training.” 

Cleveland Clinic, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Lead by Example
The Cleveland Clinic’s South Pointe Hospital is partnering with the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OUHCOM) to implement the BRC findings through a new pathway that has five components:

  • Focus on community needs served by primary care physicians.
    Emphasize primary prevention and improvement of public health to raise the quality and efficiency of care.
  • Advance based on knowledge, not years of study.
    Build a curriculum that centers on biomedical, behavioral and clinical science foundations so that the graduates’ readiness for practice can be better assessed through outcomes specific to medical education.
  • Boost clinical experience.
    Offer clinical experience from the first year instead of doing so later on. Increase responsibility throughout the training, and streamline training between undergraduate and graduate school to avoid redundancies and inefficiencies.
  • Require a range of experiences.
    These should include hospital, ambulance, and community health systems to provide the best learning experience.
  • Require modern health system literacy.
    Focus on health care delivery science including principles of high quality, high value, and outcomes-based health care environments.

Dr. Robert S. Juhasz, DO, president of South Pointe Hospital, says that Cleveland Clinic and OUHCOM will work to develop a curriculum that emphasizes early clinical contact to ensure “we are providing the right care, in the right setting for the right person at the right time.”

The partnership, Dr. Juhasz says, “will transform primary care education,” and go far to help shift the focus of medical education “toward competency-based rather than time-based education. We want learners to be engaged, practice-ready primary care physicians and be equipped to care for the communities they serve.”

South Pointe, which has trained DOs for 40 years, is renovating its facilities to now accommodate OUHCOM. Starting in July, 2015 it will train 32 osteopathic medical student residents per class.

The implications of BRC’s recommended changes, according to Dr. Juhasz, “will enhance our primary care base for delivery of care in a patient-centered model, increasing access and quality and reducing costs,” while also cultivating a learning environment that will “encourage more students to enter DO and find hope and joy in serving patients so that they will want to work in the area they train.”

Lead author of the NEJM article — David A. Asch, MD, MBA, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Health Care Innovation at Penn Medicine — says that medical colleges can play a critical role in helping to avoid a burst in the “medical education bubble.” One solution is for schools to lower the cost of tuition and reduce high debt-to-income ratios that could discourage medical students from pursuing careers in fields where more physicians are needed, including primary care.

“Doctors do well financially,” he says, “but the cost of becoming a doctor is rising faster than the benefits of being a doctor, and that is catching up to primary care more quickly than orthopedics, and that ratio is close to overtaking the veterinarians.”

Now tell us what you think. What ways do you think medical school could be overhauled? What incentives can be provided to attract more students to study medicine and become doctors, particularly in primary care, to help reduce the rising provider shortage?

Help A Sick Child this Holiday Season

No family should ever have to wonder whether they can afford to save their child’s life, but that very question haunts families all over the country, every day. Through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund,® however, we are working to change that — because no adult or child should go without health care because they can’t afford it.

In just two months, the HealthWell Foundation awarded  grants of up to $5,000 to more than 20 families. These grants help children like Anna, who was born with a rare disorder affecting the brain known as Sturge-Weber Syndrome. A grant from Pediatric Assistance Fund eased the financial burden that Anna’s family faced after the radical surgery she underwent to help stop her seizures and stroke-like episodes. Now instead of having to choose between paying the bills and affording life-saving treatment, Anna’s family can focus on her recovery and watching her grow up.

Photo (left): Earlier this year, Anna had surgery for a rare brain disorder. Photo (right): Now she is back home, seizure free -- healing and growing.

Photo (left): Earlier this year, Anna had surgery for a rare brain disorder.
Photo (right): Now she is back home, seizure free — healing and growing.

We want to empower even more families just like Anna’s, so they can afford the treatments their children desperately need. That’s why, during this season of giving, we’re urging you to donate to the Pediatric Assistance Fund so we can help the next family, just in time for the holidays. 100 percent of your tax-deductible gift will go directly to patient grants and services to help children start or continue critical medical treatments.

In the following letter, Anna’s mom Mary from Delta, Pennsylvania, shares the challenges of affording care for their little girl and the big difference that HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund grant made in their lives:

Our daughter, Anna was born with a birthmark on her face and scalp. The doctors suspected there was more to the story. A CT scan of her head confirmed the diagnosis of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, a rare disorder affecting the brain. We spent the next few weeks as new parents trying to understand our beautiful little girl and the rare disease she had. When she was just 3 weeks old, she had her first set of seizures. It was terrifying to see her little body so out of control. She was admitted to the hospital and started on medication. The doctors were able to control the seizures, but never for too long.

Since that first seizure many years ago, we have celebrated many days without seizures and suffered through the days when they eventually returned. We changed medications, avoided activity that might over fatigue her, struggled through specialized diets and prayed for a cure. In January, Anna was scheduled to undergo a radical surgery to remove the diseased half of her brain. We knew this could offer her a future without seizures, but we also knew the incredible cost we faced.

With the help of the HealthWell Foundation, Anna had her surgery. She is back home, seizure free – healing and growing. Our family has been able to focus our attention on Anna’s recovery knowing the financial burden has been reduced.

We are so grateful for the financial support the HealthWell Foundation has offered to us. With their help, we are able to celebrate the wonderful little girl God has blessed us with and we look forward to her bright future.

Give to the Pediatric Assistance Fund today so we can make life a little easier for more families with children facing chronic or life-altering conditions.

Categories: Cost-Savings

Will You Be There for Stella?

When patients are diagnosed with cancer, the last thing they should have to worry about is money. That’s why the HealthWell Foundation is planning to open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). This Fund is something completely new and different – created specifically to help people with expenses not covered under HealthWell’s traditional copay fund structure.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

For example, HealthWell will be able to grant as little as $25 to help someone pay for anti-nausea medicine and larger grants for things such as surgical expenses and diagnostic testing that piled up during their treatment. HealthWell has provided direct financial assistance so that more than 70,000 insured people living with cancer can afford their medical treatments.

Once open, ECRF will enable HealthWell to continue helping even more cancer patients just like Stella — wife, mother and caregiver from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, who was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. As Stella describes in her letter below, HealthWell’s grant was exactly what she needed to help her afford her treatments and continue caring for her family:

Dear Friends,

The past two years have been pretty bad for my husband and me. On February 21, 2011 we lost our only daughter to Scleroderma – a devastating disease that shrunk her skin, took her bones, her kidneys, her heart and finally her life – even though she had the best medical care available in Atlanta, GA.

We didn’t think things could ever be that bad again but, in July of that year, I was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – Type B. In August, our son (and only remaining child) was diagnosed with Stage IV prostate cancer. We feared that we would lose both our children in the same year; however, he was treated very aggressively with radiation and hormones and now is in remission.

My husband turned 90 this year and has bladder cancer, prostate cancer, he just had a melanoma removed from his face and two weeks later a squamous cell carcinoma was removed from his arm. The tests showed complete removal (how thankful we are for that). So far, we have been able to keep up with the copays for everything until non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma struck me. Without your generous support the winter of 2011 and June of 2012, I could not even have begun my treatment. But the Lord is good! He led me to a great medical team who led me to you kind folks and my treatment began in October 2011. I am now scheduled for four treatments, beginning in May and another four beginning in November, after which my doctor thinks I won’t need any more for a while.

Could you possibly help me with the series of treatments? I just have to get well. My husband is 90 years old and besides the cancer in various parts of his body, he is losing his eye sight, his memory (it is bad) and his hearing. There is no one else to take care of him. I am the last living of my family and he has one sis

ter who is in worse health than he is. Please! Let me know if you can help me in any amount. I will be eternally grateful. Please forgive the length of this letter. When I began writing, it just all poured out. I have no one to talk to about this, so thanks for listening.

Stella – Baton Rouge, LA

P.S. Please accept my meager check in the amount of $25.00. I hope there will be more available in time.

Money is the Last Thing A Cancer Patient Should Have to Worry About

Patients just like Stella who had nowhere else to turn are counting on HealthWell for financial relief right now. But for ECRF to open, we must raise $50,000 and have a long way to go before we hit our goal. So far we’ve raised $20,640 but aren’t there yet. Can we count of you to help us reach out goal?

Click here to learn about ECRF, and donate whatever you can — $5, $10, $25 — so we can make life easier for more patients who are struggling to survive.

Categories: Cost-Savings

We Need a Little Certainty

When you’ve been diagnosed with cancer like me, you’re faced with an overwhelming amount of uncertainty. Did they catch it in time? Will the treatments work? And for many cancer patients, can I afford good treatment?

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

The Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF) could answer this question, but only if the HealthWell Foundation receives the donations it needs in order to open it.

It’s both sad and frustrating that here, in one of the most highly developed nations in the world, many cancer patients have to wonder if they can afford to save their own lives. Unfortunately, even having health insurance is not always enough of a safety net to avoid personal financial collapse while fighting the fight of your life.

As the bills start to roll in, so too does a new wave of uncertainty: Can you afford what you need to get better?

Providing assistance to people living with cancer has always been a priority for organizations like the HealthWell Foundation. Since 2004, HealthWell has been leading the way in bringing financial relief to more than 70,000 cancer patients with copay assistance through more than 20 oncology funds – yet so many more need help.

That is why I’m turning to you today. HealthWell has made the decision to create the ECRF. It is not yet open, but I want that to change. And for that to happen, HealthWell needs your help today.

Once launched, the ECRF will help people with expenses not covered under traditional current cancer copay funds, expanding services to even more cancer patients who have exhausted all other options and have no one to turn to.

For example, the ECRF can grant as little as $25 to help someone pay for anti-nausea medicine. Larger grants can also help patients overwhelmed by medical expenses accumulated during their treatment, such as medical equipment needs and diagnostic testing.

The ECRF will follow patients every step of the way through their treatment or recovery. It will almost be like having another caregiver watching out for your well-being. And for those of us who have lived through or are living with cancer, we know how important that caregiver network can be.

To that end, I would like to personally recognize and thank all of the health care providers at Abington Memorial Hospital and The Rosenfeld Cancer Center who took such good care of me during my recent treatments for breast cancer. From my initial diagnosis through my follow-up visits, every physician, nurse, therapist and technician I’ve encountered has treated me with both professionalism and the compassion and kindness a cancer patient needs to get through the day.

Compassion and kindness – they’re like life-giving oxygen to a cancer patient. But compassion and kindness aren’t just the hallmark of professional caregivers and loved ones. The ECRF will be proof of that, but HealthWell first has to raise enough money to open the fund so patients can benefit from it.

And that’s where your support comes in. If you want to show compassion and kindness to those with cancer, now is the time. Give to ECRF today so that HealthWell can launch the fund and help cancer patients avoid one more uncertainty in their lives.

Are You Ready to Show Your Purple to Stop Alzheimer’s?

Advocates nationwide are gearing up to participate in activities around Alzheimer’s Action Day on September 21, a pre-event to World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in November. As the facts demonstrate, the need for education and action around this disease is great. A form of progressive dementia that adversely impacts memory, thinking and behavior, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and there is no cure.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

To build support and increase visibility, the Alzheimer’s Association leverages Alzheimer’s Action Day to educate the public and fund research for Alzheimer’s, urging individuals to “Go Purple to End Alzheimer’s.” The association empowers supporters to raise money for Alzheimer’s research with the following creative ideas that can be used in the workplace, at school or at home:

  • Go purple at your office or campus by encouraging your co-workers or your peers to wear purple.
  • Decorate common areas at your workplace or school with purple. Share the latest stats and trends about the disease, like the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s. Call (800) 272-3900 to request fact sheets.
  • Go “Casual for the Cause” at work. Order $5 stickers from the association that you can then sell in your office to raise funds. Download a flier here and e-mail Kaarmin Ford at kaarmin.ford@alz.org for stickers.
  • Host a dinner party at your home and ask each attendee to donate what they would have spent going out. Click here to download meal ideas that can be used at home or in the cafeteria.
  • Invite your friends to Tailgate to Tackle Alzheimer’s starting this month. Supporters who host these purple-themed tailgates can ask participants to donate $5 to help the 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s.

Over the past decade, Alzheimer’s has become an even more urgent public health crisis, demanding greater attention from both a patient care and cost-savings standpoint:

  • Five million Americans and one in three seniors live with Alzheimer’s.
  • Since 2000, the number of deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s has increased by 68 percent.
  • The disease accounts for 50-80 percent of all dementia cases.
  • Alzheimer’s will cost the nation an estimated $203 billion this year.
  • Costs are expected to increase by 500 percent by the year 2050, meaning that the annual cost will swell to $1.2 trillion.

The Alzheimer’s Association is collaborating with partners from around the country to help communities “Go Purple.” These include the Las Vegas CME – Medical and Health Education for All, the California Association of School Health Educators (CASHE) and Cox 11, a community station in Hampton Roads, VA, which are all spreading the word about ways to get involved at the local level. Ruby Tuesday will also raise awareness for Alzheimer’s Action Day at select locations, giving 20 percent of purchases to the Walk to End Alzheimer’s when customers present a flyer to their server on September 21.

“Supporting Alzheimer’s Association specifically on Alzheimer’s Action Day will help generate much needed awareness about this disease and what we can do as a community to support families with this disease on a daily basis,” a Ruby Tuesday spokeswoman said. “With the GiveBack Program specifically, we hope to raise funds within the communities of our restaurant that will directly contribute to research and ultimately find a cure for Alzheimer’s.”

What are you doing in your community to educate colleagues, peers, family and others about this disease? How can other stakeholders – including health systems and government – get more involved and join in efforts to raise awareness around the impact of Alzheimer’s year-round?

Categories: Access to Care

The President and His Stent: How the Patient-Physician Relationship Represents What Works Best in U.S. Health Care

BassTed_jpg

Dr. Ted A. Bass

The decision by former President George W. Bush and his doctors to treat a blockage in one of his heart arteries with angioplasty and stenting has become the newest chapter in the intense debate over appropriateness in stenting.

Bush’s physical examination revealed irregularities that led to tests that revealed a blockage in his coronary artery, which Bush and his doctors decided to treat with a stent, according to his statement. That he was not having a heart attack and apparently had not felt any symptoms, such as chest pain, brought objections from those who would place sharp limits on the use of stents.

Only President Bush’s physicians and family know what alternative therapy choices were presented to Bush, but we do know medical advances allowed him to choose from several therapeutic courses. Bush, in consultation with his doctors, chose the one that was right for him and the quality of life he wished to maintain.

High quality medical care is patient-centered. We strongly value the right of patients, with their doctors, to make informed choices in line with their health and quality of life goals. This right is threatened by critics who would “reform” the health care system by ignoring the complex nature of medicine, cardiovascular disease and the individual needs of each patient.

For those who are quick to dismiss the benefit of stents, I would encourage them to speak to our patients. As a practicing interventional cardiologist, I see first-hand the benefits of interventional cardiology procedures. I see it when a patient’s life is saved during a heart attack, in infants born with a serious heart defect whose hearts beat strong because of advances of interventional care and in seniors who enjoy productive lives again after a minimally invasive heart procedure. In patients with stable coronary artery disease, stenting reduces chest pain from poor circulation of the heart arteries, decreases the need for repeat procedures, and improves the overall circulation of the heart.

And this is what the President Bush case demonstrates:  Health care decisions must be made between the patient and his or her doctor. As outsiders in the Bush case, we do not presume to make that decision for him – nor should others. While it is important to review patient cases to continually improve, learn from and advance the science of medicine, we must not judge the appropriateness of a medical decision on the basis of limited information. To do so is to rush to a judgment that is short sighted, uninformed and, ultimately, emphasizes attention-seeking soundbites over patient care.

In our quest to reduce costs and ensure that appropriate and optimal treatment is provided to each patient and is in step with the guidelines, let us not forget the doctor-patient relationship at the heart of all we do as physicians. It is a fundamental trust that must not be jeopardized.

Now tell us what you think. Do you agree that stents are beneficial to patients? Why or why not? What does the case of President Bush illustrate in terms of the doctor-patient relationship?

August Health Awareness Days Provide Opportunities to Take Action

As young people across the country go back to school, patient advocates and government stakeholders are leveraging awareness days to help communities learn about health issues impacting children, prevention strategies and efforts to improve care. Here are some examples:

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month
Each August organizations including the Envision Foundation underscore the need for screenings and examinations to promote early detection, intervention and prevention of vision problems in children.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Vision disorders in children cost Americans more than $5.7 billion in direct and indirect expenses each year, while the overall cost of vision problems nationwide soars to an estimated $139 billion (includes long-term care, productivity loss and medical bills), according to Prevent Blindness America. Treating eye disorders and vision loss early in life helps protect children from developing chronic, lifelong conditions that become more expensive to treat because of long-term, indirect costs that increase as populations age.

“The beginning of a new school year is an exciting time in a child’s life,” Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a statement.  “By working together with parents and educators, we hope to give all our kids a bright and healthy start!”

National Immunization Awareness Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) highlights the need to improve national immunization coverage levels throughout August. To communicate the importance of immunizations now and throughout the year, NPHIC also developed a toolkit tailored to various populations including babies and pregnant women, pre-teens and teens, young adults, and adults. The toolkit seeks to:

  • Encourage parents of young children to get recommended immunizations by age 2.
  • Help parents ensure older children, preteens and teens have received all recommended vaccines by the time they return to school.
  • Remind college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories.
  • Educate adults, including health care workers, about vaccines and boosters they may need.
  • Urge pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect newborns from diseases like whooping cough.
  • Raise awareness that the next flu season is only a few months away.

The CDC also makes a wide array of resources available for those who want to learn more about the importance of immunizations or spread the word.

Neurosurgery Outreach Awareness Month
The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is among the organizations that underscores why the beginning of the school year is a great time to educate communities about strategies to prevent sports-related head and neck injuries like concussions. AANS provides tools to help others more effectively identify symptoms of potentially serious head/neck injuries and take preventive steps to ensure safety, also offering the following tips:

  • Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials for sports 100 percent of the time.
  • Remain abreast of the latest guidelines and rules governing sports with a high prevalence of head injuries including cheerleading, volleyball, and soccer.

“Concussion awareness, understanding the symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” AANS Public Relations Committee chair Kevin Lillehei, MD, FAANS, said in a statement. “Educating the public is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries. That is why it’s so important to raise awareness in the community and explain just what some of the effects are that these injuries have.”

Psoriasis Awareness Month
Sponsored by The National Psoriasis Foundation each year, Psoriasis Awareness Month is dedicated to “raise awareness, encourage research and advocate for better care for people with psoriasis.”

The most common autoimmune disease in the US affecting 7.5 million Americans, Psoriasis occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth of skin cells and produce red, scaly patches that itch and bleed. About 20,000 children under 10 are also diagnosed, often experiencing symptoms that include pitting and discoloration of the nails, severe scalp scaling, diaper dermatitis or plaques.

As part of Psoriasis Awareness Month, NPF is creating a community of “Pscientists” to “answer real‑world questions about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.”

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month
Although it’s considered a “rare disorder” with approximately 1 in 6000 babies born affected by it, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease that causes voluntary muscles to weaken and in some cases can lead to death, according to the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Types I, II and III belong to a group of hereditary diseases that weaken the voluntary muscles in the arms and legs of infants and children, contributing to breathing issues, difficulty eating and drinking, impaired mobility and orthopedic complications.

Families of SMA, which has coordinated activities around SMA Awareness Month since 1996, and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), are two national organizations that support those living with SMA. Click here to learn about events this month, community networks and research projects for treatment and therapies.

What activities are taking place in your community to support one or more of these awareness days? What could the institutions in your neighborhood, workplace or at your school be doing year-round to more effectively engage populations about critical health issues?

Categories: Access to Care