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How to Help Sick Kids Get Better When Insurance Isn’t Enough

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.

Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services and prescription drug copays. This week, we’d like you to meet Karis, whose family can’t afford her type 1 diabetes testing supplies.

Imagine this: You take your child to the doctor thinking she has an infection. You discover that she has a life-altering condition and your health insurance doesn’t cover all the costs.

That’s what happened to Alicia Bell when her daughter Karis was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Says Bell: “There are no vacations from being a parent, and there are no vacations from being a parent of a T1D child.”

Bell was not only surprised at her daughter’s diagnosis, she was further amazed to find her insurance wouldn’t pay for all the diabetic testing supplies Karis would need.


Did You Know?

60% of bankruptcies in the U.S. are related to medical expenses.


The Bell family is far from unique. Each year, more and more Americans are forced to choose between paying for lifesaving treatments and for food, housing and utilities. People may cut pills in half, skip meals or housing payments or declare bankruptcy. An estimated 29 million Americans are underinsured and more than 60 percent of all bankruptcies in the U.S. are related to medical expenses. In the Bells’ case, Alicia would need to go into serious credit card debt just to pay for her daughter’s diabetes monitoring and testing supplies.

“I would never want money to factor into my daughter’s health care,” Bell says. “I’d sell my

Karis and her new insulin monitor

Karis and her new insulin monitor

house and everything I own if I had to.”

Fortunately, when health insurance is not enough, there is a group that helps close the gap, putting life-changing medications within reach for thousands of people in need and helping to pay for prescription drug copayments, deductibles and health insurance premiums for critical treatments.

A HealthWell Foundation Pediatric Assistance Fund grant not only pays for Karis’ supplies—including an insulin monitor, so Karis doesn’t have to have her finger stuck several times a day—it pays the co-insurance for her hospital and clinic visits and will help pay for an insulin pump if and when she needs one.

Your generous gift to the HealthWell Foundation can help kids like Karis and others afford the medical treatments they desperately need. Consider a monthly gift, a tribute or memorial donation, or an employer-sponsored fundraiser or end-of-year giving campaign to make an extraordinary and lasting difference in the lives of kids in need. Donate today.

How HealthWell Foundation’s MS Fund Helped Charlie Get His Life Back on Track

Editor’s Note: Real World Healthcare will be taking a brief hiatus during the month of August. During this time, we’d like to share with you some of the compelling stories we’ve published about patients facing both medical and financial hardships.:

Charlie Barron

Charlie Barron

Charlie Barron was raised to set goals, make plans, get things done. But setting and meeting goals has become exceptionally hard since Charlie, 46, discovered he has multiple sclerosis.

Because of his MS, Charlie is unable to work and therefore struggles to pay for the expensive treatments he has needed since he was diagnosed in 2010, a decade after his symptoms first appeared. He received HealthWell Foundation grants in 2014 and 2015.

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A Note from Our Sponsor: Are you, or is someone you love, an MS patient on Medicare in Need of Financial Assistance? Click here to visit the HealthWell Foundation’s eligibility page.

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Before his diagnosis, this resident of DeKalb, Ga., had a career as a chef. On the job, he often stood 12-14 hours a day, despite a pins- and-needles sensation in his feet and numbness in his legs that went on for years. For a long time, he considered his physically demanding work the cause of his pain, yet his employer provided no health insurance.

Later, Charlie combined his cooking skills with his interest in fitness to open his own business.  As a personal trainer, he led clients in morning workouts in their homes, then cooked them a healthy breakfast in their kitchens. At that point, he bought himself health insurance.

However, his insurance policies have been unreliable in covering his medications. For instance, his first medication was covered, but when it proved ineffective for him, his insurance company declined to pay for the next prescribed treatment. Moving from private insurance, he obtained Medicare coverage through disability and thought those challenges would change. Recently his doctor recommended adding a second drug to Charlie’s treatment plan which has staved off relapses for the last two years, but the out-of-pocket expense was still unmanageable.

In a note thanking the Foundation for its financial assistance, Charlie described how he felt when he found out the cost of his care.  “Even though I was ready to physically fight to get my life back from MS, my finances were not so ready for battle,” he wrote. “I learned that the medication my doctor prescribed would cost upwards of $1,100 per month. I felt that I had been knocked down before I even had a chance to throw the first punch.”

“The HealthWell Foundation has given me the peace of mind to focus my energy on fighting MS and encouraging others to do the same,” Charlie’s letter said.  He continues learning about MS at a local MS center, takes physical therapy and has participated in activities such as a painting class with others coping with MS.

Social media connects him with additional people with the illness. Hearing about others’ experiences with MS, giving them encouragement or simply offering a kind word to lift their spirits gives Charlie strength.

Benefiting from the supportive care of his wife, brother-in-law and 13-year-old daughter, he urges other people with MS to seek support from family or a strong support group.  For caregivers, he recommends researching MS through the Internet, books or the MS Society to know what to expect.

Not comparing the present with the past is important to him as well. “It’s not about what you used to do, it’s about what you are trying to do now,” Charlie says.

Are you an MS patient like Charlie? How are you coping with the disease and its treatment costs? Let us know in the comments.

 

Tough Choices Await ACA Exchange Applicants

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

After more than two decades of being covered under employer-sponsored medical plans, my consultant husband and I (a freelance writer) are now in the position of having to purchase our own health coverage.

We both have found the online Health Insurance Marketplace fairly easy to navigate. After entering our zip code and ages, a list of available plans pops up. This list can be sorted either by monthly premium or by deductible, making it easy to see estimated costs at a glance. This is where the tough choices start.

HMO, PPO or POS? A higher monthly premium and lower deductible, or a lower monthly premium with a higher deductible? Choose a plan that our current health care providers accept or try a new plan and find new providers? What about drug coverage and doctor visit co-pays?

For millions of previously uninsured Americans who will enter the Marketplace for the first time and will subsequently find themselves underinsured, these choices can represent possible unseen financial hurdles. That’s because, while the ACA does a great job of providing health care for people who previously had been uninsured, it does not address the continued financial pressure on the underinsured.

As Aaron E. Carroll, professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, points out in a recent New York Times column, the ACA may actually be helping to spread the problem of underinsurance. The point of having insurance, he says, is to be able to get care when you need it, without too large a financial burden. Underinsured Americans – while in a better position than the uninsured – are not receiving this benefit though and can’t get the care they need, according to Carroll.

One is considered underinsured if his or her out-of-pocket health care costs exceed 10 percent of income (5 percent when income is less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level), or when one’s insurance deductible is more than 5 percent of income. According to a 2014 survey conducted by the Commonwealth Fund, 13 percent of insured Americans fall into this category.

What happens when the newly insured become the newly underinsured? Although they now have access to preventive care and other services, many – two out of five according to the Commonwealth Fund survey – delayed needed care because of unaffordable deductibles. They did not go to the doctor when sick, did not get a preventive care test, skipped a recommended follow-up test or did not get needed specialty care. Unfortunately, these cost pressures hit hardest among those who need care the most, as people with chronic health problems are more likely to spend large shares of their income on medical costs not covered by their insurance than insured adults in better health.

Choosing a health plan can be complicated, no matter what your income level or health situation. Fortunately, the Health Insurance Marketplace offers tips on how to choose a plan, taking into account plan category, monthly premiums, out-of-pocket costs, type of insurance plan and provider network and benefits. This may be a good place to start. Other tips are available from Consumer Reports.

“The Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum categories within the ACA provide some clarity in the purchasing process,” says Bryan E. Neely, President, HR Ally. “Individuals should purchase insurance first by cost/affordability, then by benefits including copays and deductibles. Many Americans are finding that they actually qualify for Medicaid, especially in those states where Medicaid has been expanded per the ACA.”

In addition to cost pressures, the newly insured/underinsured may find it difficult to receive care as some providers place caps on the number of new patients they will take on in order to manage their workload – a problem that will become more acute in the face of a looming shortage of primary doctors.

Nobody yet knows what the full impact will be of the ACA on the ability of health care providers to improve health outcomes among underinsured Americans. But it is an issue that bears watching. Let us know what you think in the comments section.

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Please Help on #GivingTuesday.

ECRFjumboCancer Doesn’t Care.

It doesn’t care that a patient can’t afford pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center. Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Do you?

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day where families, individuals, and businesses will come together with a common purpose: giving thanks and helping others.  #GivingTuesday is an annual opportunity to celebrate generosity and donate or volunteer for your charity of choice.  Show that you care about cancer patients by giving to HealthWell’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF).

Whether or not you can make a donation, we’d like your help to build awareness for the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. One of the easiest ways to help is to share our graphics and messaging (below) with your networks.

1. Please join me in support of @HealthWellOrg’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. Click here to donate today: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

2. Join us on #GivingTuesday to help #cancer patients cover critical out-of-pocket expenses. http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

3. Provide meaningful comforts to cancer patients by supporting the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

With your support, we will be able to open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund to assist qualified cancer patients so they can better manage their road to recovery…when waiting another day is not an option.

We hope that you will consider helping HealthWell. Together, we can make the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund a reality. Learn how you can make a difference in the life of a cancer patient.  Join us in showing that you care by donating and reaching out to friends and family through your social network.

This Holiday Season, Give Emergency Relief to Cancer Patients

ECRF_Facebook_wig_boost“You have cancer.”

Those devastating words send chills through us all. As the initial shock subsides the reality of unanticipated expense deals a second, unwelcome blow.

We know from assisting more than 70,000 cancer patients with the cost of their treatments just how financially overwhelming and destructive a cancer diagnosis can be. Cancer Doesn’t Care that a patient can’t afford their pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center.  Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care, but we do.

That’s why during this season of giving, we are proud to announce the launch of our “Cancer Doesn’t Care” giving campaign to raise the remaining funds needed to launch the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). The ECRF will allow us to provide immediate grants to qualified cancer patients to assist them with meaningful comforts, such as anti-nausea medicine, travel to and from an appointment, wigs and other hidden expenses.  Giving is as easy as clicking here.

The out-of-pocket critical costs of cancer can be financially devastating. According to a Duke University Medical Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute study, out-of-pocket, cancer-related costs averaged $712 a month. Further, the study found that about 30 percent of respondents said their expenses were a “significant burden” and 11 percent called those expenses a “catastrophic problem.”

The “Cancer Doesn’t Care” campaign asks individuals, celebrities, and corporations for financial and social media support. We’ve created powerful social media graphics and messaging that can be shared to highlight the many ways that cancer affects patients financially.

Cancer patients must pay for so much more than treatment, and every little bit makes a difference. Please help make the holidays a little brighter by donating, and reach out to friends and family through your own social media networks. Share the messages we’ve prepared or create your own.  Even a small donation can make a difference.

Please help ease the burden for someone who has received these three devastating words by asking your social networks to give. On behalf of HealthWell and the thousands of cancer patients we serve, I thank you for caring.

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The HealthWell Foundation is an independent non-profit that provides financial assistance to underinsured Americans to help them afford life-changing medical treatments (and sponsor of this blog).

 

Five Ways to Manage the Costs of Your Medicine

While a main precept of the Affordable Care Act is to expand access to health care, in some cases that improved access means more patients are being treated with medications that come with a cost. As a pharmacist, I have to be an insurance sleuth, use common sense, and teach my patients the old-fashioned methods of negotiation.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

I work in solid organ transplant, HIV, and Hepatitis C medicine. I have patients on regimes ranging from 4 to over 20 medications. For my patients, obtaining consistent, reasonably-priced medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – is vital.

1. Make sure all the medications are at one pharmacy.  It’s important to keep a clinical eye on things for drug interactions. As a bonus, the pharmacist and the patient know what costs need to be examined.

2. Seek out insurance prior authorization.  Some insurance companies require prior authorization to cover certain drugs. Your pharmacist can help you seek prior authorization for medications that require it using software that creates forms specific to each insurance company. Ask if your pharmacist can fill out the form as much as possible before sending it to your doctor.

3. Contact the drug company.  Many pharmaceutical companies offer patient assistance programs or co-pay assistance cards to help eligible patients obtain free medicines, particularly for biologics and expensive drugs. These programs are especially helpful for patients who have insurance gaps and need the medications quickly. Depending on the assistance from a case manager or care coordinator, I have received authorization for medications right away or within 72 hours.

4. Search for a co-pay assistance program that covers your condition.  If your drug company does not offer a patient assistance program or you are not eligible based on your income and insurance coverage, it is possible that a charitable patient assistance program through a non-profit organization such as the HealthWell Foundation may be able to help you.

5. Seek discounts for over-the-counter medications.  Over-the-counter medications can put a strain on the wallet. In many cases, purchasing over-the-counter medications is more expensive than prescription medications covered by insurance. Other items like vitamins, natural supplements, and enteral formulas (also known as ‘milks’) require the patient to do a little negotiating. If you tell the pharmacy or vitamin store you will be taking these items indefinitely, they may be inclined to discount. Also, be on the lookout for buy one get one deals (BOGOs). Finally, enteral formulas can be quite expensive, so if you get prescribed a specially formulated one, ask if you can take a more basic formulation instead. Remember to let your prescriber and pharmacist know which over-the-counter medications and supplements you are using.

In conclusion, while the path to affordable medications is not always easy, there are individuals, programs, and strategies that can help you meet your health care goals.

How do you manage your medications? Share your tips in the comments section.

Categories: General

Live Updates from 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Programs

Because this blog is all about increasing access, lowering costs, and improving patient outcomes, we think there’s no better place for us to share ideas that work than to report live from the 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Program, in Baltimore, March 5-7.  Check back often as we publish updates from sessions, and follow all of the developments by following #PAP2014.

UPDATE 9:45  Resources for navigators: www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org; patient advocacy groups such as AIDS Institute are publishing helpful sites.  Also marketplace.comment@cms.hhs.gov is a place you can send questions. This is monitored 24/7 with staff – not interns – but people who really know how to help.  These are triaged and go up to leadership when there are problems or trends.

UPDATE 9:40 Lessons learned:

  1. Partner’s are critical to success of ACA implementation; reach out early, often because plan selection often isn’t a one step process.  Patients need to come back many times before ready to sign up.  Very real “huge” health literacy gaps.
  2. Things to come: we are in closing days of enrollment.  March Madness may be a great opportunity for outreach; then we’ll reach out to those most in need; final week will be “here we are.”  So theme weeks continue.   After window closes Mar 31, you’ll soon start seeing promotion of the new window.

UPDATE 9:25 25 states and DC have indicated they will expand Medicaid.  About 85% of Americans already have minimum essential coverage.

UPDATE: 9:15 Health care law saved $8.9 M in drug costs for Medicare, said Janet Miller, Division of Strategic Partners, Office of Communications, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  2014 changes: no discrimination due to pre-existing conditions, annual limits on insurance coverage eliminated, small business tax credit increased; more people are eligible for Medicaid in some states.

Essential benefits include at least 10 general categories such as emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, mental health and substance abuse, lab services, preventive and wellness  services and chronic disease management.

Categories: Access to Care

What’s Getting Lost in the Health Care Debate?

Health care has never been more highly politicized than today.

Last year, it was central to the third longest government shutdown in U.S. history. This week, it consumed a large chunk of President Obama’s State of the Union address. Every day, we are inundated by news of health exchange website defects, insurance policy cancellations, coverage that forces people to switch doctors, and a laundry list of other problems attributed to the Affordable Care Act. On the flip side, advocates complain of the problems that make the U.S. rank among the lowest in health system efficiency among advanced economies and hail the health care law as a ray of hope.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Meanwhile, a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that one in four American families struggled to pay medical bills in 2012. Pretty dismal.

But there’s something missing from this barrage of coverage. Incredible advances are being made in health care every day, providing Americans with innovative ways to stay healthy, treat illnesses when they arise, and save money on medical problems. Just this month, a new program was launched to help people on Medicare living with multiple sclerosis afford copays for treatment; the FDA for the first time approved a postnatal test that can help parents identify possible causes of their child’s developmental delay or intellectual disability; and a study published in the Lancet showed that it is possible to train children’s immune systems to become less sensitive to peanuts.

At Real World Health Care, we focus on what is working.

That’s why I am proud to take over this week as editor of Real World Health Care. While much of my professional focus has been on health internationally – advocating for the development of vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, policies that save mothers and infants from dying during childbirth, and the formation of emergency medical systems in places where people have nowhere to turn – I am compelled by the notion that more attention must be focused on solutions that are improving U.S. patient care today. By serving as a central clearinghouse for information about improvements to segments of the U.S. health care system, we hope that our readers and those journalists who get ideas from our blog will be inspired to expand innovations that are working in health care today.

Real World Health Care – only entering its 11th month – already has a reputation for covering solutions to enhance nutrition, prevent diseases, reform medical education, improve hospitals, support patients, fund research, increase treatment adherence, and reduce costs. The blog serves as a resource for policy makers, health systems, research universities, non-profit health organizations, leading biopharmaceutical companies, government agencies, and the nation’s leading health journalists among thousands of others interested in practical and well-researched health care success stories.

We need your help to continue to grow our success. Have an idea for a story or a guest blog? Email me at jrosen@WHITECOATstrategies.com. Want to take part in advancing solutions in health care? Sign up for updates and share stories that inspire you via Twitter at https://twitter.com/RWHCblog. Do you believe in our mission to expedite improvements to our health care system? Consider co-sponsoring the blog while gaining visibility for your organization. We are now followed by over 300 health industry leaders each week, and journalists turn to us for story ideas about the good news on what’s working in our health care system. For more information, email dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com.

I look forward to continuing to cut through the political vitriol around health care with inspiring stories of what is keeping Americans healthy and saving lives. Thank you for giving meaning to our work by using this blog as a resource for yours.

Categories: General

President Obama Urges “Millenials” to Sign up for Coverage under Affordable Care Act

In recent days the Obama Administration has been intensifying outreach efforts to increase the number of young people who enroll for insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) before the March 31, 2014 deadline.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

During a speech in Boston on Oct. 30, President Obama pushed back against criticism of ACA – which he signed into law in March 2010 – by seeking to draw parallels to the Massachusetts’ health care insurance law (“Romneycare”) that then-Governor Mitt Romney signed into law four years earlier.

“And if it was hard doing it just in one state, it’s harder to do it in all 50 states, especially when the governors of a bunch of states and half of the Congress aren’t trying to help. Yes, it’s hard, but it’s worth it. It is the right thing to do, and we are going to keep moving forward. We are going to keep working to improve the law, just like you did here in Massachusetts.”

Governor Romney, on the other hand, rejected the comparison, describing the “Obamacare” rollout as a “frustrating embarrassment” that has failed to learn “the lessons of Massachusetts’ health care.”

However, the two laws did face similar challenges at the start of their implementation, especially among young people. Romneycare saw an extremely low registration rate among younger demographics until the deadline. Likewise – although the White House set a goal of getting 2.7 million 18-34 year olds signed up through HealthCare.gov by the end of March – a recent study by the Commonwealth Fund revealed that only one in five people who visited the federal or state enrollment sites were 18-29.

A Dec. 4 article in The New York Times makes the case that many young people are likely to follow enrollment patterns that were similar to those in Massachusetts in 2006 – by pushing it off until the deadline hits.

“The experience of Massachusetts under Gov. Mitt Romney showed that most people, especially young people, acted only when they approached a deadline,” write Jonathan Weisman and Michael Shear, “and with the federal law, the deadline to have insurance or pay a penalty is months away.”

According to an Oct. 30 article in Business Insider, two former Massachusetts officials who played major roles in creating and rolling out the Massachusetts health law — Jonathan Gruber and Jon Kingsdale – say successful implementation of massive health care changes can come slowly at first:

“In Massachusetts, the officials said, only .03% of the share of Massachusetts residents who eventually enrolled for health insurance signed up in the first month the law went into effect. In the final month of enrollment, before the mandate to purchase insurance kicked in, more than 20% of the final tally signed up.”

Last week President Obama renewed strategies to increase enrollment rates by actively engaging young people, who are widely seen as critical to the financial stability of Obamacare. Addressing 160 participants from across the country at the Dec. 4 Youth Summit, the President urged “Millenials” – including DJs, entrepreneurs and organizational heads – to talk up Obamacare and get their peers to sign up on HealthCare.gov.

The Washington Post is reporting signs that enrollment among younger Americans is beginning to pick up, with a three-day total of about 56,000 from Dec. 1-3 – more than twice the number of online signups on HealthCare.gov during the entire month of October.

Now tell us what you think. Can Romneycare serve as an effective model for implementation of Obamacare, especially with respect to generating more signups among younger population demographics? What, if any, provisions from that law are applicable to rolling out the ACA? Have you tried to enroll on HealthCare.gov and were you successful?

Categories: Access to Care

Make Life a Little Easier for Sick Children This #GivingTuesday

Cyndi from Midland, TX didn’t know how she was going to pay for the asthma medication her son Ethan desperately needed. Feeling like nothing was going right and not knowing where to turn, she was on the verge of losing hope. Then something dramatic happened that would change everything. Cyndi discovered the HealthWell Foundation:

Cyndi didn't know how she was going to pay for her son Ethan's (right) asthma medication until she found the HealthWell Foundation.

Cyndi didn’t know how she was going to afford asthma medication for her son Ethan (right) until she applied to the HealthWell Foundation for financial assistance.

Our son was born very sick. He spent 5 weeks in the NICU, 2 of which were on a ventilator. When we finally brought him home, we knew I had to stay home with him. If we put him in daycare, we knew he would get sick and that would be hard on his lungs. With me not working, it put a huge cloud over our finances. We quickly found out that his asthma medication was not cheap, even with insurance. I also found out that there isn’t a lot of help for people who have insurance and a decent job. I spent hours and hours on the Internet and the phone trying to find some help. One day I found HealthWell. We applied thinking we would be denied. The day I got the acceptance letter in the mail, I sat on the kitchen floor and cried. I felt a sense of relief. Finally, something was going right. We cannot be more grateful for all the help HealthWell has given us. 

When you give to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund for #GivingTuesday, you will make a difference for children who have been diagnosed with a chronic or life-altering condition, just in time for the holidays. Every penny of your donation will help us provide financial assistance to patients so they can afford the rising cost of care:

  • To date, HealthWell has awarded more than 274,000 grants to insured adults and children across all of our funds to help them afford treatments.
  • In just two months, we awarded grants of up to $5,000 to more than 20 families.

No family should ever have to wonder whether they can afford to save their child’s life. By giving to the Pediatric Assistance Fund, you will help us remain a lifeline for families so they can afford life-saving treatment for their sick children.

Your gift will help ensure that families with children who have chronic conditions – including leukemia, cystic fibrosis, or juvenile diabetes – are not forced to choose between paying the bills and affording quality care. Here’s a breakdown of how donations, large and small, will have a tangible impact:

  • $10 covers the cost of diabetes test strips for Michael for one month.
  • $45 supports Yessenia’s pituitary hormone treatment for 1 week.
  • $75 covers Quinnlian’s lesion treatment for immunosuppressive disease for one month.

Start the holidays off right by donating to HealthWell for #GivingTuesday and make life a little easier for more families like Ethan’s. Your gift will make the season brighter for children and families struggling to afford the medications or treatments they need.

Categories: Cost-Savings