Real World Health Care Blog

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How to Help Sick Kids Get Better When Insurance Isn’t Enough

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.

Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services and prescription drug copays. This week, we’d like you to meet Karis, whose family can’t afford her type 1 diabetes testing supplies.

Imagine this: You take your child to the doctor thinking she has an infection. You discover that she has a life-altering condition and your health insurance doesn’t cover all the costs.

That’s what happened to Alicia Bell when her daughter Karis was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Says Bell: “There are no vacations from being a parent, and there are no vacations from being a parent of a T1D child.”

Bell was not only surprised at her daughter’s diagnosis, she was further amazed to find her insurance wouldn’t pay for all the diabetic testing supplies Karis would need.


Did You Know?

60% of bankruptcies in the U.S. are related to medical expenses.


The Bell family is far from unique. Each year, more and more Americans are forced to choose between paying for lifesaving treatments and for food, housing and utilities. People may cut pills in half, skip meals or housing payments or declare bankruptcy. An estimated 29 million Americans are underinsured and more than 60 percent of all bankruptcies in the U.S. are related to medical expenses. In the Bells’ case, Alicia would need to go into serious credit card debt just to pay for her daughter’s diabetes monitoring and testing supplies.

“I would never want money to factor into my daughter’s health care,” Bell says. “I’d sell my

Karis and her new insulin monitor

Karis and her new insulin monitor

house and everything I own if I had to.”

Fortunately, when health insurance is not enough, there is a group that helps close the gap, putting life-changing medications within reach for thousands of people in need and helping to pay for prescription drug copayments, deductibles and health insurance premiums for critical treatments.

A HealthWell Foundation Pediatric Assistance Fund grant not only pays for Karis’ supplies—including an insulin monitor, so Karis doesn’t have to have her finger stuck several times a day—it pays the co-insurance for her hospital and clinic visits and will help pay for an insulin pump if and when she needs one.

Your generous gift to the HealthWell Foundation can help kids like Karis and others afford the medical treatments they desperately need. Consider a monthly gift, a tribute or memorial donation, or an employer-sponsored fundraiser or end-of-year giving campaign to make an extraordinary and lasting difference in the lives of kids in need. Donate today.

With a Little Help from My Friends, Family… And Apps

“Drugs don’t work in patients who don’t take them.” – C. Everett Koop, former Surgeon General

It was an idea born of near tragedy: an elderly, diabetic father who double-dosed on his insulin therapy and suffered a medical emergency. His two sons realized that if they were more involved in reviewing their father’s daily medication and insulin regimens, it could change his behavior for the better and help him get healthier.

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Photos courtesy of NextGen Healthcare

So Omri and Rotem Shor co-founded the MediSafe Project, a free mobile app that makes it easier for families and friends to give the support needed to help their loved ones get healthier and integrate healthier behavior modification into their everyday lives. In the first four months after its launch, users reported medication adherence rates of 79 percent (82.25 percent for statins) – well above the 50 percent average medication adherence rate reported by the World Health Organization.

The MediSafe Project provides an easy-to-use interface – an interactive pillbox of sorts — over iOS and Android mobile phones. Users input information about their meds by typing their names or photographing their National Drug Code numbers. The system stores the correct pharmaceutical name, manufacturer and dosage, ensuring an error-free medication list in the event of a medical emergency. Users signify taking their meds by dragging pills from the virtual pillbox into a mouth icon, which “swallows” the pills.

Users receive alerts before medication courses are completed, allowing them to order refills in a timely manner. In addition to reminding users when it’s time to take their medication, the MediSafe Project sends alerts to selected family members, friends and caretakers when a loved one misses a dose. Users can also email a personalized list of adherence stats to their doctor, giving doctors better patient oversight between office visits. A prescription page feature lets doctors “prescribe” the MediSafe project to their patients to help better monitor medication adherence.

The impact of non-adherence on the outcomes of patients with cardiovascular diseases is one example that underscores why it is so critical to implement strategies and utilize technologies that improve medication adherence.

“Medication non-adherence is a problem that costs U.S. hospitals billions of dollars every year,” says Omri “Bob” Shor, CEO, MediSafe. “An American dies every nineteen minutes from skipping or taking medication incorrectly. Our goal is to help combat this problem and encourage healthy habits among users and their support systems with easy-to-use technology.”

The MediSafe Project isn’t the only app on the medication adherence scene. The free NextGen® MedicineCabinet app lets users create and update a list of medications, including dosing and schedule information, thus creating their own “personal” medication record.

Notifications are sent for each medication and users can confirm adherence. The app was designed, in part, to improve adherence and proper use of medication by enhancing patients’ understanding of how to correctly take their medication and to recognize adverse reactions. According to the company, it also equips health care professionals with all the relevant information they need, in a way they like to view it.

“Mobile patient engagement is at the forefront of today’s changing health care environment,” said Ike Ellison, executive vice president of business development for NextGen Healthcare, in a statement. “Providing consumer technology that encourages members to control and lead healthier lifestyles is a key factor in improving outcomes.”

Michael Paquin, vice president, business development for NextGen Healthcare, added “One of our users commented on the way that she was able to, for the first time, be able to share her medication lists easily with family, friends and all her physicians. It has saved this particular patient hours of time on a monthly basis.”

Technology-based solutions like the MediSafe Project and the NextGen Medicine Cabinet are among the latest patient-directed tools that improve medication adherence.

However, providers still play an important role in assisting patients in maintaining healthy behaviors like medication adherence. The American College of Preventive Medicine offers a SIMPLE approach on how providers can help their patients take their medications as prescribed.

Barriers to medication compliance abound, with memory issues, lack of support, and lack of education just being a few. What is behind these barriers? How can patient behaviors and motivations be changed?

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Categories: Access to Care