Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: influenza

Get Your Flu Shot Now to Stay Healthier Later

So you think you’re too busy to get your flu shot? It’s easy to put off, but taking the time to do it sooner rather than later could prevent you from getting sick while helping to protect those you care about – during the holidays and beyond. That’s why the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments as well as other health agencies are raising visibility around National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), from Dec. 8-14.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

With the flu season beginning in the fall and not peaking until January-February, it’s certainly not too late to get your influenza shot. In fact, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that everyone 6 months of age or older receive it, including:

  • Children
  • Seniors 65 and older
  • Pregnant women
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives
  • Those with underlying health conditions like asthma
  • Those living with conditions including chronic lung disease, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer and diabetes

Although the effectiveness of flu vaccination varies each year, the CDC reports that recent studies demonstrate the evidence-based public health benefits. The Mayo Clinic agrees, calling flu shots your best defense against the flu, enabling “your body to develop the antibodies necessary to ward off influenza viruses.”

“The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year,” said CDC’s Anne Schuchat, M.D., Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “Today, flu vaccines are available in more convenient locations than ever. The few minutes it takes to get a flu vaccine can save you from experiencing several unproductive days due to influenza. The most common side effects are mild and short-lasting, especially when compared to symptoms of influenza infection.  Flu vaccine cannot cause flu illness.”

Despite evidence that the influenza vaccine is an effective tool, some still fear that getting their shot might put them at risk for experiencing severe side effects. No more than one or two cases per million people vaccinated acquire Guillain-Barré syndrome, an outcome much lower than the risk of developing severe complications from influenza. From 1976-2006, in fact, estimates show that far more people died from flu-associated deaths in the U.S. (3,000-49,000) than from negative reactions to the vaccines that protect against influenza.

To build awareness and support of NIVW and encourage people to get their shots, the CDC is making a rich variety of online tools and resources available to a wide spectrum of patients, educators and providers, such as:

Partnering with Reckitt Benckiser, Inc., the makers of LYSOL® Brand Products, the CDC is also spotlighting the Ounce of Prevention Campaign, which seeks to empower consumers and professionals with practical tips and information around effective hand hygiene and cleaning habits to prevent infectious diseases like the flu.

Click here to see if the vaccine is available in your area. To find a nearby location to get the vaccine, check out HHS’s “Flu Vaccine Finder” on Flu.gov, enter your ZIP code and share the widget to let your family members, colleagues and friends know where they can go too. HHS also provides a series of informative YouTube videos that cover prevention strategies, share tips for identifying symptoms and provide recommended treatment practices.

You can also make a powerful statement by taking the pledge to get vaccinated for the 2013-14 season, commit to taking a friend with you and in the process spread the word by clicking here. To get the latest updates on flu vaccination efforts, follow the CDC on Twitter (@CDCFlu and @CDCgov) and “like” them on Facebook.

Now tell us if you’ve gotten your flu shot. Where did you go? How long did it take? What ways could providers and health care stakeholders more effectively remind patients to get vaccinated?

HPV Vaccine Reduces Infection Rates in Teen Girls

Since the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced in 2006, vaccine-type HPV prevalence has decreased by 56 percent among females 14-19 years old, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. Although the vast majority of HPV infections do not cause serious harm, some will persist and can lead to cervical cancer. Each year in the U.S., about 19,000 cancers caused by HPV occur in women.

“Unfortunately, only one-third of girls aged 13-17 have been fully vaccinated with HPV vaccine,” says CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Our low vaccination rates represent 50,000 preventable tragedies, which means 50,000 girls alive today will develop cervical cancer over their lifetime. This would be prevented if we reach 80 percent vaccination rates. For every year we delay in doing so, another 4,400 girls will develop cervical cancer in their lifetimes.”

Study author Markowitz notes that the decline in vaccine type prevalence could be due to factors such as “Herd” Immunity (also called “community immunity”), which occurs when most members of a community are protected against a contagious disease because a critical portion of the population has been immunized and the opportunities for an outbreak are reduced. “Herd” Immunity has been shown to control a variety of contagious diseases, including measles, mumps, rotavirus (MMR), influenza and pneumococcal disease.

Public health experts recommend routine HPV vaccination at ages 11-12 for both boys and girls. A series of three shots is recommended over six months. HPV vaccination is also recommended for older teens and young adults who were not vaccinated when younger.

The HPV vaccine is not without its critics, and health care providers are not consistently giving strong recommendations for the vaccine, particularly for younger teens, according to the CDC.

“One of the most common criticisms from parents – that their teen is not sexually active yet – misses the point,” suggests Frieden, who says that vaccines should be administered well before people are exposed to an infection.

Frieden also points out that, with the Vaccines for Children Program and the Affordable Care Act, vaccination is easy and cost should not be a barrier because many insurers are required to cover the vaccine at no cost to either female or male patients.

The power of an effective and widespread vaccination program should not be ignored. Smallpox, for example – a serious and sometimes fatal infectious disease – has no specific treatment and is only prevented by a vaccine. Although outbreaks of the disease have occurred from time to time over thousands of years, it is now eradicated worldwide because of a successful and comprehensive vaccination campaign.

A similar initiative is underway to eradicate polio worldwide. The development of effective vaccines to prevent paralytic polio was one of the major medical breakthroughs of the 20th century. Supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has helped to reduce the incidence of polio by more than 99 percent.

As with smallpox, if enough people in a community are immunized, the virus will be deprived of susceptible hosts and will die out. But high levels of vaccination coverage must be maintained to stop transmission and prevent outbreaks.

Will HPV go the way of smallpox and polio thanks to “Herd” Immunity? Do you agree with the CDC that it’s time to ramp up efforts to protect the next generation with the HPV vaccine? Or do you share the critics’ concerns?