Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: heart disease

Get Your Flu Shot Now to Stay Healthier Later

So you think you’re too busy to get your flu shot? It’s easy to put off, but taking the time to do it sooner rather than later could prevent you from getting sick while helping to protect those you care about – during the holidays and beyond. That’s why the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments as well as other health agencies are raising visibility around National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW), from Dec. 8-14.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

With the flu season beginning in the fall and not peaking until January-February, it’s certainly not too late to get your influenza shot. In fact, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that everyone 6 months of age or older receive it, including:

  • Children
  • Seniors 65 and older
  • Pregnant women
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives
  • Those with underlying health conditions like asthma
  • Those living with conditions including chronic lung disease, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer and diabetes

Although the effectiveness of flu vaccination varies each year, the CDC reports that recent studies demonstrate the evidence-based public health benefits. The Mayo Clinic agrees, calling flu shots your best defense against the flu, enabling “your body to develop the antibodies necessary to ward off influenza viruses.”

“The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year,” said CDC’s Anne Schuchat, M.D., Director, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “Today, flu vaccines are available in more convenient locations than ever. The few minutes it takes to get a flu vaccine can save you from experiencing several unproductive days due to influenza. The most common side effects are mild and short-lasting, especially when compared to symptoms of influenza infection.  Flu vaccine cannot cause flu illness.”

Despite evidence that the influenza vaccine is an effective tool, some still fear that getting their shot might put them at risk for experiencing severe side effects. No more than one or two cases per million people vaccinated acquire Guillain-Barré syndrome, an outcome much lower than the risk of developing severe complications from influenza. From 1976-2006, in fact, estimates show that far more people died from flu-associated deaths in the U.S. (3,000-49,000) than from negative reactions to the vaccines that protect against influenza.

To build awareness and support of NIVW and encourage people to get their shots, the CDC is making a rich variety of online tools and resources available to a wide spectrum of patients, educators and providers, such as:

Partnering with Reckitt Benckiser, Inc., the makers of LYSOL® Brand Products, the CDC is also spotlighting the Ounce of Prevention Campaign, which seeks to empower consumers and professionals with practical tips and information around effective hand hygiene and cleaning habits to prevent infectious diseases like the flu.

Click here to see if the vaccine is available in your area. To find a nearby location to get the vaccine, check out HHS’s “Flu Vaccine Finder” on Flu.gov, enter your ZIP code and share the widget to let your family members, colleagues and friends know where they can go too. HHS also provides a series of informative YouTube videos that cover prevention strategies, share tips for identifying symptoms and provide recommended treatment practices.

You can also make a powerful statement by taking the pledge to get vaccinated for the 2013-14 season, commit to taking a friend with you and in the process spread the word by clicking here. To get the latest updates on flu vaccination efforts, follow the CDC on Twitter (@CDCFlu and @CDCgov) and “like” them on Facebook.

Now tell us if you’ve gotten your flu shot. Where did you go? How long did it take? What ways could providers and health care stakeholders more effectively remind patients to get vaccinated?

Advocates Unite to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes During National Diabetes Awareness Month

One in three. That’s the number of people in the United States who will have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue. Twenty-six million Americans – seven million of which are undiagnosed – now live with diabetes and another 79 million have pre-diabetes. To raise awareness and spotlight effective prevention strategies, patient advocates are mobilizing to promote National Diabetes Awareness Month and American Diabetes Month® this November.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

As a disease that constitutes one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, diabetes is a disease in which glucose blood levels are elevated above their normal range. Those living with diabetes are also at higher risk of heart disease and stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

  • Being 45 years of age or older
  • Being overweight
  • Having a family history of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Engaging in physical activity fewer than three times per week
  • Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy)

Although type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented because people are born with it, individuals can lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through a variety of practical strategies. The CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based program for preventing type 2 diabetes. A public-private partnership of community organizations, private insurers, employers, health care organizations and government agencies, it teaches participants how they can incorporate physical activity into daily life and eat more healthfully, helping them to:

  • Cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half
  • Lose 5-7 percent of body weight through modest changes in behavior
  • Reduce the risk of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes by 5 percent

The program pairs people with a lifestyle coach, in a group setting, to receive 16 core sessions and six post-core sessions over the course of a year. These lifestyle coaches work with the participants to identify emotions and situations that can sabotage their success. The group process encourages participants to share approaches for dealing with challenging situations.

Along with their National Diabetes Prevention program, the CDC also provides a Registry of Recognized Programs that lists contact information for community resources offering type 2 diabetes prevention programs. The registry was created to help health care providers more effectively refer their patients to the services they need, while also empowering patients to find and choose the programs that are right for them. For more information about diabetes and other diseases from CDC, you can sign up for e-mail updates here.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is also committed to raising awareness and providing resources around issues such as diabetes risk, family support, and community support. The goal of their campaign – Control Your Diabetes. For Life is to increase awareness about the benefits of diabetes control through education materials, fact sheets, sample articles and PSAs for radio, print and television. A major part of their focus is also placed upon bringing diabetes information to community settings such as schools, worksites, senior centers and places of worship.

“Although the prevalence of diabetes has continued to rise due to the obesity epidemic, the aging of the U.S. population, and increasing numbers of people at high risk for diabetes, there are strong, encouraging indicators of progress in preventing and treating diabetes,” said Joanne Gallivan, M.S., R.D., Director of NDEP. “Today, there is much greater awareness that diabetes is a serious disease, a critical first step in changing outcomes. In 1997, only 8 percent of Americans believed diabetes was serious. In 2011, 84 percent of Americans understood that it is a serious disease.”

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), which works to “raise awareness of this ever growing disease,” leverages American Diabetes Month® to illustrate how diabetes impacts Americans. By asking people to submit photos that show “A Day in the Life of Diabetes,” the ADA plans to create a large mosaic that demonstrates how diabetes affects patients, families and communities nationwide from personal perspectives.

“Participating in ‘A Day in the Life of Diabetes’ for individuals living with diabetes lets them know that the American Diabetes Association is the one leading organization that continues to do research to ‘STOP Diabetes,’ advocate and promote ‘Healthy Lifestyle Management’ to avoid many of the health issues that people with diabetes die from, such as heart disease or stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and amputations,” said Lurelean B. Gaines, RN, MSN, President of Health Care and Education of the Association. “The campaign has grown this year and will continue to grow because every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes.”

To learn more visit ADA’s website at www.diabetes.org and click on Diabetes Basics, Living With Diabetes, Food Fitness, Advocate, In My Community, or News & Research.  Information is available in English and Spanish. You can also “like” ADA on Facebook, follow them on Twitter (@AMDiabetesAssn) or call them at 1-800-Diabetes.

How can your community more effectively collaborate with stakeholders like ADA, CDC and NDEP to prevent diabetes and help those living with the disease?

World Heart Day Underscores Why Exercise and Diet Count

This year’s World Heart Day on Sunday, September 29 will focus on raising awareness around changes that individuals – especially women and children – can incorporate into their daily habits to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Created in 2000 by the World Heart Federation (WHF) to highlight heart disease and stroke as the world’s leading causes of death claiming 17.3 million lives each year, advocates will educate the public about prevention strategies through talks and screenings, walks and runs, concerts and sporting events.

It is expected that by 2030, 23 million people will die of CVD, more than the entire population of Australia. Together with its members, WHF reports that 80 percent of premature deaths from CVD could be reduced if individuals take the following actions:

  • Reduce or discontinue use of tobacco
  • Eat healthfully
  • Engage in physical activity

CVD can affect people of all ages and population groups, including women and children, as illustrated in WHF’s infographic that also shares practical tips on how to eat more healthfully and exercise more frequently. To teach children about healthy heart living, WHF also created a leaflet along with a character, “Superheart,” that encourages:

  • Playing outdoor games
  • Cycling
  • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends increasing daily servings of mostly plant-based foods to help improve cardio health, acknowledging that “many studies have shown that vegetarians seem to have a lower risk of obesity, coronary heart disease (which causes heart attack), high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and some forms of cancer.”

To support better coronary health outcomes, AHA created five goals for healthy eating that encourage individuals to:

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables.
  • Consume more whole grain foods.
  • Use liquid vegetable oils such olive, canola, corn or safflower as your main kitchen fat.
  • Eat more chicken, fish and beans than other meats.
  • Read food labels to help you choose the healthiest option.

AHA also published an info sheet about the warning signs of a heart attack, which often starts slowly and usually goes unnoticed. This is especially true among women, whose symptoms can often mimic those of the flu. Additionally, it is common among women to put others first, especially their children, and so they usually do not recognize symptoms until it is too late. To address this public health challenge, AHA initiated the Go Red for Women campaign to empower women to know their risk, live more healthfully and share their stories.

The primary warning signs of a heart attack remain the same regardless of gender, however:

  • Chest discomfort
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or light headedness

Now tell us your story. Do you know anyone who experienced a heart attack or other heart condition? Are you aware of your own risk level? What could you, your friends or loved ones do differently to live more healthfully?