Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: detection

Profiles in Courage: Beating Breast Cancer One Story at a Time

As we recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, heroes, organizations and allies nationwide are leveraging creative strategies to empower patients and families, educate communities and mobilize supporters to overcome the disease and live healthier.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Are You Dense?

Dedicated to “informing the public about dense breast tissue and its significance for the early detection of breast cancer” Are You Dense? seeks to educate the public and raise awareness around dense breast tissue and the need for early detection through online tools and resources in addition to speaking engagements. This organization helps women diagnosed with breast cancer by highlighting what it’s like to live with the disease, advocating changes to public policy around detection and supporting new and existing research.

Athena® Warriors

From the time she was a little girl, six-time Grammy winner singer/songwriter Amy Grant knew that cancer “was a force to be reckoned with.” Amy was inspired at a young age by the work of her father – an oncologist who spent his entire medical career treating cancer – to join the band of warriors. A tireless advocate, she draws courage from the countless women she helps empower every day to fight breast cancer, along with her fellow warriors: Amanda Beard, Angela Stanford and Karen Gooding.

“I am inspired by every Athena Warrior. If my music can bring women together and make a connection, then I have contributed something. Athena water takes a terrible situation and does something good for many; that’s why I love being an Athena Warrior,” Grant said.

Terror for Ta-Tas

Woods of Terror — a haunted theme park in Greensboro, North Carolina — hosts the annual “Terror for Ta-Tas Night” to benefit breast cancer survivors. A percentage of the proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to Cone Health Cancer Center’s “Finding your New Normal” program for breast cancer survivors.

Tami Knutson, Breast Cancer Center Manager for Cone Health, is passionate about helping Terror for Ta-Tas because she believes it will empower more Americans to live healthier and bring us closer to ending breast cancer.

“I teach young women about self-breast awareness,” Knutson said. “There is not another venue that I have access to young people.  Most health fairs attract people in the middle years and older. I find teaching  in such a crazy, unexpected location very rewarding. It catches people off guard and I think my message is really heard.”

The Terror for Ta-Tas event runs from 7:30–11 p.m. Friday, October 11. For event information visit terrorfortatas.com, and to learn more about the “Finding Your New Normal” program e-mail Tami Knutson at Tami.Knutson@conehealth.com.

Tough Enough to Wear Pink

A non-profit marketing campaign sponsored by Wrangler, Tough Enough to Wear Pink (TETWP) began with breast cancer survivor Terry Wheatley who, with Wrangler, challenged cowboys and cowgirls to wear pink at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo to raise awareness and to honor the women in their lives that had been affected by the disease.  TETWP serves as a springboard for communities to create rodeos and other western events that raise awareness around breast cancer.  By focusing attention on women’s health, this initiative raises money for women’s health education, supports women’s treatment centers and much more.

“The success of the Tough Enough to Wear Pink campaign – which has raised over $14.5 million dollars since its inception in 2004 – is that every community that participates through their rodeo or their western event is encouraged to keep their money locally to do good in their own back yards through contributions to their women’s breast cancer center, the women’s breast cancer wing of the local hospital or whatever breast cancer support group is in need in their community,” Wheatley said. “It is the decision of the local rodeo committee or event on who receives their donation.  The success of the campaign is that it is truly grass-roots, with people raising $5 at a time to support someone in their community.”

For example, Red Bluff Round-Up raises money for breast cancer treatment at the St. Elizabeth Imaging Center in their community of Red Bluff, California, to provide mammograms and other women’s health services directly from the funds generated through their TETWP rodeo event. This is just one of the many examples of how individual rodeos and western events use their funds to help women live healthier lives.

Now tell us how you are touching the lives of women living with breast cancer. What are you doing in your local community, place of worship, school or workplace to spread the word about how we can stop this disease together?

August Health Awareness Days Provide Opportunities to Take Action

As young people across the country go back to school, patient advocates and government stakeholders are leveraging awareness days to help communities learn about health issues impacting children, prevention strategies and efforts to improve care. Here are some examples:

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month
Each August organizations including the Envision Foundation underscore the need for screenings and examinations to promote early detection, intervention and prevention of vision problems in children.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Vision disorders in children cost Americans more than $5.7 billion in direct and indirect expenses each year, while the overall cost of vision problems nationwide soars to an estimated $139 billion (includes long-term care, productivity loss and medical bills), according to Prevent Blindness America. Treating eye disorders and vision loss early in life helps protect children from developing chronic, lifelong conditions that become more expensive to treat because of long-term, indirect costs that increase as populations age.

“The beginning of a new school year is an exciting time in a child’s life,” Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a statement.  “By working together with parents and educators, we hope to give all our kids a bright and healthy start!”

National Immunization Awareness Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) highlights the need to improve national immunization coverage levels throughout August. To communicate the importance of immunizations now and throughout the year, NPHIC also developed a toolkit tailored to various populations including babies and pregnant women, pre-teens and teens, young adults, and adults. The toolkit seeks to:

  • Encourage parents of young children to get recommended immunizations by age 2.
  • Help parents ensure older children, preteens and teens have received all recommended vaccines by the time they return to school.
  • Remind college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories.
  • Educate adults, including health care workers, about vaccines and boosters they may need.
  • Urge pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect newborns from diseases like whooping cough.
  • Raise awareness that the next flu season is only a few months away.

The CDC also makes a wide array of resources available for those who want to learn more about the importance of immunizations or spread the word.

Neurosurgery Outreach Awareness Month
The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is among the organizations that underscores why the beginning of the school year is a great time to educate communities about strategies to prevent sports-related head and neck injuries like concussions. AANS provides tools to help others more effectively identify symptoms of potentially serious head/neck injuries and take preventive steps to ensure safety, also offering the following tips:

  • Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials for sports 100 percent of the time.
  • Remain abreast of the latest guidelines and rules governing sports with a high prevalence of head injuries including cheerleading, volleyball, and soccer.

“Concussion awareness, understanding the symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” AANS Public Relations Committee chair Kevin Lillehei, MD, FAANS, said in a statement. “Educating the public is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries. That is why it’s so important to raise awareness in the community and explain just what some of the effects are that these injuries have.”

Psoriasis Awareness Month
Sponsored by The National Psoriasis Foundation each year, Psoriasis Awareness Month is dedicated to “raise awareness, encourage research and advocate for better care for people with psoriasis.”

The most common autoimmune disease in the US affecting 7.5 million Americans, Psoriasis occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth of skin cells and produce red, scaly patches that itch and bleed. About 20,000 children under 10 are also diagnosed, often experiencing symptoms that include pitting and discoloration of the nails, severe scalp scaling, diaper dermatitis or plaques.

As part of Psoriasis Awareness Month, NPF is creating a community of “Pscientists” to “answer real‑world questions about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.”

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month
Although it’s considered a “rare disorder” with approximately 1 in 6000 babies born affected by it, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease that causes voluntary muscles to weaken and in some cases can lead to death, according to the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Types I, II and III belong to a group of hereditary diseases that weaken the voluntary muscles in the arms and legs of infants and children, contributing to breathing issues, difficulty eating and drinking, impaired mobility and orthopedic complications.

Families of SMA, which has coordinated activities around SMA Awareness Month since 1996, and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), are two national organizations that support those living with SMA. Click here to learn about events this month, community networks and research projects for treatment and therapies.

What activities are taking place in your community to support one or more of these awareness days? What could the institutions in your neighborhood, workplace or at your school be doing year-round to more effectively engage populations about critical health issues?

Categories: Access to Care