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Tag Archives: copay

“Not Being Able to Afford Medication for Our Child is Devastating”

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.


Did You Know?

Thanks to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund, more than 400 children suffering from 90 life-altering conditions have been able to access critical medical treatments.


Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services, prescription drug copays and other out-of-pocket costs. This week, we’d like you to meet Alejandro, who was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis when he was six weeks old.

In the following letter, Alejandro’s parents, Ruben and Thelma, share the challenges of affording care for their child and the big difference that HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund grant made in their lives.

Aljeandro

Aljeandro

“Our son, Alejandro, was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) when he was six weeks old. This was a time with many mixed emotions for our family. Alejandro is a twin and we were thrilled to welcome two new babies into our family. Along with our excitement, there were many sad times because we were scared of the unknown: CF and our biggest fear as parents came true with his diagnosis. He has a chronic illness that can be managed, somewhat, but has no cure. 

CF is a disease that requires Alejandro to take many medications and breathing treatments. As part of his treatment, his doctors prescribed medication during the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season. Alejandro was prescribed one shot per month for a total of five shots; one for each month from November through March. Our out-of-pocket cost is $750 [$150 per shot], which is a huge financial burden. We applied to the HealthWell Foundation for financial assistance in order to be able to pay the copayment for Alejandro’s treatment. We also contacted the manufacturer of the drug. Unfortunately, having CF does not make you eligible to receive financial support. Having a child with a chronic illness has placed a lot of stress on our family, especially on my husband and me. 

Not being able to afford medication for our child is devastating and extremely frustrating for us as parents. This is why we are so thankful for the Pediatric Assistance Fund through the HealthWell Foundation. Without a grant, we would not have been able to afford this extremely important medication for Alejandro. Receiving help was heartwarming to us because, although the contributors to the Pediatric Assistance Fund do not know our son, they were willing to donate money to ensure a child who is in need of medication receives it. On behalf of Alejandro and our family, we would like to thank all of those kind people who donate their hard earned money for children like Alejandro who need extras in order to live.”

Ruben & Thelma (Alejandro’s parents)

Companies: An average Pediatric Assistance Fund grant is $2,500. With your corporate donation, you can help children like Alejandro afford the medical treatments they desperately need. Donate today to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund.

“I Don’t Know What I Would Have Done without HealthWell”

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.


Did You Know?

100 percent of donations to HealthWell go directly to patient grants and services.


Sophie

Sophie

Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services, prescription drug copays and other out-of-pocket costs. This week, we’d like you to meet the Ambassador of the Pediatric Assistance Fund, Sophie.

Sophie suffers from a chronic illness affecting millions of Americans: asthma. In her own words, Sophie describes what it’s like to live with asthma and how HealthWell helped her family afford the medication she needs.

“Finding HealthWell was like a breath of fresh air,” says Pat, Sophie’s father.

Sophie is one of 14 million children in the United States whose family is underinsured. You can help kids like Sophie afford the medical treatments they desperately need by donating your tax deductible gift to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund. Donate today. Watch Sophie’s story.

Sophie TY

 

How HealthWell Foundation’s MS Fund Helped Charlie Get His Life Back on Track

Editor’s Note: Real World Healthcare will be taking a brief hiatus during the month of August. During this time, we’d like to share with you some of the compelling stories we’ve published about patients facing both medical and financial hardships.:

Charlie Barron

Charlie Barron

Charlie Barron was raised to set goals, make plans, get things done. But setting and meeting goals has become exceptionally hard since Charlie, 46, discovered he has multiple sclerosis.

Because of his MS, Charlie is unable to work and therefore struggles to pay for the expensive treatments he has needed since he was diagnosed in 2010, a decade after his symptoms first appeared. He received HealthWell Foundation grants in 2014 and 2015.

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A Note from Our Sponsor: Are you, or is someone you love, an MS patient on Medicare in Need of Financial Assistance? Click here to visit the HealthWell Foundation’s eligibility page.

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Before his diagnosis, this resident of DeKalb, Ga., had a career as a chef. On the job, he often stood 12-14 hours a day, despite a pins- and-needles sensation in his feet and numbness in his legs that went on for years. For a long time, he considered his physically demanding work the cause of his pain, yet his employer provided no health insurance.

Later, Charlie combined his cooking skills with his interest in fitness to open his own business.  As a personal trainer, he led clients in morning workouts in their homes, then cooked them a healthy breakfast in their kitchens. At that point, he bought himself health insurance.

However, his insurance policies have been unreliable in covering his medications. For instance, his first medication was covered, but when it proved ineffective for him, his insurance company declined to pay for the next prescribed treatment. Moving from private insurance, he obtained Medicare coverage through disability and thought those challenges would change. Recently his doctor recommended adding a second drug to Charlie’s treatment plan which has staved off relapses for the last two years, but the out-of-pocket expense was still unmanageable.

In a note thanking the Foundation for its financial assistance, Charlie described how he felt when he found out the cost of his care.  “Even though I was ready to physically fight to get my life back from MS, my finances were not so ready for battle,” he wrote. “I learned that the medication my doctor prescribed would cost upwards of $1,100 per month. I felt that I had been knocked down before I even had a chance to throw the first punch.”

“The HealthWell Foundation has given me the peace of mind to focus my energy on fighting MS and encouraging others to do the same,” Charlie’s letter said.  He continues learning about MS at a local MS center, takes physical therapy and has participated in activities such as a painting class with others coping with MS.

Social media connects him with additional people with the illness. Hearing about others’ experiences with MS, giving them encouragement or simply offering a kind word to lift their spirits gives Charlie strength.

Benefiting from the supportive care of his wife, brother-in-law and 13-year-old daughter, he urges other people with MS to seek support from family or a strong support group.  For caregivers, he recommends researching MS through the Internet, books or the MS Society to know what to expect.

Not comparing the present with the past is important to him as well. “It’s not about what you used to do, it’s about what you are trying to do now,” Charlie says.

Are you an MS patient like Charlie? How are you coping with the disease and its treatment costs? Let us know in the comments.

 

A New Year of Healthcare Success Stories

From all of us at RealWorldHealthcare, Happy New Year! As 2015 begins, we continue to monitor the healthcare landscape for insights and real-world examples of what’s working to improve access to healthcare, help patients manage their healthcare costs, and allow for more patient-centered care.

Linda Barlow
Linda Barlow

While our focus and goals have not changed, one thing has: new editorial management. I am proud to have been associated with RealWorldHealthcare over the past year or so as an occasional blogger. I’m even more proud to now be its new editor and look forward to continuing shining a spotlight on healthcare success stories. 

We want RealWorldHealthcare to be a valuable resource for you. To that end, we hope that you can take just a few moments to tell us what you think about the topics we are covering. What do you want to see more of? Less of? Are there topics we aren’t covering that you think we should? 

You’ll only need a few quick minutes to answer the following questions. Please also don’t hesitate to contact me at lbarlow@whitecoatstrategies.com if you have a specific story to share; we’re always looking for guest bloggers. Thanks in advance for your insight.

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Thank you!

This Holiday Season, Give Emergency Relief to Cancer Patients

ECRF_Facebook_wig_boost“You have cancer.”

Those devastating words send chills through us all. As the initial shock subsides the reality of unanticipated expense deals a second, unwelcome blow.

We know from assisting more than 70,000 cancer patients with the cost of their treatments just how financially overwhelming and destructive a cancer diagnosis can be. Cancer Doesn’t Care that a patient can’t afford their pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center.  Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care, but we do.

That’s why during this season of giving, we are proud to announce the launch of our “Cancer Doesn’t Care” giving campaign to raise the remaining funds needed to launch the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). The ECRF will allow us to provide immediate grants to qualified cancer patients to assist them with meaningful comforts, such as anti-nausea medicine, travel to and from an appointment, wigs and other hidden expenses.  Giving is as easy as clicking here.

The out-of-pocket critical costs of cancer can be financially devastating. According to a Duke University Medical Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute study, out-of-pocket, cancer-related costs averaged $712 a month. Further, the study found that about 30 percent of respondents said their expenses were a “significant burden” and 11 percent called those expenses a “catastrophic problem.”

The “Cancer Doesn’t Care” campaign asks individuals, celebrities, and corporations for financial and social media support. We’ve created powerful social media graphics and messaging that can be shared to highlight the many ways that cancer affects patients financially.

Cancer patients must pay for so much more than treatment, and every little bit makes a difference. Please help make the holidays a little brighter by donating, and reach out to friends and family through your own social media networks. Share the messages we’ve prepared or create your own.  Even a small donation can make a difference.

Please help ease the burden for someone who has received these three devastating words by asking your social networks to give. On behalf of HealthWell and the thousands of cancer patients we serve, I thank you for caring.

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The HealthWell Foundation is an independent non-profit that provides financial assistance to underinsured Americans to help them afford life-changing medical treatments (and sponsor of this blog).

 

Patient of the Month: Charles Fazio’s recovery from heart bypass surgery, kidney failure, and financial crisis

Patient of the Month is a new regular feature from Real World Health Care to illustrate the challenges and successes of the American health care system through the experiences of inspiring survivors.

Charles Fazio wasn’t sure how he could survive another health crisis.

Charles Fazio

Charles Fazio

Just three years after his four-way heart bypass surgery, he developed end stage kidney failure. In the worsening economy, he had lost his job as a traffic signal technician in Norfolk, Virginia and had since become too sick to work. On top of his serious health problems, Charles’ financial worries were overwhelming.

“It was like after having all of these other things happen, now I have to deal with this, too,” said Charles. “It was a big shock.”

Charles’ disability benefits had not begun to come in and he had to sell off his possessions to afford his medical expenses. Eventually, he lost his home and found himself homeless for several days.

“One night I stayed in my mom’s nursing home. I went in to visit her and I pretended like I just fell asleep in the chair next to her,” Charles said.

In short, it had been a rough few years, to say the least.

Charles was treated at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital and received dialysis for a year and a half at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Medical Center. Completing the process for Medicare allowed him to afford his dialysis treatments and living expenses.

Then, one day in 2012, Charles’ regular doctor appointment morphed into an overnight kidney transplant. “I was scared to death,” Charles said. “I didn’t know what to expect. I had read up on everything thoroughly, but when the time comes, you really just have to face it.”

By 4 o’clock the next day, he had a transplant kidney.

Charles continued treatment and testing at the VCU Medical Center after his operation. His recovery went smoothly, but he still required numerous medications and immunosuppressants. Again, he couldn’t afford the copays.

That’s when doctors and social workers introduced Charles to the HealthWell Foundation, a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog).. Charles was given a grant that enabled him to afford his medications.

“The grant I got from [HealthWell] took a lot of worry off of my back, a lot of tension,” Charles said.

With his financial stress reduced, Charles was better able to emotionally cope with his condition. “The help I got from Norfolk General, the VCU and [HealthWell] was the turning point for all of my frustrations, for feeling sorry for myself,” he said.

Now, Charles is doing quite well. At a recent annual check-up with his doctors at the VCU, his blood tests came back looking good. His transplant kidney is holding up well and his medication is stable. “You never know how you’re doing, even though you’re dieting and doing what your doctors are telling you,” he said. “In the back of your mind you’re asking, ‘How am I doing?’ and only a doctor can tell you.”

“But they said I’m doing well, and I feel good too.”

Charles is optimistic that his series of unfortunate events may now be in the past. He is recovering well and doing his best to stay healthy in his eating habits and his lifestyle. “When the weather’s nice, I try to take a walk once a week, and I hold on,” he said.

One step at a time, Charles. We’re all glad you’re here.

Categories: Access to Care, General

Five Ways to Manage the Costs of Your Medicine

While a main precept of the Affordable Care Act is to expand access to health care, in some cases that improved access means more patients are being treated with medications that come with a cost. As a pharmacist, I have to be an insurance sleuth, use common sense, and teach my patients the old-fashioned methods of negotiation.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

I work in solid organ transplant, HIV, and Hepatitis C medicine. I have patients on regimes ranging from 4 to over 20 medications. For my patients, obtaining consistent, reasonably-priced medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – is vital.

1. Make sure all the medications are at one pharmacy.  It’s important to keep a clinical eye on things for drug interactions. As a bonus, the pharmacist and the patient know what costs need to be examined.

2. Seek out insurance prior authorization.  Some insurance companies require prior authorization to cover certain drugs. Your pharmacist can help you seek prior authorization for medications that require it using software that creates forms specific to each insurance company. Ask if your pharmacist can fill out the form as much as possible before sending it to your doctor.

3. Contact the drug company.  Many pharmaceutical companies offer patient assistance programs or co-pay assistance cards to help eligible patients obtain free medicines, particularly for biologics and expensive drugs. These programs are especially helpful for patients who have insurance gaps and need the medications quickly. Depending on the assistance from a case manager or care coordinator, I have received authorization for medications right away or within 72 hours.

4. Search for a co-pay assistance program that covers your condition.  If your drug company does not offer a patient assistance program or you are not eligible based on your income and insurance coverage, it is possible that a charitable patient assistance program through a non-profit organization such as the HealthWell Foundation may be able to help you.

5. Seek discounts for over-the-counter medications.  Over-the-counter medications can put a strain on the wallet. In many cases, purchasing over-the-counter medications is more expensive than prescription medications covered by insurance. Other items like vitamins, natural supplements, and enteral formulas (also known as ‘milks’) require the patient to do a little negotiating. If you tell the pharmacy or vitamin store you will be taking these items indefinitely, they may be inclined to discount. Also, be on the lookout for buy one get one deals (BOGOs). Finally, enteral formulas can be quite expensive, so if you get prescribed a specially formulated one, ask if you can take a more basic formulation instead. Remember to let your prescriber and pharmacist know which over-the-counter medications and supplements you are using.

In conclusion, while the path to affordable medications is not always easy, there are individuals, programs, and strategies that can help you meet your health care goals.

How do you manage your medications? Share your tips in the comments section.

Categories: General

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

If you would like to suggest a topic, contribute a guest post, or learn more about short-term co-sponsorship opportunities, please contact us at dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com. As a blog currently sponsored solely by the HealthWell Foundation, an independent non-profit providing nationwide financial assistance to insured Americans with high out-of-pocket medication expenses, co-sponsorship helps us keep Real World Health Care alive and well as a resource for journalists, health care professionals, policymakers, and patients. Plus, co-sponsorship will increase your organization’s visibility among thought leaders in the health care sphere.

Do you have a favorite Real World Health Care post? Is there something you’d like to see more of? Post to the comments section or tweet at us at @RWHCblog.

Live Updates from 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Programs

Because this blog is all about increasing access, lowering costs, and improving patient outcomes, we think there’s no better place for us to share ideas that work than to report live from the 15th Annual Patient Assistance & Access Program, in Baltimore, March 5-7.  Check back often as we publish updates from sessions, and follow all of the developments by following #PAP2014.

UPDATE 9:45  Resources for navigators: www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org; patient advocacy groups such as AIDS Institute are publishing helpful sites.  Also marketplace.comment@cms.hhs.gov is a place you can send questions. This is monitored 24/7 with staff – not interns – but people who really know how to help.  These are triaged and go up to leadership when there are problems or trends.

UPDATE 9:40 Lessons learned:

  1. Partner’s are critical to success of ACA implementation; reach out early, often because plan selection often isn’t a one step process.  Patients need to come back many times before ready to sign up.  Very real “huge” health literacy gaps.
  2. Things to come: we are in closing days of enrollment.  March Madness may be a great opportunity for outreach; then we’ll reach out to those most in need; final week will be “here we are.”  So theme weeks continue.   After window closes Mar 31, you’ll soon start seeing promotion of the new window.

UPDATE 9:25 25 states and DC have indicated they will expand Medicaid.  About 85% of Americans already have minimum essential coverage.

UPDATE: 9:15 Health care law saved $8.9 M in drug costs for Medicare, said Janet Miller, Division of Strategic Partners, Office of Communications, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  2014 changes: no discrimination due to pre-existing conditions, annual limits on insurance coverage eliminated, small business tax credit increased; more people are eligible for Medicaid in some states.

Essential benefits include at least 10 general categories such as emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, mental health and substance abuse, lab services, preventive and wellness  services and chronic disease management.

Categories: Access to Care

What’s Getting Lost in the Health Care Debate?

Health care has never been more highly politicized than today.

Last year, it was central to the third longest government shutdown in U.S. history. This week, it consumed a large chunk of President Obama’s State of the Union address. Every day, we are inundated by news of health exchange website defects, insurance policy cancellations, coverage that forces people to switch doctors, and a laundry list of other problems attributed to the Affordable Care Act. On the flip side, advocates complain of the problems that make the U.S. rank among the lowest in health system efficiency among advanced economies and hail the health care law as a ray of hope.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Meanwhile, a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that one in four American families struggled to pay medical bills in 2012. Pretty dismal.

But there’s something missing from this barrage of coverage. Incredible advances are being made in health care every day, providing Americans with innovative ways to stay healthy, treat illnesses when they arise, and save money on medical problems. Just this month, a new program was launched to help people on Medicare living with multiple sclerosis afford copays for treatment; the FDA for the first time approved a postnatal test that can help parents identify possible causes of their child’s developmental delay or intellectual disability; and a study published in the Lancet showed that it is possible to train children’s immune systems to become less sensitive to peanuts.

At Real World Health Care, we focus on what is working.

That’s why I am proud to take over this week as editor of Real World Health Care. While much of my professional focus has been on health internationally – advocating for the development of vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, policies that save mothers and infants from dying during childbirth, and the formation of emergency medical systems in places where people have nowhere to turn – I am compelled by the notion that more attention must be focused on solutions that are improving U.S. patient care today. By serving as a central clearinghouse for information about improvements to segments of the U.S. health care system, we hope that our readers and those journalists who get ideas from our blog will be inspired to expand innovations that are working in health care today.

Real World Health Care – only entering its 11th month – already has a reputation for covering solutions to enhance nutrition, prevent diseases, reform medical education, improve hospitals, support patients, fund research, increase treatment adherence, and reduce costs. The blog serves as a resource for policy makers, health systems, research universities, non-profit health organizations, leading biopharmaceutical companies, government agencies, and the nation’s leading health journalists among thousands of others interested in practical and well-researched health care success stories.

We need your help to continue to grow our success. Have an idea for a story or a guest blog? Email me at jrosen@WHITECOATstrategies.com. Want to take part in advancing solutions in health care? Sign up for updates and share stories that inspire you via Twitter at https://twitter.com/RWHCblog. Do you believe in our mission to expedite improvements to our health care system? Consider co-sponsoring the blog while gaining visibility for your organization. We are now followed by over 300 health industry leaders each week, and journalists turn to us for story ideas about the good news on what’s working in our health care system. For more information, email dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com.

I look forward to continuing to cut through the political vitriol around health care with inspiring stories of what is keeping Americans healthy and saving lives. Thank you for giving meaning to our work by using this blog as a resource for yours.

Categories: General