Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: copay assistance

Focusing on Recovery, Not Financial Burdens

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.


Did You Know?

HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund is the first of its kind. It was opened in response to families who had nowhere else to turn.


Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services, prescription drug copays and other out-of-pocket costs. This week, we’d like you to meet Anna, who was born with a rare disorder affecting the brain.

In the following letter, Anna’s mom Mary, from Delta, Pennsylvania, shares the challenges of affording care for their little girl and the big difference that HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund grant made in their lives.

Anna, after surgery, healing & growing

Anna, after surgery, healing & growing

Our daughter, Anna was born with a birthmark on her face and scalp. The doctors suspected there was more to the story. A CT scan of her head confirmed the diagnosis of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, a rare disorder affecting the brain. We spent the next few weeks as new parents trying to understand our beautiful little girl and the rare disease she had. When she was just 3 weeks old, she had her first set of seizures. It was terrifying to see her little body so out of control. She was admitted to the hospital and started on medication. The doctors were able to control the seizures, but never for too long.

Since that first seizure many years ago, we have celebrated many days without seizures and suffered through the days when they eventually returned. We changed medications, avoided activity that might over fatigue her, struggled through specialized diets and prayed for a cure. Eventually, Anna was scheduled to undergo a radical surgery to remove the diseased half of her brain. We knew this could offer her a future without seizures, but we also knew the incredible cost we faced.

With the help of the HealthWell Foundation, Anna had her surgery. She is back home, seizure free – healing and growing. Our family has been able to focus our attention on Anna’s recovery knowing the financial burden has been reduced.

We are so grateful for the financial support the HealthWell Foundation has offered to us. With their help, we are able to celebrate the wonderful little girl God has blessed us with and we look forward to her bright future.

Help kids like Anna get the medical treatments they desperately need. Ask your employer today about how your donation to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund can go farther with a matching gift program. Donate today.

“I Don’t Know What I Would Have Done without HealthWell”

During the month of August, Real World Health Care will take a short break from focusing on medical breakthroughs and the researchers who are shaping the future of medicine. We will instead bring you a special series from our sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation, about what happens when families cannot afford the medical treatments their children desperately need. The families we will profile have turned to the Foundation for help, through the HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund®, the only fund of its kind.


Did You Know?

100 percent of donations to HealthWell go directly to patient grants and services.


Sophie

Sophie

Since its launch in 2013, HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund has awarded more than $850,000 in grants to help more than 400 children start or continue critical treatments covering more than 90 disease areas and conditions, including ADHD, autism, cerebral palsy, Type 1 Diabetes, epilepsy, scoliosis, seizure disorder and many more. The Fund covers family cost-shares for surgical procedures, medical devices, counseling services, prescription drug copays and other out-of-pocket costs. This week, we’d like you to meet the Ambassador of the Pediatric Assistance Fund, Sophie.

Sophie suffers from a chronic illness affecting millions of Americans: asthma. In her own words, Sophie describes what it’s like to live with asthma and how HealthWell helped her family afford the medication she needs.

“Finding HealthWell was like a breath of fresh air,” says Pat, Sophie’s father.

Sophie is one of 14 million children in the United States whose family is underinsured. You can help kids like Sophie afford the medical treatments they desperately need by donating your tax deductible gift to HealthWell’s Pediatric Assistance Fund. Donate today. Watch Sophie’s story.

Sophie TY

 

Most Americans Say They Can Afford Drugs but the Sick Still Struggle

According to an August Kaiser Health Tracking Poll, it appears that most Americans (72%) can afford their prescription drugs. However, one in four Americans surveyed indicate difficulties, including more than four in ten people who are sick. Others facing difficulties paying for their prescription drugs include those with low incomes (33%) or those taking four or more prescription drugs (38%).

KFFPollAmong those with insurance, prescription drug costs rank among a number of other health expenses, with 11 percent saying their prescription drug costs is their most burdensome health care cost, while 17 percent say it is the deductible, 14 percent say it’s their health insurance premiums, and 44 percent say that paying for health care and health insurance is not a financial burden. For those with lower incomes, paying for prescription drugs tops the list, with 17 percent reporting it is their greatest financial burden when it comes to health care costs.

Most of Americans (62%) surveyed in the poll say that prescription drugs developed in the past 20 years have made lives of people in the U.S. much better, including 42 percent who say a lot better. Do you agree? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section.

Categories: Cost-Savings, General

Rebounding from the Impact of Multiple Sclerosis: The Champlin Family’s Story

Editor’s Note: Real World Healthcare will be taking a brief hiatus during the month of August. During this time, we’d like to share with you some of the compelling stories we’ve published about patients facing both medical and financial hardships.

 

Life has not been the same for Dee Champlin, her husband Mark and their two sons since Dee was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2008. The disease has imperiled Dee’s vision, severely limited her walking and weakened her memory and speech. But she and her family have always found ways to bounce back.

Dee Champlin, receiving treatment for MS

Dee Champlin, receiving treatment for MS

Symptoms such as sensitivity to hot weather, temporary numbness and joint pain had been growing more and more common for Dee beginning in 1988.  But, as with many MS patients, it was eye problems that ultimately led doctors to the MS diagnosis 20 years after her symptoms first appeared.

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A Message from our Sponsor: Are you, or is someone you love, an MS patient on Medicare in Need of Financial Assistance? Click here to visit the HealthWell Foundation’s eligibility page.

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In one crisis, Dee suddenly began slurring her speech and drooling. Hours later, vision in her left eye started disappearing under what she described as a dark veil. A series of three ophthalmologists assessed the problem before determining she had bleeding inside the eye. This led to MS testing. Four tests, including an MRI and a spinal tap, all came back positive for MS, revealing 14 lesions on her brain at the time.

Mark describes a moment during one of Dee’s hospitalizations when he shifted from a negative attitude to a positive one that still guides the family.

Their challenges had hit him “like a punch to the gut,” he said. “Why us?” he thought. “Everything changed so fast. But then I thought, eventually we are going to get out of this hospital and go home. Things could be so much worse. With all the bad things that are happening to Dee, I don’t want to deal with my own negative attitude.”

That outlook has allowed the Champlins to absorb many changes in their lives as they cope with Dee’s health. Mark had been a self-employed truck driver but sold his semi and changed jobs to be near home after Dee had two health emergencies while he was on the road.

The couple moved from Nebraska to Lockport, N.Y., outside Buffalo, to live closer to their family for more support. Mark began working an overnight shift so he would be available to accompany Dee to medical appointments during the day.

They have both learned that MS produces good days and bad days. And on any given day, they know their plans may change, as Dee’s physical condition may vacillate from morning to afternoon.

Their sons, ages 7 and 2 when Dee’s illness was finally diagnosed, have adapted too. They pitch in at home, help out with laundry and even endure a dreaded chore — washing dishes — when their mom needs it. Their parents are attentive to addressing the boys’ concerns about Dee. They speak openly with them, but still encourage their kids to truly be kids with as normal a life as possible.

The Champlins’ latest rebound was receiving a HealthWell grant that allowed Dee to resume treatment with the only MS medication that has ever made a difference for her. Earlier, after two years of this treatment with daily injections, she received a letter from her insurance provider saying her drug costs had already exceeded the plan’s lifetime maximum. The letter concluded with this line: The cost outweighs the benefits.  “I’ll never forget that as long as I live,” Mark said.

Despite the complex and intensive medical care Dee has been through, the family takes comfort in knowing that Dee’s form of MS is not fatal and that they can continue fighting it. Returning to a previously effective drug should give Dee a better quality of life.

“So many find out they have a disease that gives them literally weeks or months to live,” Mark said. “They don’t get the ‘opportunity’ to push their loved one around in a wheelchair for the next 30 years. Luckily, I do!”

 

Categories: Cost-Savings, General

A Tale of Two Liver Transplants: Altruistic Compassion for a Compassionate Altruist

Editor’s Note: Real World Healthcare will be taking a brief hiatus during the month of August. During this time, we’d like to share with you some of the compelling stories we’ve published about patients facing both medical and financial hardships.

 

“Talk about your life changing in an instant,” Helen said, remembering her first diagnosis of acute liver failure. The doctor told her family there was nothing more to be done, and she was given two weeks to live.

Helen Bozzo

Helen Bozzo

Helen Bozzo had spent most of her time being a mother. Her husband, a farmer, worked long hours in the fields in their rural California farm, and early on in their marriage the couple decided that she would stay home to care for their three children. She was the “homeroom mother,” volunteering in classes and with the school’s administration, PTA and athletics department. Helen’s passion was helping others, and not just in the school.

Eventually moving into the town, Helen enjoyed taking others into her home – her children’s friends, her son’s comrades from the Marine Corps – she always had a full house and enjoyed taking these friends in like her family.

“I enjoyed cooking for everyone, reading, knitting and gardening,” she said. “Still things I enjoy doing today, but loving and helping people is my number one pleasure in life.”

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A Note from Our Sponsor: Are you, or is someone you love, an MS patient on Medicare in Need of Financial Assistance? Click here to visit the HealthWell Foundation’s eligibility page.

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Helen had returned from what she remembers as a great family vacation to Disneyland when she began to get ill quickly. Her doctor had her admitted to her local hospital where, after receiving tests and specialists’ opinions, she was given that shocking diagnosis.

But her family could not accept that. They sought a second opinion, and got Helen an appointment at a local cancer center. Here she was evaluated and admitted to the hospital, where she spent a month undergoing “every test known to man” and waiting desperately for an answer. All that was clear was that her liver and now her kidneys were failing. She was placed on dialysis.

“I was going downhill fast,” Helen recalls.

After much deliberation, Helen’s doctors decided to put her on the transplant list. Eight days later, on April 29, 2007, a suitable liver was available and she had the transplant. Her health began to improve immediately.

More than a third of people on the transplant list die each year waiting for an organ, according to Helen. She would later come to realize just how lucky she was, saying, “The odds of finding a match in such an acute critical case as mine are astronomical,” she said. “The doctors told me later that I was within hours of death.”

For the time being, Helen was in the clear. She had great insurance and her payment plan kept her bills covered. Though she was in debt, she was able to keep her medications coming. Considering how hard her recovery was, that was a very good thing. It took Helen a year to be able to walk again, but she eventually made a full recovery.

For the next four years, things went well for Helen. She became active again, and that meant re-embracing her spirit of altruism. She became active in the organ donor/recipient community, particularly in a liver transplant support group in which she helps others through the process of getting a transplant. She became a California Donate Life Ambassador, speaking at various organizations about the importance of becoming an organ donor. What energy Helen had, she gave to others.

Shortly before her third walk with the American Liver Foundation’s “Walk for Life,” Helen decided she had to see her doctor. She had started feeling tired after a recent road trip with a friend, and now she was feeling worse. To her dismay, the doctor’s test showed some major problems. After ten days of testing in the hospital, her liver was failing again. She was placed on the “Status 1” list in five states, the top of the transplant list.

“It was life or certain death,” Helen said.

Three days later, on September 26, 2011, Helen had her second liver transplant.

Along with this transplant, however, came three expensive new medications that her insurance would not cover. Charging thousands of dollars to her credit card every month, Helen was becoming massively over-extended. She called every agency she could, but no one could help her until she found the HealthWell Foundation. HealthWell is a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog). Helen qualified for a grant that helped cover her copays for her medications.

Now, Helen and her husband are back on their feet. As always, Helen turned her attention to paying it forward to others as soon as she could, donating to the HealthWell Foundation, continuing to support transplant recipients and raising over $25,000 in her walks for research and awareness of liver disease and failure. She spends time with her ever-growing family and her husband, with whom she just celebrated 40 years of marriage. When she’s not helping others or enjoying the love of her family, she still likes to knit, garden and cook, and hopes to see all 50 states one day.

“We are so very thankful to the HealthWell Foundation,” Helen said. “I know of families in our transplant support group that have lost their homes because they were in the same situation we were in. Thankfully we found the HealthWell Foundation in time. The home we had worked so hard for, we were able to keep. The peace of mind in knowing that every month when I went to the pharmacy I would have the money to pay for my medications meant everything to our family. The stress was gone and I could focus on my recovery in peace.”

We at RealWorldHealthCare are thrilled to see patients like Helen in such good places, doing such wonderful things. Please share your thoughts in the comment section.