Real World Health Care Blog

Tag Archives: Anxiety

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Teens and Young Adults with Cancer

This week, Real World Health Care focuses on the special behavioral health issues that can impact teens and young adults with cancer. We are delighted to share information on this topic from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and to feature insights from Tammy A. Schuler, PhD, a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Director of Outreach and Partnerships for ABCT.

ABCT is a multidisciplinary organization committed to the enhancement of health and well-being by advancing the scientific understanding, assessment, prevention, and treatment of human problems through the global application of behavioral, cognitive and biological evidence-based principles. It seeks to decrease human suffering using science.

Supporting the Cancer Community

Real World Health Care: How does ABCT address the special needs of adolescents and young adults with cancer?

Tammy Schuler

Tammy Schuler, PhD, Director of Outreach and Partnerships, Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies

Tammy Schuler: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) and their families coping with cancer have a lot to deal with. The AYAs are dealing with a major, life-changing circumstance during a period of their life when they are also dealing with other huge changes and developmental milestones. ABCT provides a variety of information to this patient community on treatment for depression, anxiety, sleep, insomnia and other areas that AYAs may struggle with. We also offer a clinical directory in which people looking for cognitive behavioral treatment can find providers in their area. Some of these providers specialize in working with people and their families who are coping with cancer, and some of them specialize in working with young people coping with a range of concerns.

Reaching Out for Help

RWHC: What advice would you give an AYA or family member who may feel uncomfortable or unsure about reaching out to a cognitive behavior therapist for help?

TS: Normalizing it is important. Many AYAs dealing with cancer experience some sort of cancer-related behavioral health issue. Issues may not happen right away. They may come up at some point during treatment or when they’re recovering from cancer treatment and trying to get back to their lives, and even beyond. In fact, a lot of AYAs report that they experience struggles after cancer treatment is over.

It’s also normal for family members – especially caregivers – to experience a behavioral health concern, at any point after the AYA’s cancer diagnosis.

Behavioral health concerns can range from having more difficulty adjusting to or coping with the cancer than one might expect, to ongoing feelings of sadness, anxiety, worry, panic attacks, persistent insomnia, increased substance use, and other symptoms. If a distressing behavioral health symptom sets in and doesn’t let up, if a behavioral health symptom becomes really disruptive to day-to-day life, or if a person starts worrying that they might hurt or kill themselves, those are signs to reach out to a qualified therapist for help.

It’s perfectly okay to reach out to people who can help, including cognitive behavior therapists, no matter what. Cognitive behavioral therapists are used to working with people dealing with these kinds of concerns; and the sooner someone reaches out, the sooner a plan can be developed to help the person feel better. Be sure to carefully check the credentials of the therapist. They should be licensed to practice in the patient’s state and should be listed as members of professional organizations, such as ABCT or the American Psychological Association.

HealthWell’s Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund is a wonderful initiative for insured people who want to reach out to a cognitive behavioral therapist, but who are struggling with finances.

Fast Facts: Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

The following information has been excerpted from the full ABCT fact sheet, written by Glynnis McDonnell, Doctoral Candidate in Clinical Psychology at St. John’s University and a Psychology Intern with the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center & St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

A cancer diagnosis can be upsetting for individuals of any age; however, the effects of a cancer diagnosis and treatment may be especially upsetting for people diagnosed as adolescents and young adults (AYAs). This period involves rapid physical and psychosocial development, and a cancer diagnosis can interrupt these developmental processes:

  • Treatment often leads AYAs to take a large amount of time off from school or work, affecting career and education plans.
  • Treatment can make the formation of romantic relationships difficult due to factors such as body image concerns, limitations placed on one’s activities, etc.
  • Treatment can lead to infertility, interfering with the ability to start biological families.
  • A potentially life-threatening illness can be especially startling for AYAs:
    • AYAs likely have a better understanding of the seriousness of their illness than child patients but are often unprepared to process the meaning of a serious disease as effectively as older patients.
    • AYAs are still in the process of developing a stable sense of self. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment of a serious illness during this period could have a different psychological impact than it does for older adults.

There is growing evidence that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for many of the psychological difficulties faced by AYAs. CBT is a form of psychotherapy that draws upon the connections among one’s thoughts, behaviors and emotions. It cannot change the fact that this young person has had to cope with a difficult diagnosis, but it can help ease the related difficult feelings, including worry, sadness and guilt related to the cancer experience. It can also help the AYA process traumatic aspects of the cancer experience.

A Message from Our Sponsor

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), patients with some forms of cancer incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are now accepting applications for our recently launched Cancer-Related Behavioral Health (CRBH) Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund provides financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical counselors, and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about our CRBH Fund and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

 

Can Psychosocial Care Increase the Value of Cancer Care?

This week, Real World Health Care interviews Suzanne M. Miller, PhD, Professor of Cancer Prevention and Control and Director of Patient Empowerment and Health Decision Making at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC). Dr. Miller , is on the Board of Directors of the HealthWell Foundation and the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM), and serves as Chair of the Board of Directors of the New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute. She also serves as Editor-in-Chief for SBM’s flagship journal Translation Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy and Research.

At FCCC, Dr. Miller’s work focuses on developing, evaluating and implementing psychosocial interventions that can be readily integrated in ongoing cancer care to improve outcomes for patients and their families, especially those outcomes related to patient-centered experiences of their cancer diagnosis. FCCC’s goal is to integrate understanding of the psychological response and negative psychological consequences of a cancer diagnosis with a broader medical management of the patient, and thereby achieve optimal patient-reported outcomes.

We discussed the work of SBM and explored the link between cancer and behavioral health. We also talked about behavioral health screening and the importance of integrated care.

Advocating for Psychosocial Care 

Real World Health Care: How does the Society for Behavioral Medicine address the issue of psychosocial care for cancer patients?

Dr. Suzanne Miller, Fox Chase Cancer Center

Suzanne Miller: SBM advocates for NIH research funding so members and others working in cancer have the dollars they need to discover and scale new behavioral treatments and care approaches. SBM also shares the latest cancer care research with members through our journals and annual scientific conference. This gives them the best information for planning new studies and for helping patients in their clinics.

Our flagship journal, Translational Behavioral Medicine, publishes studies showing how successful behavioral treatments can move from the lab to the clinic where they can help real patients. The journal’s February 2018 issue highlights the use of genomic information in cancer care and in screening cancer patients’ family members.

Other papers published in 2017 feature best practices for encouraging more colon cancer screening and for helping breast cancer patients cope with diagnosis and survival. This recent research by Allicock, et.al. (2017) investigated the drivers of successful implementation of a peer-support program in rural cancer patient populations. It identified possible barriers to the effectiveness of similar community-engaged programs in improving survivorship outcomes.

Several SBM members are at the forefront of successfully training providers to deliver existing empirically supported interventions to patients as well as shifting interventions to user-driven, mobile-friendly, web-based platforms to widen reach in treating anxiety and depressive disorders in cancer patients.

Link Between Cancer and Behavioral Health

RWHC: What are some of the most common behavioral health problems associated with having cancer?

SM: A cancer diagnosis brings a wealth of psychological challenges. In fact, adults living with cancer have a six-time higher risk for psychological disability than those not living with cancer. Patients and families have to deal with not only the physical stress to their lives and potential livelihoods, but also with family dynamics and changes in their sense of self and future.

Cancer patients also must make numerous decisions while they are in an extremely emotional state. They must decide what treatments to pursue, both initially and over the long term, how to cope with treatment side effects, how to deal with disability and maintain an independent identity, and how to maintain quality of life.

Depression and anxiety are common diagnoses associated with these challenges, yet, despite all of this, social or emotional support is offered in less than half of cancer patients’ care. If cancer patients have certain behavioral health conditions and they are not treated for them, it can negatively impact health outcomes by affecting their ability to make sound medical decisions, by decreasing the chances of them seeking and adhering to treatment, and by affecting their immune systems and ability to fight off cancer. Behavioral health issues can also contribute to harmful health behaviors such as smoking. Adults with depression are more likely to smoke heavily and less likely to quit smoking. Smoking is not only linked to cancer incidence but is also associated with a higher burden of side effects reported by cancer patients during treatment and in survivorship.

RWHC: Can behavioral health problems exacerbate physical or biological problems in cancer patients?

SM: Yes, in a number of ways. They interfere with rational decision-making about one’s treatment and one’s life choices. They also undermine adherence to needed regimes, especially over time. For example, after a breast cancer diagnosis, most patients undergo recommended surgery. However, following surgery, many patients are advised to go on hormonal regimes that can be toxic and difficult to endure. Depression and anxiety can undermine adherence to those regimens.

At a physiological level, healing can be delayed or impaired, making patients less likely to reenter society and more likely to experience relapse and recurrences. For example, cellular and molecular processes can be negatively influenced by untreated behavioral disorders in cancer patients, which can lead to the cancer’s progression. Importantly, this connection can also work conversely, meaning psychological treatment has been found to improve underlying biological status. A compelling example of this was shown by Thornton, et.al., (2009) who used a psychological intervention to alleviate symptoms of depression among cancer patients and reduce the presence of inflammatory markers found in the body. This is important because inflammatory markers are an indicator of the stress that is being placed on a person’s immune system. Since mental health issues are also associated with smoking and other unhealthy behaviors, behavioral health problems appear to contribute to worse health outcomes for cancer patients and survivors.

Attention and Support

RWHC: Do you think behavioral health impacts of having cancer get enough attention from the provider community?

SM: The provider community is well aware of and sympathetic to the kinds of challenges patients face. However, they often lack the time and expertise needed to sufficiently screen for depression and anxiety and related psychological issues. This serves as a barrier for provider compliance with recommendations that patients with behavioral health problems receive evidence-based psychological treatment. Further, there is a lack of available costs and infrastructure to pay for appropriate psychosocial interventions. All of this amounts to only 14% of cancer patients receiving behavioral health counseling. Therefore, we are faced with behavioral health issues like depression, which is common in cancer patients and is known to negatively influence cancer outcomes, which are not being addressed sufficiently in the current standard of care.

RWHC: Are there any stigmas attached to this from the patient’s perspective?

SM: Cancer has been the big “C” from the time people became aware of it. More than any other disease, patients fear it and suffer tremendous concerns about the social impact for them and their families when people learn that they have a cancer diagnosis. Further, cancer doesn’t go away. Survivorship and late effects last well after the initial diagnosis, even for early stage cancers. In fact, for a third of cancer patients, distress persists more than a year after their cancer diagnosis and comes in the forms of worrying about the future, feeling lonely or isolated, and financial concerns—to name a few. In addition, there is a very real insurance threat to the individual from having a so-called “pre-existing” condition such as cancer.

RWHC: Who are the best people to advocate for a cancer patient’s behavioral health? What happens when a patient doesn’t have a strong support network?

SM: I believe a well-coordinated health care team, combined with patient and community resources, is the best way to advocate for behavioral health. Each one brings a particular expertise that can speak not only to the public, but also to policy makers. At the patient level, patients need strong support from their families, peers, work, and their health care providers. Among the health care team, mental health providers are especially well-equipped to advocate for patients’ behavioral health needs. At the broader level, the system must consider psychosocial intervention as integral to patient care as a medical intervention. In fact, the two are synergistic, and we must be bold in the serving of the relevance of behavioral health in the overall health of patients diagnosed with cancer.

Behavioral Health Screening

RWHC: What sort of challenges need to be overcome to make a case for the value of psychosocial care for cancer patients?

SM: It is extremely important to show the viability of screening for cancer distress in a cost-effective manner, especially when using information technology (IT) that can help relieve the burden on the health care system. That is exactly why the National Cancer Institute is looking to fund projects that use IT to support the systematic screening and treatment of depression in cancer patients. In addition, it’s very important to show the value of psychosocial care in terms of its impact not only on psychosocial outcomes like depression and anxiety, but also on improving adherence, reducing readmission rates, improving survival rates, and reducing recurrence rates.

Value is defined as health outcomes achieved per dollar spent, so if psychosocial care can improve adherence and survival rates while also decreasing readmission and recurrence, then it can certainly be argued that psychosocial care will increase the value of health care provided.

The Whole Patient

RWHC: How can improving the integration of care and caring for the “whole patient” help to improve behavioral health among cancer patients?

SM: Cancer patients face reality-based anxiety and depression, stigma, changes in self and family identity, and a more frightening and uncertain world. When the health care system limits care to medical interventions, it not only makes the impact of those interventions less effective, but it also fails to recognize the impact of psychosocial influences on cancer prognosis and survivorship.

While some patients may find their way in psychological or social support interventions, if these interventions are not well-integrated within the context of the medical care model, they limit their impact and their validation. This means that patients will be much less likely to have access to, and to uptake, critical psychological resources that can not only improve quality of life, but the quantity of life as well. An integration of care ensures that patients get access to these resources and that no patients are lost to follow-up when it comes to behavioral health care. It provides the patient with a team of support that tackles the physical, social, and emotional challenges that come with a cancer diagnosis.

A Message from Our Sponsor

As the founding sponsor of Real World Health Care, the HealthWell Foundation is committed to helping patients get the medical treatments they need, regardless of their ability to pay. We’ve seen first-hand how financial distress can impact the health and lives of individuals and families. Cancer patients with behavioral health conditions are particularly hard hit; according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), patients with some forms of cancer incur $8,000 more per year in health care costs than cancer patients without behavioral health conditions.

In keeping with our mission, we are pleased to announce the introduction of a new Cancer-Related Behavioral Health Fund, specifically for treatment-related behavioral health issues in cancer. The Fund will provide financial assistance to individuals with a diagnosis of cancer to help with cost-shares (deductibles, coinsurances and copayments) for covered services rendered by behavioral health providers (psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical counselors, and licensed social workers).

We invite readers of Real World Health Care to learn more about this new Fund and how you can support it by visiting www.HealthWellFoundation.org.

 

 

Should clinicians replace medication with an ancient spiritual practice?

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University sifted through over 18,000 studies on a potential treatment for pain, anxiety and depression, narrowing their meta-analysis to 47 scientifically rigorous clinical trials. The results, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, revealed what many have experienced over thousands of years: while it’s not a cure-all, this treatment can help alleviate pain, anxiety and depression. The treatment? Meditation.

David Sheon

David Sheon

Meditation began as an ancient spiritual practice but is now also utilized outside of traditional settings to promote health and well-being. The study findings incorporate the effects of mindfulness meditation on over 3,500 participants who were selected to take part in either a meditation regimen or a different therapy, such as exercise. Overall, researchers found that the effect of meditation on participants was moderate and on par with that of prescription medications.

While this is a promising result on the benefits of meditation, the researchers identified a number of limitations. The study did not find any evidence of meditation affecting other health concerns such as positive mood, attention, substance use, eating habits, sleep and weight. Also, meditation did not provide any long-term therapy as compared to medication. “The benefits did attenuate over time — with the effectiveness of meditation decreasing by half, three to six months after the training classes ended,” said study leader Dr. Madhav Goyal, an assistant professor of medicine at Hopkins. “We don’t know why this occurred, but it could have been that they were practicing meditation less often.”

Still, Dr. Goyal said he is encouraged by the study’s results, specifically because of the short training periods for the participants. There may be greater potential for individuals with more instruction or experience in meditation. “Compared to other skills that we train in, the amount of training received by the participants in the trials was relatively brief,” he said. “Yet, we are seeing a small but consistent benefit for symptoms of anxiety, depression and pain. So you wonder whether we might see larger effects with more training, practice and skill.”

While the new study suggests that in some cases, meditation may be used in addition to or in lieu of prescription drugs to treat pain, anxiety and depression, it is important for patients to consult their doctors before altering any course of treatment.

At RealWorldHealthCare.org, we have been interested in meditation’s potentially positive impact on health. Last April, we posted about a recent study in which meditation halved the risk of death, heart attack and stroke in African American men.

Meditation may have economic benefits as well. According to a July 2013 Huffington Post blog, Aetna’s employee health care costs went down by 7 percent in 2012 after the company implemented a wellness program, which CEO Mark Bertolini attributes to reducing stress through meditation and yoga. In recognition of its positive health impact, some insurance companies provide benefits for meditation instruction. For example, CareFirst’s Options Discount Program offers up to 30% off fees for participating meditation instructors. In 2010, Americans spent more than $11 billion on antidepressants, according to the American Psychological Association.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the NIH offers an introduction to meditation, its uses and guidance for those who wish to practice meditating. The National Meditation Specialist Certification Board, an organization that seeks to promote meditation as a specialized field in health care, keeps a directory of meditation specialists, and there are many other such directories available online or through participating insurance providers.

In a Psychology Today article guiding those interested in mindfulness meditation, Dr. Karen Kissel Wegela emphasizes that sick or healthy, meditation can help people cope. “The sitting practice of mindfulness meditation gives us exactly this opportunity to become more present with ourselves just as we are,” she says. “This, in turn, shows us glimpses of our inherent wisdom and teaches us how to stop perpetuating the unnecessary suffering that results from trying to escape the discomfort, and even pain, we inevitably experience as a consequence of simply being alive.”

Have you ever meditated? Have you or someone you know ever meditated to treat depression, pain or anxiety? Did you find it effective?

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