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Need a Doctor? There’s about a Hundred Apps for That

Remember when the only personal device people had to monitor their health was the trusty old bathroom scale, and maybe a blood pressure cuff they could use at their local pharmacy? What a difference a decade makes.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

An explosion of personal, wearable, or otherwise easily accessible devices and apps used to track activity and fitness levels, monitor health problems, and even diagnose disease is well underway. In fact, more than 360 health and biotech (and nearly 390 fitness and sports) apps and products were exhibited at January’s International CES® in Las Vegas, including a new wave of trackers, online tools, wristbands and apps that collect your vital signs for medical purposes.

“Consumers now have more of an opportunity than ever to take control of their own health through technology,” says Kinsey Fabrizio, director, Member Engagement, Consumer Electronics Association (CEA)®. “There is a real convergence of technology in health and wellness, and with design advancements, improving tech and widespread adoption of mobile devices, consumer-centric care is now possible.”

According to Ms. Fabrizio, one of the hottest trends in personal health and fitness technology is devices that link to smartphones. One example of such a device is a fertility sensor from CES exhibitor Prima-Temp: a self-inserted, wireless temperature sensor that continuously and passively tracks a woman’s core body temperature, detecting the subtle changes that occur before ovulation, then sends an alert to her smartphone when she is most fertile. According to the company, understanding reproductive health and natural fertility signs can help couples avoid costly infertility treatments.

Another example comes from another CES exhibitor, Qardio: a wireless blood pressure monitor that offers a full year of battery life for 400 measurements versus the 80 available in typical monitors. The company claims the device—compatible with both iOS and Android—is the only wireless monitor that can track irregular heartbeats over time, providing users with warnings that they should consider contacting a doctor if the irregularity continues.

Wearable technology like fitness trackers, smart watches, and even pain relief technology also took center stage at CES. During a CES presentation, “The Potential of Wearable Technology,” CEA Director of Business Intelligence, Jack Cutts, pointed out that fitness trackers, “have made wearable tech mainstream, and that the newest generation of smart watches are more refined and are becoming the go-to wearable device.” Looking to the future, he said “other wearable technologies, such as smart fabrics and implantable devices, are still being explored.”

Ms. Fabrizio notes that healthcare technology also has become critical to aging in place, as evidenced by several exhibitors highlighting “lifelong tech” solutions that help seniors stay in touch electronically with providers, family members, emergency responders and other caregivers. One example is CES exhibitor MobileHelp, a mobile medical alert system that uses GPS medical alarm location technology to pinpoint the user’s exact location, so the closest available emergency responders are dispatched no matter where the user travels.

Some in the healthcare field—including attendees of CES’s Digital Health Conference—have raised concerns, not only about the privacy of patient data as it streams through the Internet and resides in the cloud, but also that people’s reliance on health and medical devices and apps will push the professional healthcare practitioner out of the equation. Some worry that no self-diagnosis technology can replace the in-person treatment available at a practitioner’s office, while others point to the ability of technology to increase the value and productivity of physicians.

Ms. Fabrizio adds that device and app makers are looking to help shape the future of digital health with products people can access easily. To that end, CEA, which represents 2,000 companies, formed a Health and Fitness Technology Division last year. The goal of the Division is to raise consumer awareness of how consumer electronic devices can help improve health and fitness as well as help manufacturers navigate the marketing, regulatory and myriad other challenges facing this nascent marketing segment.

“These CEA members are making products that are seamless with what people already do,” Ms. Fabrizio concludes. “They are more than fun; they provide valuable data that drives healthier behavior and preventive health benefits.”

Are consumer apps and devices for tracking health and fitness helping you improve your health? Share your opinion in the comments section.

A New Year of Healthcare Success Stories

From all of us at RealWorldHealthcare, Happy New Year! As 2015 begins, we continue to monitor the healthcare landscape for insights and real-world examples of what’s working to improve access to healthcare, help patients manage their healthcare costs, and allow for more patient-centered care.

Linda Barlow
Linda Barlow

While our focus and goals have not changed, one thing has: new editorial management. I am proud to have been associated with RealWorldHealthcare over the past year or so as an occasional blogger. I’m even more proud to now be its new editor and look forward to continuing shining a spotlight on healthcare success stories. 

We want RealWorldHealthcare to be a valuable resource for you. To that end, we hope that you can take just a few moments to tell us what you think about the topics we are covering. What do you want to see more of? Less of? Are there topics we aren’t covering that you think we should? 

You’ll only need a few quick minutes to answer the following questions. Please also don’t hesitate to contact me at lbarlow@whitecoatstrategies.com if you have a specific story to share; we’re always looking for guest bloggers. Thanks in advance for your insight.

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Thank you!

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Please Help on #GivingTuesday.

ECRFjumboCancer Doesn’t Care.

It doesn’t care that a patient can’t afford pain medication or the expense of getting to a treatment center. Cancer Doesn’t Care that some patients are forced to drain their child’s college savings fund or choose between an imaging scan and buying groceries.

Cancer Doesn’t Care. Do you?

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day where families, individuals, and businesses will come together with a common purpose: giving thanks and helping others.  #GivingTuesday is an annual opportunity to celebrate generosity and donate or volunteer for your charity of choice.  Show that you care about cancer patients by giving to HealthWell’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF).

Whether or not you can make a donation, we’d like your help to build awareness for the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. One of the easiest ways to help is to share our graphics and messaging (below) with your networks.

1. Please join me in support of @HealthWellOrg’s Emergency Cancer Relief Fund. Click here to donate today: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

2. Join us on #GivingTuesday to help #cancer patients cover critical out-of-pocket expenses. http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

3. Provide meaningful comforts to cancer patients by supporting the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund: http://bit.ly/cancerrelief #CancerRelief

With your support, we will be able to open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund to assist qualified cancer patients so they can better manage their road to recovery…when waiting another day is not an option.

We hope that you will consider helping HealthWell. Together, we can make the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund a reality. Learn how you can make a difference in the life of a cancer patient.  Join us in showing that you care by donating and reaching out to friends and family through your social network.

The Current Perspectives of Palliative Care

Last Monday, Dr. Linda Sutton gave a speech on palliative care at the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Summit on Patient Advocacy.  A subset of healthcare commonly misunderstood, palliative care is no longer just end-of-life care.

What is palliative care? How is it different from hospice?

 Dr. Sutton: There are many definitions of palliative care –CMS’ [Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services] is based on how palliative care is paid for; while the World Health Organization’s, is broad and inclusive but complicated and characterized by what palliative care is not.  The definitions that have made the most sense to me and my patients are those definitions that emphasize what palliative care does – alleviate the multi-dimensional suffering of patients with serious and chronic illnesses.Palliative Care Diagram

One way to help explain the difference between palliative care and hospice is to use a diagram:

All care provided by hospice is palliative care, but only a small proportion of all the palliative care provided is hospice care.  Hospice is largely defined by the CMS criteria for eligibility; most notably that patients have a life expectancy of 6 months or less if the disease runs its usual course.  That has largely limited the applicability of hospice. Palliative care is not constrained by how insurance companies or Medicare define the care.

 

Why does this misconception exist with palliative care? 

Early on, as palliative care emerged as a medical specialty in its own right, the effort was to distinguish palliative care from other disciplines and approaches.  Palliative care advocates spent a lot of time and energy emphasizing what palliative care was not; rather than focusing on what it was.  Some of this was driven by the negative connotation of ‘hospice.’  The unfortunate reality is that hospice care is inextricably linked to dying.  Hospice provides terrific palliative care that focuses on the patient and the family as the unit of care, but does so explicitly for those who are dying.  Palliative care advocates wanted to offer that care to others, who might not be dying, but still faced high levels of stress – both physiologic and psychosocial due to serious medical illness(es).

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How do you think we can change the perception of palliative care? 

I think the only ways to change perceptions are through education and experience.  Clearly more education of both our clinical providers and the public in general is required.  But, what will be more important, in the final analysis, is what experiences do patients and their families have with palliative care?  If good patient experiences are shared, more people will know about and seek help from palliative care specialists.  However, it will be a challenge to significantly increase patient experience over the next few years, given the shortage of clinicians skilled in palliative care.

 

Do most doctors know the benefits? Or do you need to see a specialist?

I am not convinced that most physicians yet see how palliative care specialists can help their patients.  In many locations or places of practice, there is not a palliative care specialist immediately available – the closest specialist may be hundreds of miles away.  That is important because a large proportion of the populace in need of palliative care really cannot travel to see a specialist due to the burden of their disease or illness.  One consequence of this is that, if physicians cannot see the benefits of palliative care first-hand, it is difficult to understand how their own patients might be helped.  Furthermore, much of the palliative care services that are offered are inpatient services and not available for outpatients.  With fewer doctors going to the hospital on a regular basis to see patients, they again miss the opportunity to see the benefit of palliative care services.

We may need to develop more creative ways of delivering palliative care – perhaps using telemedicine or other technologies.

 

Do all patients who need palliative care require a ‘palliative care specialist’?

This is complicated, because no two patient situations are alike.  But, I don’t think ALL patients with serious illness need palliative care but they should have access to clinical providers with training in palliative care – that might be a social worker, or nurse specifically trained to address the palliative needs of patients.  A good clinician working with others trained in palliative care –even if the clinician is not ‘board certified’ in palliative care, can alleviate significant amounts of patients’ distress.

 

If you think that you or someone you love needs palliative care, what is the first step toward getting it?

 Always, start with your physician.  Contact your local hospital, if there are palliative care specialists in your community, they are likely on staff at your local hospital.  Your local hospice might also have a palliative care specialist on staff as well or can help with locating those resources.

 

Did you know that palliative care wasn’t just end-of-life care? Would you consider it for yourself or a loved one, or is this misconception still too strong? Tell us about your views on palliative care, and if it changed, in the comments section!

If Uber can Deliver Flu Shots, Could Drones Deliver Medications?

Vanessa Merta

Vanessa Merta

Last Thursday, Uber test ran a new concept that added wellness to its mission of evolving the way the world moves. Along with making cities more accessible, Uber made health care more accessible with flu shot deliveries. Currently, we know of no other companies delivering vaccines upon request like Uber, but we do know of a few other health care delivery services in the works, and some of the more exciting services include drones.

DHL has been researching delivery of health care with drones they’re calling “parcelcopters.” While Amazon Prime Air has been working on delivering products via drone, DHL is testing the system with medications specifically. As a part of a month long test run that began in September, they have been delivering medications via unmanned aircraft from a coastal town in Germany to the small island of Juist, about seven and a half miles away. The only restriction thus far has been the inability to send medications that need to be refrigerated. DHL is still early in the product testing process, but they are hopeful that this can be a way to deliver medications to those who live in rural areas, or are unable to get to pharmacies.

While delivering mediations via drone sounds like an optimal solution that could provide quick health care to people in hard to reach places, some ethical questions arise. Could personal identifying information be at risk if these parcelcopters crash? A DHL spokeswoman says that the drones will not fly in the same altitudes as conventional aircrafts, and also avoid this possible breach of privacy by avoiding flying over homes.

Time magazine quickly refuted another common fear that drone delivery will increase air pollution, claiming that it can be greener than traditional forms of pick up and deliveries.

Time reporter Bryan Walsh says that delivery services are “a lot more efficient at delivering products to you than you are at driving out and buying them yourself,” and drones are no exception.

Following in Amazon Prime Air’s path, FedEx has been researching drone delivery, but they want to find a specific niche. They have not named their interests yet, but why not consider medication delivery? Over the summer, Google announced that they have been researching drone delivery in the Australian outback, where they successfully delivered first aid kits to rural farmers. Both companies are in the developing stage, but once finished this could be a promising new technology that improves health care accessibility.

American companies will have a more difficult time than DHL in Germany because the Federal Aviation Administration bans the use of unmanned aircrafts to deliver commercial products. Amazon says that as soon as the FAA has the proper regulations in place, it will begin delivering products via drone. Maybe after that, an American drone delivery service will claim medication delivery as their niche.

How would you feel about drones delivering your medications? Do you think these nontraditional methods of health care delivery will gain acceptance and popularity in the future? Tell us what you think in the comments section!

Categories: Access to Care

New App Makes Diabetes Care Delivery a Whole New Ballgame

A father brings his son to a baseball game. The day is nice, the weather is good, but there’s one problem: the boy has Type 1 diabetes, and they forgot his test strips. Do they leave the game for home or a pharmacy? Do they wing it, risking the boy’s health and trying to manage his blood sugar with his diet?

Nathan Sheon

Actually, they opt for the third choice: HelpAround, a mobile safety net for people with diabetes. The
man can pull out his phone, see that there is another diabetes patient two sections down, and ask for the supplies his son needs. With that, the day is saved.

A story like that is how HelpAround began. Established in 2013, HelpAround was designed to bring people with diabetes together in a common space to provide not just peer-to-peer support, but peer-to-peer care as well. Using new mobile technology, the app provides a highly personalized account of treatment needs and matches patients accordingly with other patients who have similar needs.

According to Yishai Knobel, CEO and co-founder of HelpAround, the service fills in what is otherwise a gray area of diabetes treatment. People with diabetes face a large spectrum of constant health concerns that vary widely in severity. Not having test strips, for instance, might not warrant going to the hospital, but can be very serious for patients who need to constantly monitor their health. With an app like this to fall back on, according to Knobel, people with diabetes are able to live more normal lives knowing that they can get the help they need whenever they need it. “People with chronic conditions have so much going on, on top of their everyday lives,” he said. “Creating this social safety net is really something valuable.”

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Did you know that September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month? One way to help pediatric cancer patients and their families who are faced with a devastating medical emergency is to donate to HealthWell Foundation’s Pediatric Assistance fund.  Click here to learn more and donate to help families in need.

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HelpAround also provides a less tangible but equally important factor for its patients: a sense of belonging to a community. Though he did not want to disclose numbers, Knobel said that in the early stages of the app’s launch, 85% of requests for help received a response. For people with chronic conditions, knowing that there is a dedicated support base by patients and for patients is invaluable.

“Connecting the right people at the right time in a system can create a wonderful moment of empowerment, support and comradery,” Knobel said.

With use of the app growing, patient groups for other chronic diseases have also begun to discuss using technology like this. With communication technology advancing and a growing call for more patient-centered solutions to health issues, Knobel believes that technologies like HelpAround will allow patients to manage their own health needs more efficiently.  Perhaps most important, the app helps patients stay compliant with their treatment schedule.

“We want to really give the patient a full support system, (helping them) on the go, focusing on their needs, to better manage their health care,” Knobel said.

Have you ever used HelpAround or a similar technology? What was your experience? What does this mean for the future of care-delivery and treatment compliance? Let us know in the comment section!

Categories: Access to Care, General

Patient of the Month Revisited: Sharon Harris Survives Lupus and Pays It Forward

Real World Health Care is on its summer break. During this time, we will be revisiting some of our Patients of the Month. Please enjoy these inspiring stories from the patients we serve.

Sharon Harris remembers February of 2002. She remembers where she was, what she was wearing, and what she was feeling. Most of all, she remembers the day she was diagnosed with lupus.

Sharon Harris

May is Lupus Awareness Month. Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when the body’s immune system is unable to distinguish between foreign illnesses and the body’s own tissue and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart, lungs, and other organs. Although there is no cure for lupus, there are numerous medications that can alleviate its symptoms.

Sharon had just graduated from Florida A&M University in Tallahassee when she received her diagnosis. “I was 22 at the time, fresh out of college,” Sharon said. “You’re taught while you’re growing up to learn your manners, respect your elders, and get a good education. No one tells you about an autoimmune disease that you will have for the rest of your life.”

Nor had anyone told her what having lupus would entail. “I immediately went into battle mode,” she said. “I had graduated from college. I had traveled 1200 miles from my family to make my journalism degree happen, and I was going to fight.”

“But, as soon as I got my fight on, that’s when all the pain started.”

Sharon experienced a flare-up of symptoms. It would be an understatement to say that the rest of that winter was difficult for her. Her hair began to fall out. She suffered from constant fatigue and pain. In the month of February alone, Sharon lost thirty pounds.

After beginning treatment on several different medications, Sharon started feeling better by that summer. One Wednesday during a Bible study, Sharon was asked what she would do if it were her last day on Earth.

“I said I wanted to see the world,” Sharon said. “Because if lupus was going to take me out, then it was going come and find me in Paris on the Eiffel Tower or on a beach in the Virgin Islands.”

By chance, Northwest Airlines (now Delta) had put out an ad to recruit flight attendants. It was a dream job for Sharon. The job provided her with better insurance, and on her off days she could fly to any location on Northwest’s roster. Just as she had hoped, Sharon got a chance to see the world. Amazingly, Sharon started to find that her experience with lupus was helping her have a healthier mindset. “It really made me think of life in a whole different way, and just literally live. Just really get out there and live,” she said.

Sharon eventually moved back to Tallahassee, opening an eyelash parlor and holding down an office job. At that point, she experienced another flare-up. “In October in Tallahassee it is still 100 degrees outside, and I was wearing a wool coat,” Sharon said. “I was so sick.” Sharon packed up and returned to her hometown: Detroit, MI.

Now, too sick to work and without a job, Sharon did not have health insurance. The lupus was attacking her kidneys and the medicine that she was prescribed cost upwards of $3,000 for a month’s supply. Despite pinching pennies to afford her daughter’s medication, Sharon’s mother was willing to refinance her house to save her only child’s life.

That’s when Sharon’s luck shifted. One day, she visited a local lupus organization with the intention of buying a t-shirt, and she ended up walking out with a new job. Her new public relations position did not include benefits but being employed allowed her to purchase health insurance.

Although she had insurance, her share of the payments for her four medications was unaffordable; one of the therapies alone cost more than $1,000 per month. That’s when Sharon found out about the HealthWell Foundation from a Google Alert. HealthWell is a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog).

“Literally, HealthWell saved my life,” Sharon said. “I didn’t have to incur any debt, my mother didn’t have to refinance her house, and HealthWell saved the day.”

SharronHarris2

And Sharon wanted to save the day for others like her. She has become a leading activist for lupus awareness, starting her own advocacy group called Lupus Detroit, which offers lupus patients emergency grants. Sharon points out that there are two colors that are used for lupus awareness, orange and purple. She opted for orange for her organization because the color is “louder” and garners more attention. “Lupus needs all of the attention that it can get,” Sharon said.

Sharon is currently in remission and has been doing well since receiving a grant from HealthWell in 2011 that allowed her to afford her medications. “I was inspired by the work that HealthWell does to help people with their medications,” she said. “I just don’t believe that someone should have to choose between paying for their medication and feeding their children.”

And neither do we, Sharon. Keep up the excellent work.

If you are inspired to help, consider raising awareness during Lupus Awareness Month and showing your support. Here are some suggestions:

  • Make a donation to HealthWell’s SLE Fund in honor of a family member or loved one who is battling lupus.
  • Celebrate World Lupus Day on Saturday, May 10th.
  • Put on Purple on Friday, May 16th and visit The Lupus Foundation of America’s website at www.lupus.org to learn how you can show your support.
  • Find your local Lupus Foundation of America chapter to learn about activities in your area.

Has lupus touched your life? Do you have plans to show support during Lupus Awareness Month? Share your story in the comments section.

Patient of the Month Revisited: Charles Fazio’s recovery from heart bypass surgery, kidney failure, and financial crisis

Real World Health Care is on its summer break. During this time, we will be revisiting some of our Patients of the Month. Please enjoy these inspiring stories from the patients we serve.

Charles Fazio wasn’t sure how he could survive another health crisis.

Charles Fazio

Just three years after his four-way heart bypass surgery, he developed end stage kidney failure. In the worsening economy, he had lost his job as a traffic signal technician in Norfolk, Virginia and had since become too sick to work. On top of his serious health problems, Charles’ financial worries were overwhelming.

“It was like after having all of these other things happen, now I have to deal with this, too,” said Charles. “It was a big shock.”

Charles’ disability benefits had not begun to come in and he had to sell off his possessions to afford his medical expenses. Eventually, he lost his home and found himself homeless for several days.

“One night I stayed in my mom’s nursing home. I went in to visit her and I pretended like I just fell asleep in the chair next to her,” Charles said.

In short, it had been a rough few years, to say the least.

Charles was treated at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital and received dialysis for a year and a half at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Medical Center. Completing the process for Medicare allowed him to afford his dialysis treatments and living expenses.

Then, one day in 2012, Charles’ regular doctor appointment morphed into an overnight kidney transplant. “I was scared to death,” Charles said. “I didn’t know what to expect. I had read up on everything thoroughly, but when the time comes, you really just have to face it.”

By 4 o’clock the next day, he had a transplant kidney.

Charles continued treatment and testing at the VCU Medical Center after his operation. His recovery went smoothly, but he still required numerous medications and immunosuppressants. Again, he couldn’t afford the copays.

That’s when doctors and social workers introduced Charles to the HealthWell Foundation, a nationwide non-profit providing financial assistance to insured patients who are still struggling to afford the medications they need (and sponsor of this blog).. Charles was given a grant that enabled him to afford his medications.

“The grant I got from [HealthWell] took a lot of worry off of my back, a lot of tension,” Charles said.

With his financial stress reduced, Charles was better able to emotionally cope with his condition. “The help I got from Norfolk General, the VCU and [HealthWell] was the turning point for all of my frustrations, for feeling sorry for myself,” he said.

Now, Charles is doing quite well. At a recent annual check-up with his doctors at the VCU, his blood tests came back looking good. His transplant kidney is holding up well and his medication is stable. “You never know how you’re doing, even though you’re dieting and doing what your doctors are telling you,” he said. “In the back of your mind you’re asking, ‘How am I doing?’ and only a doctor can tell you.”

“But they said I’m doing well, and I feel good too.”

Charles is optimistic that his series of unfortunate events may now be in the past. He is recovering well and doing his best to stay healthy in his eating habits and his lifestyle. “When the weather’s nice, I try to take a walk once a week, and I hold on,” he said.

One step at a time, Charles. We’re all glad you’re here.

Categories: General

Five Ways to Manage the Costs of Your Medicine

While a main precept of the Affordable Care Act is to expand access to health care, in some cases that improved access means more patients are being treated with medications that come with a cost. As a pharmacist, I have to be an insurance sleuth, use common sense, and teach my patients the old-fashioned methods of negotiation.

Joel Zive

Joel Zive

I work in solid organ transplant, HIV, and Hepatitis C medicine. I have patients on regimes ranging from 4 to over 20 medications. For my patients, obtaining consistent, reasonably-priced medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – is vital.

1. Make sure all the medications are at one pharmacy.  It’s important to keep a clinical eye on things for drug interactions. As a bonus, the pharmacist and the patient know what costs need to be examined.

2. Seek out insurance prior authorization.  Some insurance companies require prior authorization to cover certain drugs. Your pharmacist can help you seek prior authorization for medications that require it using software that creates forms specific to each insurance company. Ask if your pharmacist can fill out the form as much as possible before sending it to your doctor.

3. Contact the drug company.  Many pharmaceutical companies offer patient assistance programs or co-pay assistance cards to help eligible patients obtain free medicines, particularly for biologics and expensive drugs. These programs are especially helpful for patients who have insurance gaps and need the medications quickly. Depending on the assistance from a case manager or care coordinator, I have received authorization for medications right away or within 72 hours.

4. Search for a co-pay assistance program that covers your condition.  If your drug company does not offer a patient assistance program or you are not eligible based on your income and insurance coverage, it is possible that a charitable patient assistance program through a non-profit organization such as the HealthWell Foundation may be able to help you.

5. Seek discounts for over-the-counter medications.  Over-the-counter medications can put a strain on the wallet. In many cases, purchasing over-the-counter medications is more expensive than prescription medications covered by insurance. Other items like vitamins, natural supplements, and enteral formulas (also known as ‘milks’) require the patient to do a little negotiating. If you tell the pharmacy or vitamin store you will be taking these items indefinitely, they may be inclined to discount. Also, be on the lookout for buy one get one deals (BOGOs). Finally, enteral formulas can be quite expensive, so if you get prescribed a specially formulated one, ask if you can take a more basic formulation instead. Remember to let your prescriber and pharmacist know which over-the-counter medications and supplements you are using.

In conclusion, while the path to affordable medications is not always easy, there are individuals, programs, and strategies that can help you meet your health care goals.

How do you manage your medications? Share your tips in the comments section.

Categories: General

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

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