Author Archives: Paul DeMiglio

Profiles in Courage: Beating Breast Cancer One Story at a Time

As we recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, heroes, organizations and allies nationwide are leveraging creative strategies to empower patients and families, educate communities and mobilize supporters to overcome the disease and live healthier.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Are You Dense?

Dedicated to “informing the public about dense breast tissue and its significance for the early detection of breast cancer” Are You Dense? seeks to educate the public and raise awareness around dense breast tissue and the need for early detection through online tools and resources in addition to speaking engagements. This organization helps women diagnosed with breast cancer by highlighting what it’s like to live with the disease, advocating changes to public policy around detection and supporting new and existing research.

Athena® Warriors

From the time she was a little girl, six-time Grammy winner singer/songwriter Amy Grant knew that cancer “was a force to be reckoned with.” Amy was inspired at a young age by the work of her father – an oncologist who spent his entire medical career treating cancer – to join the band of warriors. A tireless advocate, she draws courage from the countless women she helps empower every day to fight breast cancer, along with her fellow warriors: Amanda Beard, Angela Stanford and Karen Gooding.

“I am inspired by every Athena Warrior. If my music can bring women together and make a connection, then I have contributed something. Athena water takes a terrible situation and does something good for many; that’s why I love being an Athena Warrior,” Grant said.

Terror for Ta-Tas

Woods of Terror — a haunted theme park in Greensboro, North Carolina — hosts the annual “Terror for Ta-Tas Night” to benefit breast cancer survivors. A percentage of the proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to Cone Health Cancer Center’s “Finding your New Normal” program for breast cancer survivors.

Tami Knutson, Breast Cancer Center Manager for Cone Health, is passionate about helping Terror for Ta-Tas because she believes it will empower more Americans to live healthier and bring us closer to ending breast cancer.

“I teach young women about self-breast awareness,” Knutson said. “There is not another venue that I have access to young people.  Most health fairs attract people in the middle years and older. I find teaching  in such a crazy, unexpected location very rewarding. It catches people off guard and I think my message is really heard.”

The Terror for Ta-Tas event runs from 7:30–11 p.m. Friday, October 11. For event information visit terrorfortatas.com, and to learn more about the “Finding Your New Normal” program e-mail Tami Knutson at Tami.Knutson@conehealth.com.

Tough Enough to Wear Pink

A non-profit marketing campaign sponsored by Wrangler, Tough Enough to Wear Pink (TETWP) began with breast cancer survivor Terry Wheatley who, with Wrangler, challenged cowboys and cowgirls to wear pink at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo to raise awareness and to honor the women in their lives that had been affected by the disease.  TETWP serves as a springboard for communities to create rodeos and other western events that raise awareness around breast cancer.  By focusing attention on women’s health, this initiative raises money for women’s health education, supports women’s treatment centers and much more.

“The success of the Tough Enough to Wear Pink campaign – which has raised over $14.5 million dollars since its inception in 2004 – is that every community that participates through their rodeo or their western event is encouraged to keep their money locally to do good in their own back yards through contributions to their women’s breast cancer center, the women’s breast cancer wing of the local hospital or whatever breast cancer support group is in need in their community,” Wheatley said. “It is the decision of the local rodeo committee or event on who receives their donation.  The success of the campaign is that it is truly grass-roots, with people raising $5 at a time to support someone in their community.”

For example, Red Bluff Round-Up raises money for breast cancer treatment at the St. Elizabeth Imaging Center in their community of Red Bluff, California, to provide mammograms and other women’s health services directly from the funds generated through their TETWP rodeo event. This is just one of the many examples of how individual rodeos and western events use their funds to help women live healthier lives.

Now tell us how you are touching the lives of women living with breast cancer. What are you doing in your local community, place of worship, school or workplace to spread the word about how we can stop this disease together?

Will You Be There for Stella?

When patients are diagnosed with cancer, the last thing they should have to worry about is money. That’s why the HealthWell Foundation is planning to open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund (ECRF). This Fund is something completely new and different – created specifically to help people with expenses not covered under HealthWell’s traditional copay fund structure.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

For example, HealthWell will be able to grant as little as $25 to help someone pay for anti-nausea medicine and larger grants for things such as surgical expenses and diagnostic testing that piled up during their treatment. HealthWell has provided direct financial assistance so that more than 70,000 insured people living with cancer can afford their medical treatments.

Once open, ECRF will enable HealthWell to continue helping even more cancer patients just like Stella — wife, mother and caregiver from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, who was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. As Stella describes in her letter below, HealthWell’s grant was exactly what she needed to help her afford her treatments and continue caring for her family:

Dear Friends,

The past two years have been pretty bad for my husband and me. On February 21, 2011 we lost our only daughter to Scleroderma – a devastating disease that shrunk her skin, took her bones, her kidneys, her heart and finally her life – even though she had the best medical care available in Atlanta, GA.

We didn’t think things could ever be that bad again but, in July of that year, I was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – Type B. In August, our son (and only remaining child) was diagnosed with Stage IV prostate cancer. We feared that we would lose both our children in the same year; however, he was treated very aggressively with radiation and hormones and now is in remission.

My husband turned 90 this year and has bladder cancer, prostate cancer, he just had a melanoma removed from his face and two weeks later a squamous cell carcinoma was removed from his arm. The tests showed complete removal (how thankful we are for that). So far, we have been able to keep up with the copays for everything until non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma struck me. Without your generous support the winter of 2011 and June of 2012, I could not even have begun my treatment. But the Lord is good! He led me to a great medical team who led me to you kind folks and my treatment began in October 2011. I am now scheduled for four treatments, beginning in May and another four beginning in November, after which my doctor thinks I won’t need any more for a while.

Could you possibly help me with the series of treatments? I just have to get well. My husband is 90 years old and besides the cancer in various parts of his body, he is losing his eye sight, his memory (it is bad) and his hearing. There is no one else to take care of him. I am the last living of my family and he has one sis

ter who is in worse health than he is. Please! Let me know if you can help me in any amount. I will be eternally grateful. Please forgive the length of this letter. When I began writing, it just all poured out. I have no one to talk to about this, so thanks for listening.

Stella – Baton Rouge, LA

P.S. Please accept my meager check in the amount of $25.00. I hope there will be more available in time.

Money is the Last Thing A Cancer Patient Should Have to Worry About

Patients just like Stella who had nowhere else to turn are counting on HealthWell for financial relief right now. But for ECRF to open, we must raise $50,000 and have a long way to go before we hit our goal. So far we’ve raised $20,640 but aren’t there yet. Can we count of you to help us reach out goal?

Click here to learn about ECRF, and donate whatever you can — $5, $10, $25 — so we can make life easier for more patients who are struggling to survive.

Categories: Cost-Savings

World Heart Day Underscores Why Exercise and Diet Count

This year’s World Heart Day on Sunday, September 29 will focus on raising awareness around changes that individuals – especially women and children – can incorporate into their daily habits to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Created in 2000 by the World Heart Federation (WHF) to highlight heart disease and stroke as the world’s leading causes of death claiming 17.3 million lives each year, advocates will educate the public about prevention strategies through talks and screenings, walks and runs, concerts and sporting events.

It is expected that by 2030, 23 million people will die of CVD, more than the entire population of Australia. Together with its members, WHF reports that 80 percent of premature deaths from CVD could be reduced if individuals take the following actions:

  • Reduce or discontinue use of tobacco
  • Eat healthfully
  • Engage in physical activity

CVD can affect people of all ages and population groups, including women and children, as illustrated in WHF’s infographic that also shares practical tips on how to eat more healthfully and exercise more frequently. To teach children about healthy heart living, WHF also created a leaflet along with a character, “Superheart,” that encourages:

  • Playing outdoor games
  • Cycling
  • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends increasing daily servings of mostly plant-based foods to help improve cardio health, acknowledging that “many studies have shown that vegetarians seem to have a lower risk of obesity, coronary heart disease (which causes heart attack), high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and some forms of cancer.”

To support better coronary health outcomes, AHA created five goals for healthy eating that encourage individuals to:

  • Eat more fruits and vegetables.
  • Consume more whole grain foods.
  • Use liquid vegetable oils such olive, canola, corn or safflower as your main kitchen fat.
  • Eat more chicken, fish and beans than other meats.
  • Read food labels to help you choose the healthiest option.

AHA also published an info sheet about the warning signs of a heart attack, which often starts slowly and usually goes unnoticed. This is especially true among women, whose symptoms can often mimic those of the flu. Additionally, it is common among women to put others first, especially their children, and so they usually do not recognize symptoms until it is too late. To address this public health challenge, AHA initiated the Go Red for Women campaign to empower women to know their risk, live more healthfully and share their stories.

The primary warning signs of a heart attack remain the same regardless of gender, however:

  • Chest discomfort
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or light headedness

Now tell us your story. Do you know anyone who experienced a heart attack or other heart condition? Are you aware of your own risk level? What could you, your friends or loved ones do differently to live more healthfully?

Are You Ready to Show Your Purple to Stop Alzheimer’s?

Advocates nationwide are gearing up to participate in activities around Alzheimer’s Action Day on September 21, a pre-event to World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in November. As the facts demonstrate, the need for education and action around this disease is great. A form of progressive dementia that adversely impacts memory, thinking and behavior, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and there is no cure.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

To build support and increase visibility, the Alzheimer’s Association leverages Alzheimer’s Action Day to educate the public and fund research for Alzheimer’s, urging individuals to “Go Purple to End Alzheimer’s.” The association empowers supporters to raise money for Alzheimer’s research with the following creative ideas that can be used in the workplace, at school or at home:

  • Go purple at your office or campus by encouraging your co-workers or your peers to wear purple.
  • Decorate common areas at your workplace or school with purple. Share the latest stats and trends about the disease, like the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s. Call (800) 272-3900 to request fact sheets.
  • Go “Casual for the Cause” at work. Order $5 stickers from the association that you can then sell in your office to raise funds. Download a flier here and e-mail Kaarmin Ford at kaarmin.ford@alz.org for stickers.
  • Host a dinner party at your home and ask each attendee to donate what they would have spent going out. Click here to download meal ideas that can be used at home or in the cafeteria.
  • Invite your friends to Tailgate to Tackle Alzheimer’s starting this month. Supporters who host these purple-themed tailgates can ask participants to donate $5 to help the 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s.

Over the past decade, Alzheimer’s has become an even more urgent public health crisis, demanding greater attention from both a patient care and cost-savings standpoint:

  • Five million Americans and one in three seniors live with Alzheimer’s.
  • Since 2000, the number of deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s has increased by 68 percent.
  • The disease accounts for 50-80 percent of all dementia cases.
  • Alzheimer’s will cost the nation an estimated $203 billion this year.
  • Costs are expected to increase by 500 percent by the year 2050, meaning that the annual cost will swell to $1.2 trillion.

The Alzheimer’s Association is collaborating with partners from around the country to help communities “Go Purple.” These include the Las Vegas CME – Medical and Health Education for All, the California Association of School Health Educators (CASHE) and Cox 11, a community station in Hampton Roads, VA, which are all spreading the word about ways to get involved at the local level. Ruby Tuesday will also raise awareness for Alzheimer’s Action Day at select locations, giving 20 percent of purchases to the Walk to End Alzheimer’s when customers present a flyer to their server on September 21.

“Supporting Alzheimer’s Association specifically on Alzheimer’s Action Day will help generate much needed awareness about this disease and what we can do as a community to support families with this disease on a daily basis,” a Ruby Tuesday spokeswoman said. “With the GiveBack Program specifically, we hope to raise funds within the communities of our restaurant that will directly contribute to research and ultimately find a cure for Alzheimer’s.”

What are you doing in your community to educate colleagues, peers, family and others about this disease? How can other stakeholders – including health systems and government – get more involved and join in efforts to raise awareness around the impact of Alzheimer’s year-round?

Categories: Access to Care

Groundbreaking Report Spotlights Benefits of Going Green for Hospitals

The Healthier Hospitals Initiative (HHI), a program that encourages hospitals to go healthier for patients by going greener, is marking its one-year anniversary by releasing the first-ever report (2012 Milestone Report) that quantifies the success of sustainability initiatives among hospitals in the U.S. and Canada.

HHI is made up of 13 sponsoring health systems and three nonprofit organizations including Health Care Without Harm, The Center for Health Design and Practice Greenhealth. As we reported in June, many hospitals are exploring ways to lower costs through environmentally friendly options and sustainable energy strategies.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

“The HHI Milestone report shows that hospitals are increasingly embedding sustainability into their core operating system,” said Gary Cohen, President of Health Care Without Harm and Founder of HHI.  “HHI also offers hospitals a powerful way to meet the Triple Aim of improving the patient experience, addressing population health and lower their costs.”

The report demonstrates how the green efforts of 370 hospitals are translating to substantial cost-savings and a reduction in waste. In addition to recycling more than 50 million pounds of materials and saving approximately $32 million from single-use medical device reprocessing, the report also found that participating hospitals are:

  • Preventing 61 million pounds of waste from going to landfills (among 44 member hospitals).
  • Creating more healthful meals for their patients by limiting overall meat intake, decreasing the amount of meat served by 10 percent from 2010-12.
  • Increasing the overall amount of money spent on healthful beverages from 10 percent to 62 percent.
  • One hospital reported purchasing more environmentally friendly cleaning supplies, spending on average more than 37.75 percent of their cleaning supply budgets on green cleaning products.

“At Practice Greenhealth, our strength comes from the collective expertise and knowledge that members bring to the table about what works to make our health care more sustainable,” said Laura Wenger, RN, Executive Director of Practice Greenhealth. “HHI’s 2012 Milestone Report is proof that hospitals of all sizes benefit from this wisdom.”

The Commonwealth Fund 2012 report found that if health care organizations, such as hospitals, adopted sustainable practices, industry savings could add up to an estimated $5.4 billion in 5 years and more than $15 billion over 10 years.  The study also concludes that health systems that embrace green initiatives are examples for the health care system as a whole to follow.

“As part of a preventive approach to controlling chronic disease, increasing numbers of hospitals have committed to minimizing adverse environmental impact of their operations on patients, staff, and the community, serving as role models for the health sector and society at large,” the study authors noted.

Are health systems in your community embracing green initiatives? What do you see as the major barriers to more hospitals going green and what incentives could be created to overcome these challenges?

Categories: Cost-Savings

August Health Awareness Days Provide Opportunities to Take Action

As young people across the country go back to school, patient advocates and government stakeholders are leveraging awareness days to help communities learn about health issues impacting children, prevention strategies and efforts to improve care. Here are some examples:

Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month
Each August organizations including the Envision Foundation underscore the need for screenings and examinations to promote early detection, intervention and prevention of vision problems in children.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Vision disorders in children cost Americans more than $5.7 billion in direct and indirect expenses each year, while the overall cost of vision problems nationwide soars to an estimated $139 billion (includes long-term care, productivity loss and medical bills), according to Prevent Blindness America. Treating eye disorders and vision loss early in life helps protect children from developing chronic, lifelong conditions that become more expensive to treat because of long-term, indirect costs that increase as populations age.

“The beginning of a new school year is an exciting time in a child’s life,” Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness America, said in a statement.  “By working together with parents and educators, we hope to give all our kids a bright and healthy start!”

National Immunization Awareness Month
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) highlights the need to improve national immunization coverage levels throughout August. To communicate the importance of immunizations now and throughout the year, NPHIC also developed a toolkit tailored to various populations including babies and pregnant women, pre-teens and teens, young adults, and adults. The toolkit seeks to:

  • Encourage parents of young children to get recommended immunizations by age 2.
  • Help parents ensure older children, preteens and teens have received all recommended vaccines by the time they return to school.
  • Remind college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories.
  • Educate adults, including health care workers, about vaccines and boosters they may need.
  • Urge pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect newborns from diseases like whooping cough.
  • Raise awareness that the next flu season is only a few months away.

The CDC also makes a wide array of resources available for those who want to learn more about the importance of immunizations or spread the word.

Neurosurgery Outreach Awareness Month
The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is among the organizations that underscores why the beginning of the school year is a great time to educate communities about strategies to prevent sports-related head and neck injuries like concussions. AANS provides tools to help others more effectively identify symptoms of potentially serious head/neck injuries and take preventive steps to ensure safety, also offering the following tips:

  • Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials for sports 100 percent of the time.
  • Remain abreast of the latest guidelines and rules governing sports with a high prevalence of head injuries including cheerleading, volleyball, and soccer.

“Concussion awareness, understanding the symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” AANS Public Relations Committee chair Kevin Lillehei, MD, FAANS, said in a statement. “Educating the public is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries. That is why it’s so important to raise awareness in the community and explain just what some of the effects are that these injuries have.”

Psoriasis Awareness Month
Sponsored by The National Psoriasis Foundation each year, Psoriasis Awareness Month is dedicated to “raise awareness, encourage research and advocate for better care for people with psoriasis.”

The most common autoimmune disease in the US affecting 7.5 million Americans, Psoriasis occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth of skin cells and produce red, scaly patches that itch and bleed. About 20,000 children under 10 are also diagnosed, often experiencing symptoms that include pitting and discoloration of the nails, severe scalp scaling, diaper dermatitis or plaques.

As part of Psoriasis Awareness Month, NPF is creating a community of “Pscientists” to “answer real‑world questions about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.”

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month
Although it’s considered a “rare disorder” with approximately 1 in 6000 babies born affected by it, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease that causes voluntary muscles to weaken and in some cases can lead to death, according to the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Types I, II and III belong to a group of hereditary diseases that weaken the voluntary muscles in the arms and legs of infants and children, contributing to breathing issues, difficulty eating and drinking, impaired mobility and orthopedic complications.

Families of SMA, which has coordinated activities around SMA Awareness Month since 1996, and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), are two national organizations that support those living with SMA. Click here to learn about events this month, community networks and research projects for treatment and therapies.

What activities are taking place in your community to support one or more of these awareness days? What could the institutions in your neighborhood, workplace or at your school be doing year-round to more effectively engage populations about critical health issues?

Categories: Access to Care

Personal Connections with Pharmacists Drive Medication Adherence Outcomes

With nearly half of all patients in the US not taking their medications as prescribed, medication non-adherence remains a dangerous and expensive problem that costs the health care system $329 billion annually (Express Scripts Drug Trend Report), meaning more hospitalizations and visits to the emergency room (ER).

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

So what’s the good news? Effective, comprehensive solutions are emerging to reverse this trend by involving the pharmacist to improve medication adherence rates through a personal connection with patients.

Recent stories underscore how pharmacists are uniquely positioned to engage patients in conversations that help them understand why treatments are prescribed and why meds should be taken as directed.

A report released on June 25 by the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA), for example, illustrates how interpersonal relationships between pharmacists and patients boost adherence. Authors of the report found that a patient’s sense of connectedness with one’s pharmacist or pharmacy staff was the survey’s “single strongest individual predictor of medication adherence.”

“Pharmacists can help patients and caregivers overcome barriers to effectively and consistently follow medication regimens,” NCPA CEO B. Douglas Hoey, RPh, MBA, said in a statement. “Indeed, independent community pharmacists in particular may be well-suited to boost patient adherence given their close connection with patients and their caregivers.”

According to the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), one effective method pharmacists can use to improve adherence is medication therapy management (MTM) services for patients taking more than one drug for multiple chronic medical conditions. In addition to therapy reviews, pharmacotherapy consults, anticoagulation management, immunizations, health and wellness programs and other clinical services, MTM involves the following elements:

  • Comprehensive medication review, including a personal medication report that lists all the medications the patient is taking.
  • Medication action plan.
  • Education and counseling or other resources to enhance understanding about using the medication and to improve adherence.
  • Coordination of care, including documenting MTM services, providing the documentation to other providers, and referring patients to other providers as needed.

Pharmacists can also leverage a variety of practical tips to help patients improve adherence that include:

  • Discussing the appropriateness of each medication and its impact on their multiple medical conditions.
  • Evaluating the effectiveness and safety of each medication.
  • Assessing whether some medications may be unnecessary and should be discontinued.
  • Discussing the need to change medications or doses if problems arise.

The implications of improved adherence will help lower the cost of treating chronic conditions, decrease hospitalizations, reduce ER visits and by extension lower the risk of treatment failures, serious adverse reactions and deaths too.

“Studies have repeatedly recorded the cost-saving effect of MTM,” said Kevin Schweers, Senior Vice President, Public Affairs, NCPA. “One Minnesota study found a 12:1 return-on-investment for MTM.  In North Carolina, Kerr Drug reports that MTM programs for seniors produced a 13:1 return. Improved adherence would likely help reduce hospitalizations as well. So many prescription drugs are intended to treat chronic conditions, such as heart disease, that can result in hospitalization. In addition, hospital re-admissions can result from the failure to stick to a prescribed medication regimen.”

Joel Zive, adjunct clinical faculty, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, underscored the need for patients to cultivate relationships with their pharmacists.

“While MTM services are quite important in helping adherence, getting to know your pharmacist’s name is helpful in establishing a relationship with your pharmacist,” he said. “Pharmacists are trained to pick up clinical clues from patients.  This is why if you are having unusual reactions medications, speaking to your pharmacist is an option.”

Although MTM services are an effective way to increase adherence, greater participation among patients and pharmacists is needed according to the APhA and the National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE).

In addition to leveraging tips and strategies to boost adherence, pharmacists can also draw on a number of resources for patients, referring them to the NCPIE wallet card and to a brochure made available by NCPIE and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), “Your Medicine: Be Smart. Be Safe.”

What else can pharmacists do to engage patients? How can stakeholders in health care, government, academia and the private sector collaborate to improve dialogue among pharmacists and patients around strategies that increase adherence?

Striking the Right Balance for Better Patient Outcomes

A recent article in Health Affairs reports that ChenMed – which serves low-to-moderate income elderly patients primarily through the Medicare Advantage program – is achieving better health outcomes for Medicare-eligible seniors, including those living with five or more major and chronic health conditions.  Dozens of Chen and JenCare Neighborhood Medical Centers are helping tens of thousands of seniors live better, longer: 

chris_chen

Dr. Christopher Chen, ChenMed CEO

  • Total hospital days per 1,000 patients at ChenMed in 2011 were 1,058 for the Miami area in comparison with 1,712 total US hospital days per 1,000 patients in the same year (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary).
  • Just one year prior, according to Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, the Miami Hospital Referral Region was above the 90th percentile in inpatient hospital days.

Why is ChenMed so successful?

Dr. Christopher Chen, CEO of the organization, says its patient care model integrates cutting-edge medical expertise in a way that empowers physicians to ensure patients receive personalized attention and optimal care.

“People always ask, ‘What is your secret?’ There really is no secret,” he says. “It comes down to having the right incentives, the right physician and staff culture, and the right philosophy of care. My goal at the end of the day is to be cost-effective through improvement of outcomes by changing the philosophy of care. We care about results.”

The group practice’s popularity also attests to its effective one-stop-shop approach to patient-centered care through multi-specialty services. Smaller physician panel sizes of 350-450 patients spur intensive health coaching and preventive care, and prescriptions are given to patients during their visits at all Chenand JenCare Neighborhood Medical Centers.

This aspect of ChenMed’s model makes the biggest difference in boosting medication adherence, followed by strong one-on-one doctor-patient relationships that help to change habits for the better. Receiving meds within 3-5 minutes of ordering drugs not only means patients don’t have to wait for the treatment they need, but that they receive their medications while having face-to-face interactions with their primary care doctors.

“In our model we aren’t looking for high-income patients,” Dr. Chen says. “People ask, ‘Are you saying that patients like you because you give more attention to them and provide more access to doctors than those who pay for concierge service?’ I would say yes.”

ChenMed continuously employs top specialists from a variety of fields to conveniently provide fully integrated medical services to patients.  It effectively combines services like acupuncture into its portfolio of care, and improves outcomes and patient experience with customized end-to-end technologies enhancing its daily operations. For example, all the medical assistants and staff are equipped with iPads and can offer physician support tailored to each patient. This fuels collaboration, enabling doctors to work side by side with patients and providing a significant convenience to all parties as a result.

Primary care physicians at Chen and JenCare Neighborhood Medical Centers also meet three times a week, engaging in thoughtful ongoing discussions that generate numerous enhancements to care and delivery for better outcomes.

“We discuss whether a hospitalization could be improved through better outpatient care. We ask, ‘What can we do to improve patient outcomes while the patient is in the hospital?’ We innovate to improve outcomes and can achieve great things for patients because of our small panel sizes. These meetings have saved many lives and continue to do so,” explains Dr. Chen.

When interviewing prospective doctors to work at ChenMed, they are asked whether they like spending time with patients and whether they love the complexity of medicine. If they say no to either of those questions, then this group is probably not the best place for them, Dr. Chen says, underscoring that:

“We want you to practice medicine the way you thought you would when you graduated from medical school. It’s not about how many patients you see, how many procedures you do, or how much you bill. You should want to be a doctor to make people feel better.” 

ChenMed, through its Primary Management Resources subsidiary, also provides behind-the-scenes consulting services to enhance medical practice operations nationwide.  Physicians interested in end-to-end solutions that streamline operations while enhancing patient health outcomes and the patient experience should contact ChenMed at (305) 628-6117 or go to ChenMed.com.

Targeted Therapies Open Door to Improved Outcomes and Lower Costs to Treat HCV

As we were reminded on World Hepatitis Day, early detection is critical to turning the tide of this “silent epidemic” that impacts millions. However, strategies to end the deadly effects of viral hepatitis don’t stop there. Personalized treatment is another essential tool that fuels better outcomes for patients with hepatitis C (HCV) while saving money in the long term for the health care system too. 

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

The importance of finding effective therapies for HCV is underscored by the reality that the disease often goes undetected, with an estimated 80 percent of Americans with HCV unaware of their status. Many HCV-positive people show mild to no symptoms, making it more likely for the illness to progress and become more expensive to treat as a result. 

Although safe and effective vaccines are available for hepatitis A and B, none exist for HCV. To help answer this need, Abbott created the fully automated RealTime HCV Genotype II Test – the first FDA-approved genotyping test in the United States for HCV patients – to facilitate targeted diagnosis and treatment that boosts desired outcomes.

This treatment-defining genotyping test empowers physicians to better pinpoint specific strains of HCV, determine which treatment option is best for the patient, and make more informed recommendations about when it should be administered. Available to individuals with chronic HCV, the test is not meant to act as a means to screen the blood prior to diagnosis.

So how does finding the right HCV treatment save money?

Targeted therapies like these are important for diseases like HCV because they reduce the “trial and error” of having to use additional treatments when the initial ones don’t work, saving money and time for patients and providers. Early detection, combined with follow-up care, can prevent patients from developing later stages of hepatitis that can mean more serious long-term conditions that are harder and more expensive to treat.

Treating HCV patients with end-stage liver disease, for example, is 2.5 times higher than treating those with early stage liver disease. Advanced HCV can also escalate to chronic hepatitis infection, a side effect of this being cirrhosis (scarring of the liver and poor liver function) and liver cancer. Treatment for these two conditions (which can include a liver transplant) can cost more than $30,000. Liver cancer treatment can be more than $62,000 for the first year, while the first-year cost of a liver transplant can be more than $267,000.

As more and more patients find themselves unable to afford treatments, HCV is becoming an increasingly larger financial burden on the health care system.

The annual costs of treating HCV in the United States could be up to $9 billion, and over the course of a lifetime the collective cost associated with treatments for chronic HCV is estimated to total $360 billion.

“As we see patients with more advanced liver disease, we see significantly more costs to the system,” says Dr. Stuart Gordon, author of the Henry Ford Study. “The key, therefore, is to treat and cure the infection early to prevent the consequences of more advanced disease and the associated economic burden.”  

Targeted therapies show great promise to improve outcomes while saving time and money by linking patients to the specific treatments they need at earlier points of diagnosis. But what can health systems do to make innovations like the HCV Genotype II Test accessible to more patients and increase the cost-savings benefit on a larger scale?

Good for Your Body and Your Budget

Does stocking your shelves with nutritious foods always mean breaking your budget at the grocery store or local market? You probably think the answer is yes, but what we found might shock you.

Paul DeMiglio

Paul DeMiglio

Dawn Undurraga, a consulting nutritionist for the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and registered dietitian, tells a different story: Purchasing healthy foods and saving money can go hand in hand.

“Maintaining a delicious diet that’s good for you and the planet doesn’t have to be expensive,” she says. “You can eat 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables for less than the cost of a bus ride, for example. But people need the tools to help make this happen.”

And that’s exactly what the EWG “Good Food on a Tight Budget” free shopping guide provides, to help people eat cheap, clean, green and healthy.

“We focused on the things that you can do and the changes you can make to save money,” Undurraga says, based on recent data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as well as feedback from groups that have on-the-ground expertise empowering consumers to navigate through the issues surrounding tight budgets, like Feeding America and Share Our Strength.

This guide includes lists that open the door to purchasing foods with the most nutritional value for the lowest price, including 15 practical recipes that on average cost less than $1.

Tips enable shoppers to spend their dollars smartly, specifying which items are best to purchase frozen (like corn) or fresh (like lima beans), as well as how to prepare dishes at home and how to make your foods last longer.

One key recommendation for saving money on a nutritious eating regimen is to plan meals ahead, budget your time while shopping and to know what you want at the store beforehand.

“When you do, you’ll find you waste less food. Not wasting food by having a good plan can save you money too. When you shop with a meal list and a timeline, you can get in and out of a store quickly,” without going outside your budget by getting distracted and purchasing less healthy foods you don’t want or need, Undurraga explains.

The EWG created “Good Food on a Tight Budget” based on specific measures to establish the amount of pesticides that the foods contain, also comparing and rating the foods to organize the guide on a balance of five factors.

  • Beneficial nutrients
  • Nutrients to minimize (i.e. sodium)
  • Price
  • Extent of processing
  • Harmful contaminants from environmental pollution and food packaging

The USDA also underscores that planning your meals for the week and doing an inventory of foods you already have before making a list are essential. They also encourage buying non-perishables in bulk during sales and to purchase foods in season to get the lowest prices while optimizing freshness.

Similar strategies for making healthy shopping choices on a budget can also be found herehere and here.

All the research, planning and preparation involved in being a selective shopper might seem daunting at first, but the payoff to your health and budget is worth the investment.

“There’s so many ways to put together a diet. The shoppers who often make the most of their budget are those already on a tight budget. It’s tough but possible,” when you incorporate approaches that work best for you, Undurraga says.

Have you used any of these tips when grocery shopping? Did they help make it easier to purchase healthy foods and stay within your financial means? Tell us why or why not.

Categories: Cost-Savings