Author Archives: Jamie Elizabeth Rosen, Editor, Real World Health Care

Four Ways Data is Transforming Your Health

The increasing availability of data about health care in the U.S. is empowering patients to take charge of their care and quietly revolutionizing how patients are treated. Last month, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services released data on which services were provided by over 880,000 health care providers, how many times each service was provided, and what the providers charged. Yesterday, top health and technology experts for the federal government and the Brookings Institution gathered to discuss how the growing catalogue of public health care data is leading to profound improvements in America’s health care. The event was hosted by Brookings’ Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform in collaboration with 1776 DC’s Challenge Festival.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Here are the top four ways that data transparency is already beginning to transform Americans’ health. The benefits are expected to grow as the data is analyzed, matched with other sources, and organized into user-friendly and accessible formats.

 

1.    Selecting the best doctor

When Farzad Mostashari learned that his mother needed an epidural steroid injection, he wanted to find out which orthopedic surgeon was the best at this specific procedure. So he searched the millions of medical claims recently released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to discover which providers were the most experienced in this procedure.

An interesting result emerged. “There is one provider who does more than everyone else combined,” said Mostashari, who is a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he is focused on payment reform and delivery system transformation. “He’s probably pretty good.”

As health care data increasingly becomes available, patients will have more information to make the most rational decisions for their health care, said Kavita Patel, a physician and fellow in the Economic Studies program and managing director for clinical transformation and delivery at the Engelberg Center.

Patel asks her patients why they choose to see her. “Nobody’s ever said: ‘I looked up your quality scores and saw that your out-of-pocket costs are less than the average provider in your area,” Patel said of her 12 years in medical practice. “This is one of the first times that everyone in this room can take out a laptop…and look at this data.”

Mostashari added that the data can be used to identify outliers. For instance, he found that while the average orthopedic surgeon performed controversial spinal fusion surgeries on 7 percent of the patients they saw, some did so on 35 percent. This knowledge empowers patients to choose providers that best align with their health care values and preferences.

 

2.    Reducing costs

The newly-released CMS data enables comparisons of the prices different providers charge for the same services. This data reveals that in some cases providers charge vastly different rates to Medicare for the same services, Mostashari said. The Wall Street Journal provides a consumer-friendly database detailing the types of procedures, number of each, and costs per procedure charged by individual health care providers.

Last year’s release of hospital charges led some hospitals that were charging higher rates to uninsured and underinsured patients than their peers to seek advice from CMS. “Some hospital associations called us and said, ‘We want to change. Help us develop new accounting practices to set prices more fairly for those who are uninsured or underinsured,’” said Jonathan Blum, Principal Deputy Administrator at CMS.

The ability to access and analyze a growing amount of data on procedures performed and their outcomes also helps patients and providers avoid low value services and make decisions about the relative risks and benefits of different procedures. Patel pointed out an ABIM Foundation initiative called Choosing Wisely that equips providers and patients with lists of procedures that should be carefully considered and discussed to ensure that care is supported by evidence, not duplicative, free from harm, and truly necessary.

 

3.    Promoting accountability

When health care providers know that their records will be publically available for scrutiny, they are incentivized to ensure that they won’t be embarrassed by what people find. This can profoundly change which procedures providers choose. For instance, one analysis revealed a wide disparity between the percentage of black versus white patients who were tested for cholesterol levels. “Simply asking providers how often they were doing [cholesterol tests], without any payment incentive,” removed this disparity, said Darshak Sanghavi, the Richard Merkin fellow and a managing director of the Engelberg Center. “This is one example of how simple transparency can improve health care and ultimately save lives.”

 

4.    Expediting spread of best practices

Jonathan Blum, Principal Deputy Administrator at CMS, has seen data transparency expedite the uptake of best practices by health care providers and public health authorities. For example, when analyzing the data on dialysis providers, CMS found that there was an uptick in blood transfusions by certain providers in specific geographic regions. “Our medical team got on the phone and called the dialysis providers and said: ‘Did you know you are doing more blood transfusions than your peers?’” The result? Those providers decreased blood transfusions, improving health outcomes for their patients. The same pattern occurred for nursing home facilities that overused antipsychotic drugs.

“I want to convince folks that you can change policy, you can change procedures, you can make things safer,” Blum said. “Data liberation can help us build [accountable care organizations], help us build better payment policies, help us reduce hospital readmissions. There is tremendous opportunity ahead for us.”

Bryan Sivak, Chief Technology Officer at the Department of Health & Human Services, added that data transparency is affording entrepreneurs from outside the health care sector – such as startups Aidin, Purple Binder, and Oscar – the potential to transform the health care system.

“We’re sitting on the edge of an incredible moment in history,” he said. “Everybody is looking at things in a different way because everybody understands that we have to do things differently.”

“Government data is a public good and a national asset,” said Claudia Williams, Senior Advisor for Health IT and Innovation for the U.S. CTO in the White House. “It’s something we have to release if we can to allow innovation and change.”

How do you make your health care decisions? Have you used any of these new tools?

Categories: General

Four benefits of electronic health records

Leaders from industry, academia, and health care discuss the rollout of this technology at The Atlantic’s sixth annual Health Care Forum

Today The Atlantic Health Care Forum brought together leading policymakers and industry experts in medicine, public health, and nutrition to have conversations about the state of the nation’s health care system. The event was sponsored by Siemens, Surescripts, WellPoint, GSK and PhRMA. Real World Health Care attended to share insights from the panel “Health Care Tomorrow: Examining the Tools and Technologies that Will Revolutionize the Future Health Care System.”

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Much of the discussion centered around electronic health records, which are increasingly being rolled out in huge hospital systems after the federal government incentivized their adoption to the tune of billions of dollars five years ago. Four themes emerged from the panel, which included top executives from Johns Hopkins Medicine, athenahealth, PhRMA, and Carolinas HealthCare System.

 

1. Enhancing collaboration.

Electronic health records facilitate a team-based approach to hospital care, as well as allowing for better coordination between hospital systems. “What we’re going to see is it’s going to drive team-based clinical care because everyone in the system will have access to the same medical records,” said Dr. Paul Rothman, Dean of the Medical Faculty and Vice President for Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University and Chief Executive Officer at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You’re going to see an [increased] level of collaboration not only between delivery systems, but also between the patient and the health care provider.”

However, Ed Park, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, athenahealth, warned that the decades-old technologies that many hospital systems are using are limited in their capabilities. “The current crop of [electronic health records] are documentation tools instead of care management tools,” he said, adding that they are primarily for use by insurers and lawyers. “What I fear is health systems beginning to buy their way into their own prisons that are built of their own IT…as opposed to dealing in an open environment,” he said.

 

2. Enabling patient-centered care.

Electronic health records enable patients to reap greater benefits from telehealth. “Having your information on your iPhone: that’s not far away,” Dr. Rothman said. “[Patients are] going to do EKG’s at home. They’re going to be measuring their blood sugar at home. The patient will have control of the data.”

Electronic records also hold the promise of helping to solve age-old problems in the U.S. health care system, including keeping contact with patients to encourage them to take prescribed treatment regimens. “There is almost $350 billion a year in inefficiency because of lack of compliance and adherence with medications,” said John Castellani, President and Chief Executive Officer, PhRMA. “If you could just get an improvement in whether patients take the medicines that are prescribed, you could capture this great savings.”

“You have kids who have kidney transplants, and you can give them reminders on Facebook that they have to take their medications,” Dr. Rothman added.

 

3. Targeting therapies for increased success.

Electronic medical records can help health care providers ensure that they prescribe the treatments most likely to work for their patients.

“What I think is the promise of electronic medical records is our ability to find subsets of diseases through the broad diseases we treat,” Dr. Rothman said. “Asthma isn’t one disease. Obesity isn’t one disease. Diabetes isn’t one disease. We are going to be able to find subsets of diseases and target therapies [that work]. That’s when you’re going to see efficiency and return on investment.”

 

4. Harnessing the power of big data.

Our health care system has already begun to see the benefits of ‘big data’ with examples such as the discovery of drug side effects and interactions through mining consumer web search data. “We have to use the technologies to bring down the cost of the drug discovery process,” Castellani said.

“Just taking care of the patient, we capture data,” said Dr. Roger Ray, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Carolinas HealthCare System. “That allows us to know when a patient…may be at risk for hospital readmission. Having the ability to mine [data]…makes a difference for patients.

“We all, each of us, remember with longing a simpler time when we could scribble and walk off and our job was done,” he added. “What we know now is that’s not very good for the patient. We had no standardization allowing us to help patients avoid lots of different bad outcomes they could have.”

 

Have electronic medical records impacted your health or that of your patients? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

Our Top 4 Most ‘Liked’ Health Care Stories

This week is Real World Health Care’s one-year anniversary. Over the past year, we showcased solutions that are proven to lower costs, increase access, and provide more patient-centered care. In celebration of this milestone, we are sharing the favorite posts as measured by Facebook ‘likes’ from our readers, who have visited the blog over 10,000 times.

 

#4 – Keeping Boston Strong: How Disaster Training at Osteopathic Medical School Helped Save Lives

In May, former RWHC editor Paul DeMiglio told the story of Dr. Danielle Deines’ emergency response to the Boston Marathon bombing. Dr. Deines’ education at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Virginia Campus (VCOM) required her to participate in a two-day, mandatory training curriculum on Bioterrorism and Disaster Response Program, which immersed her in real-life disaster training, field exercises and specialized courses.

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

(Photo courtesy of VCOM)

The day of the bombing, after crossing the finish line, Dr. Deines found herself triaging runners in medical tents to make room for the victims. “The back corner became the most severe triage area, nearest the entrance where the ambulances were arriving,” she said. “I saw victims with traumatic amputations of the lower extremities, legs that had partially severed or had shrapnel embedded, and clothing and shoes literally blown off of victims’ bodies.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/05/keeping-boston-strong-how-disaster-training-at-osteopathic-medical-school-helped-save-lives/

 

#3 – Making Life Easier for Patients and Loved Ones: Meet MyHealthTeams

In April, Eric Peacock, Co-founder and CEO of MyHealthTeams, contributed a guest blog about the need for social networks for communities of people living with chronic conditions. These networks allow patients to “share recommendations of local providers, openly discuss daily triumphs and issues, share tips and advice, and gain access to local services,” he wrote.

“Sharing with people who are in your shoes offers a sense of community that can’t be found elsewhere – these are people who know the language of your condition; they understand the daily frustrations and the small triumphs that can mean so much,” he added.

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/04/making-life-easier-for-patients-and-loved-ones-meet-myhealthteams/

 

#2 – When the Health Care Blogger Becomes the Cancer Patient

In August, even as she was still undergoing daily radiation treatments, contributor Linda Barlow shared her personal story of being diagnosed with cancer and the slew of medical bills she faced even though she had insurance.

Linda Barlow

Linda Barlow

“While these out of pocket costs are certainly hard to swallow – I can think of a hundred other things I’d rather spend my money on – for my family, they are doable,” she wrote. “We won’t have to skip a mortgage payment or a utility bill. We won’t have to dip into a child’s college tuition fund. We certainly won’t have to worry about having enough money for food. But I know – from my work on this blog and with its main sponsor, the HealthWell Foundation – that many families living with cancer aren’t so lucky.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2013/08/when-the-health-care-blogger-becomes-the-cancer-patient/

 

#1 – What If You Want Politicians to Get Moving But You Can’t Move?

Neil Cavuto

Neil Cavuto

Last week, Neil Cavuto, Senior Vice President and Anchor, Fox News and Fox Business, contributed a moving guest post about his triumphs over multiple sclerosis (MS) for MS Awareness Week. His deeply personal blog inspired resounding praise in the comments section and 1,300 Facebook ‘likes’.

“If I can pass along any advice at all, it is…to simply never accept a prognosis as is,” he wrote. “Fight it. Challenge it. ‘Will’ yourself over it. Many doctors say it’s a naïve approach to the disease, but attitude counts a lot for me with MS, as it did for me two decades ago when I was battling advanced Hodgkin’s Disease. Then, as now, it was about one day at a time, and staying optimistic and positive all the time.”

Read the post: http://www.realworldhealthcare.org/2014/03/ms-awareness-week/

 

If you would like to suggest a topic, contribute a guest post, or learn more about short-term co-sponsorship opportunities, please contact us at dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com. As a blog currently sponsored solely by the HealthWell Foundation, an independent non-profit providing nationwide financial assistance to insured Americans with high out-of-pocket medication expenses, co-sponsorship helps us keep Real World Health Care alive and well as a resource for journalists, health care professionals, policymakers, and patients. Plus, co-sponsorship will increase your organization’s visibility among thought leaders in the health care sphere.

Do you have a favorite Real World Health Care post? Is there something you’d like to see more of? Post to the comments section or tweet at us at @RWHCblog.

A Shot of Courage for Those Who Fear Needles

This is the first of a two-part series on what’s working to prevent and address needle fear.

Most people don’t enjoy shots.

But for those with needle phobia, the fear of shots can be so severe that they actively avoid medical procedures involving injections, and in extreme cases avoid medical care more generally.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Needle phobia can arise from genetic and environmental factors, including experiencing pain during encounters with needles or seeing others uncomfortable or distressed by needles. Studies show that approximately two out of three children and one in four adults are afraid of needles, and 10 percent of adults have an outright needle phobia, characterized by avoidance behavior and physiological responses, such as increased heart rate or fainting.

The miracle of modern medicine has enabled us to protect ourselves from a range of dangerous or life-threatening diseases. In one recent study, seven to eight percent of adults and children reported avoiding potentially life-saving immunizations as a result of needle fear. Given the growth of vaccine-preventable outbreaks throughout the world (check out this interactive map), this is not only a concern for individual health but also for public health.

Preventing and Addressing Needle Fear

Fortunately, a growing cadre of empathetic health professionals is taking the prevention of needle pain, which can trigger needle fear, to the next level.

“In order to combat pain, vascular access professionals across the country are looking at creative ways to address patient pain and patients’ perception of pain,” said nursing leader and vascular access expert Lorelle Wuerz, MSN, BS, BA, RN, VA-BC. “Offering the patient options before you do any procedure is important.”

Wuerz said that she uses a variety of interventions to combat needle fear and pain in patients, including:

  • Ensuring patients know what to expect;
  • Deep breathing;
  • Guided imagery;
  • Distraction techniques;
  • Topical agents;
  • Warm compresses;
  • Involvement of child life professionals;
  • Pain control devices, such as Buzzy®;
  • Aromatherapy (“Anecdotally, this is something patients find soothing and calming during an uneasy time,” Wuerz said.).

Needle pain prevention extends beyond traditional health care settings. For instance, after discovering that 23 percent of Americans who skipped flu vaccination did so to avoid needles, Target Pharmacy began offering micro-needle flu vaccines. The needles are 90% smaller than those that have traditionally been used and reportedly result in less muscle ache and pain immediately following injection.

“Treating needle pain reduces pain and distress and improves satisfaction with medical care,” wrote pain researcher Anna Taddio in a chapter on needle procedures in the Oxford Textbook of Paediatric Pain. “Other potential benefits include a reduction in the development of needle fear and subsequent health care avoidance behaviour.” 

The 4 Ps of Needle Pain Management

In the Oxford Textbook chapter, Taddio outlined the four domains of interventions that can reduce needle pain for patients, known as the 4 Ps: procedural, pharmacological, psychological, and physical.

Procedural interventions involve bypassing needles altogether through the use of needle-free immunization or non-invasive sampling devices. Pharmacological interventions include local anesthetics, which have been shown to be effective and safe for reducing pain from common needle procedures, and sweet solutions for infants up to 12 months, which have been shown to reduce needle pain behaviors. Psychological interventions include coaching people to cope and providing distractions. Physical interventions – such as upright body positioning, tactile stimulation, and use of cooling agents or ice – can also reduce the perception of needle pain.

Empowering Ourselves

Many people will celebrate the day when shots are replaced with futuristic technology, such as a robotic pill or one of many other innovations currently in development.

In the meantime, what can patients do to help themselves? “A patient should never not speak up,” Wuerz said. “It’s okay to have all of the information before you make a choice.”

Stay tuned for Part II of the series, in which Dr. Amy Baxter, MD – pain researcher, CEO of MMJ Labs, and inventor of Buzzy® Drug Free Pain Relief – will outline how you can protect yourself and your family from needle pain. Dr. Baxter will appear on ABC’s Shark Tank Friday, February 28 at 9:00 pm EST.

How do you respond to needles? What works for you? Have you had a good experience with a health care professional? Post your experiences to the comments section.

Smoking Out Nicotine Addiction: What’s Working in the War on Cigarettes

With CVS Pharmacy’s recent announcement that cigarettes and other tobacco containing products will no longer be sold in its stores, Real World Health Care has been crunching the numbers on the success of anti-tobacco efforts and reviewing recent advances in smoking cessation. Here’s what we’ve found:

  • #1. Smoking still holds the unfortunate distinction of causing more preventable deaths than anything else.
  • 8 million. That’s how many lives have been saved by 50 years of anti-smoking efforts, according to a recent study by researchers from Yale University.

    Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

    Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

  • 19%. That’s the current smoking rate in the U.S., down from a whopping 42% five decades ago when U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry published the first report on the negative health impacts of smoking.
  • 3,000. The number of young people who still try their first cigarette every day. Almost 700 become regular smokers.
  • 7,600. The number of store locations that will no longer sell tobacco products as a result of CVS’s decision. Under the Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration cannot mandate what retailers sell, although interestingly it does have the power to mandate the amount of nicotine in cigarettes in addition to advertising restrictions and general standards for tobacco production

Public consciousness, regulation, and education on the harmful effects of tobacco are all factors in the tremendous progress that has been made in saving lives. The World Health Organization’s global recommendations for tobacco control are known as the MPOWER measures and include the following:

WHO_MPOWER

With the efforts of both public and private sector actors, 2014 could be a watershed year for tobacco control in the U.S. In addition to CVS’s tobacco ban, several new initiatives on the part of the government and private industry have already been announced this year that address components of MPOWER:

  • Earlier this month, the FDA launched a new media campaign targeting youth. “We are addressing one of the biggest public health problems in this country and in the world,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said. “It’s something the FDA has not really done before in terms of a broad public health campaign of this magnitude but it’s something that we are so pleased to be doing because it matters for health.”
  • Walgreens and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Consumer Healthcare announced a smoking cessation initiative. Along with resources to help quit smoking, Walgreens’ new Sponsorship to Quit provides smokers with 24/7 tips and tools, celebrations for milestones, a free consultation and other valuable support systems for smokers in their journey to quit. MinuteClinic also provides online tips, tools and facts to help smokers kick their habits.

Have you or anyone you know succeeded in quitting smoking cigarettes or using other tobacco products? Have you seen an effective campaign against tobacco? Post to the comments section to share your impressions of what works.

World Cancer Day 2014: What’s Working in Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment?

Today is World Cancer Day, an annual awareness day that aims to help save millions of people globally from preventable deaths each year. Americans continue to make advances against many forms of cancer, although progress still remains slow against other forms of cancer, such as pancreatic and glioblastoma, that urgently require more research.

In the US, death rates from cancer have decreased by 20% since the early 1990s. This means that four hundred additional lives are saved from cancer every day, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Last year, ACS created a great video explaining why we are making great strides against some forms of cancer.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, there is reason for hope. There are more than 13 million Americans alive today who have survived cancer, and that number continues to grow. A plethora of resources are available for people navigating cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as for those who want to advance solutions, and research continues to help more people survive.

Prevention

Due to decades of investment in medical research, many of the causes of cancer as well as ways to protect ourselves are well-documented. According to the ACS, more than half of cancer deaths can now be prevented. ACS offers resources such as quizzes, calculators and reminders – as well as a Healthy Living newsletter and Powerful Choices podcast – to provide people with tips to improve health and reduce cancer risk. These resources provide details about healthy lifestyle choices like avoiding exposure to tobacco, excess sun, and radiation; eating healthy; and regularly engaging in physical activities.

Diagnosis

Early detection of cancer saves lives. ACS provides concrete cancer screening guidelines for check-ups at all stages of life. Promising diagnostic technologies for different cancer types are currently under development. Initiatives such as ‘Are You Dense Advocacy’ are working to improve use of existing diagnostic tools, in this case by empowering women for whom mammograms may be less effective.

Treatment

If you or someone you know is diagnosed with cancer, ACS offers a helpful guide on how to find and pay for treatment. Insurance companies can also help identify treatment providers. You can also find a support group. The American Association for Cancer Research offers information about finding cancer support groups as well as a directory of patient support and advocacy groups organized by type of cancer or group focus.

For cancer patients who wish to consider advancing medicine by participating in clinical trials, NIH’s National Cancer Institute provides resources for people interested in participating in clinical trials and ACS offers a Clinical Trials Matching Service.

For those who have medical insurance but have trouble affording treatment, charities such as the HealthWell Foundation have programs to help people pay their part of the cost. HealthWell has awarded over $140 million in assistance to more than 70,000 individuals living with cancer.

How you can help

  • The World Cancer Day website provides a list of creative ways you can help advance the fight against cancer as well as an advocacy toolkit to make the most of your efforts. They also provide a social media guide to help you spread the word.
  • Donate to a research organization or help patients directly today by donating to help open the Emergency Cancer Relief Fund so patients can focus on their fight to get better and not fight with medical bills.

Learn more

Interested in learning more about cancer? Check out these cancer-specific news sources:

  • Expert Voices provides expert commentary on Timely insight on cancer topics from the experts of ACS.
  • CURE magazine is a resource “combining science with humanity” to make cancer understandable.
  • The National Cancer Institute offers regular research updates in their news center and the CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control posts cancer news to their online newsroom.
  • Healthline offers a list of their 13 Best Cancer Blogs of 2013.

Have you or a loved one struggled with cancer? Have you found resources that you would recommend? Tell your story or post resources in the Comments section.

Categories: General

What’s Getting Lost in the Health Care Debate?

Health care has never been more highly politicized than today.

Last year, it was central to the third longest government shutdown in U.S. history. This week, it consumed a large chunk of President Obama’s State of the Union address. Every day, we are inundated by news of health exchange website defects, insurance policy cancellations, coverage that forces people to switch doctors, and a laundry list of other problems attributed to the Affordable Care Act. On the flip side, advocates complain of the problems that make the U.S. rank among the lowest in health system efficiency among advanced economies and hail the health care law as a ray of hope.

Jamie Elizabeth Rosen

Meanwhile, a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that one in four American families struggled to pay medical bills in 2012. Pretty dismal.

But there’s something missing from this barrage of coverage. Incredible advances are being made in health care every day, providing Americans with innovative ways to stay healthy, treat illnesses when they arise, and save money on medical problems. Just this month, a new program was launched to help people on Medicare living with multiple sclerosis afford copays for treatment; the FDA for the first time approved a postnatal test that can help parents identify possible causes of their child’s developmental delay or intellectual disability; and a study published in the Lancet showed that it is possible to train children’s immune systems to become less sensitive to peanuts.

At Real World Health Care, we focus on what is working.

That’s why I am proud to take over this week as editor of Real World Health Care. While much of my professional focus has been on health internationally – advocating for the development of vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, policies that save mothers and infants from dying during childbirth, and the formation of emergency medical systems in places where people have nowhere to turn – I am compelled by the notion that more attention must be focused on solutions that are improving U.S. patient care today. By serving as a central clearinghouse for information about improvements to segments of the U.S. health care system, we hope that our readers and those journalists who get ideas from our blog will be inspired to expand innovations that are working in health care today.

Real World Health Care – only entering its 11th month – already has a reputation for covering solutions to enhance nutrition, prevent diseases, reform medical education, improve hospitals, support patients, fund research, increase treatment adherence, and reduce costs. The blog serves as a resource for policy makers, health systems, research universities, non-profit health organizations, leading biopharmaceutical companies, government agencies, and the nation’s leading health journalists among thousands of others interested in practical and well-researched health care success stories.

We need your help to continue to grow our success. Have an idea for a story or a guest blog? Email me at jrosen@WHITECOATstrategies.com. Want to take part in advancing solutions in health care? Sign up for updates and share stories that inspire you via Twitter at https://twitter.com/RWHCblog. Do you believe in our mission to expedite improvements to our health care system? Consider co-sponsoring the blog while gaining visibility for your organization. We are now followed by over 300 health industry leaders each week, and journalists turn to us for story ideas about the good news on what’s working in our health care system. For more information, email dsheon@WHITECOATstrategies.com.

I look forward to continuing to cut through the political vitriol around health care with inspiring stories of what is keeping Americans healthy and saving lives. Thank you for giving meaning to our work by using this blog as a resource for yours.

Categories: General